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narrowpath
Member



Joined: 2005/1/9
Posts: 1100
Germany NRW

 Tentmaking



B.H. Clendennen said in one of his sermons featured here on SI that a businessman can preach, but a preacher should not be a businessman, though he can be a tentmaker.

This resounds with my spirit. I am in the ministry of preaching, but I need to support myself because the church is too small.

Does anyone of you have first-hand experience on this or know of any teaching resources on tentmaking?

 2018/8/24 12:19Profile
Jeremy221
Member



Joined: 2009/11/7
Posts: 1479


 Re: Tentmaking

Why don't you take a look at Denny Kenaston and the saints associated with Charity Fellowship.

 2018/8/25 1:27Profile
deltadom
Member



Joined: 2005/1/6
Posts: 1832
Hemel Hempstead

 Re:

I really miss Denny Kensington. He spent a lot of time in the prayer room

He was really down to earth. My dad used to run a landscaping business and run a church at the same time.
Morgan a pastor we know used to work for a phone company and run a church.

I always wanted to be a missionary in Israel but I think I have more chance of landing on the moon


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Dominic Shiells

 2018/8/25 6:25Profile
NoahJD83
Member



Joined: 2018/8/16
Posts: 18


 Re: Tentmaking

I've heard Zac Poonen talk a lot about full time pastors supporting themselves with working. He requires all his church workers to support themselves and take nothing from the church.

I would recommend him although I don't know what sermons to point you too, unless a search will yield a sermon exclusively on that topic (might be one, you could try searching youtube).

 2018/8/25 20:22Profile
ginnyrose
Member



Joined: 2004/7/7
Posts: 7486
Mississippi

 Re: Tentmaking

Mennonite preachers - who are on the Conservative spectrum - work at an occupation. The church will take a love offering once a month that will be apportioned out to the leadership team. In our case it is two pastors and one deacon. All three are self-employed. When we have someone come in for special meetings we will take an offering to help him defray his expenses plus give him extra for the time he was off his job.

According to the Didache pastors were to work at a trade as well.

Sandra


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Sandra Miller

 2018/9/11 20:35Profile
drifter
Member



Joined: 2005/6/6
Posts: 691
Campbell River, B.C.

 Re:

"Don’t you know that those who serve in the temple get their food from the temple, and that those who serve at the altar share in what is offered on the altar? In the same way, the Lord has commanded that those who preach the gospel should receive their living from the gospel." 1 Corinthians 9:13,14


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Nigel Holland

 2018/9/11 23:11Profile
drifter
Member



Joined: 2005/6/6
Posts: 691
Campbell River, B.C.

 Re:

Also I find Matthew Henry's commentary on 1 Corinthians 9 pertinent on this matter:

"Those who seek to do our souls good, should have food provided for them. But he (Paul) renounced his right, rather than hinder his success by claiming it. It is the people's duty to maintain their minister. He may wave his right, as Paul did; but those transgress a precept of Christ, who deny or withhold due support."


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Nigel Holland

 2018/9/11 23:17Profile
savannah
Member



Joined: 2008/10/30
Posts: 2067


 Re: Tentmaking



The words of Paul in 1 Corinthians 9:14 (“those who preach the Gospel should receive their living from the Gospel”) is frequently cited in support of salaried pastors. But this interpretation is highly dubious, as S. Atkerson and E. Svendsen point out:

1 Corinthians 9 does not refer to pastors, elders, or any other leader normally associated with today’s church. Instead it refers to “apostles” (those who are sent out), roughly equivalent to today’s missionary. We are to financially support “those who proclaim the Gospel” because of the nature of their work. The fundamental difference between the work of an elder (who is not financially supported) and the work of an apostle (who is financially supported) is that the apostle must uproot and travel from location to location. His stay is temporary; consequently, his odds for gaining employment at each location are slim. He would therefore need financial assistance to do the work for which he was sent. The elder, on the other hand, is stationed at one location. His stay is permanent . . . Even the apostles did not make their living from the church. The passage in question simply means that the need of the apostle for food, shelter, and clothing were to be met by the church (Matthew 10:9-11 was no doubt the pattern that the early church used for apostles). There was no salary involved (The Practice of the Early Church, pp.41-42).

Perhaps the strongest passage for paid pastors is 1 Timothy 5:17 (“Let the elders who rule well be considered worthy of double honor, especially those who work hard at preaching and teaching. For the Scripture says, ‘You shall not muzzle the ox while he is threshing,’ and ‘The laborer is worthy of his wages’”). But, again, this is most unlikely.

It is quite possible that 1 Timothy 5:17 has nothing to do with a salary or wage. Once again, S. Atkerson and E. Svendsen write:

The word “honor” in this verse (time in the Greek) means just what it is translated as – honor, not pay (unless we want to conclude that we should give some elders “double pay”!). If Paul had intended to teach that elders are to be paid, he could have used the Greek word misthos, which means “wages” (which he used in v.18). In v.18, Paul simply says that, just as an ox deserves to eat because of his work, and just as a worker deserves to be paid because of his work, so an elder deserves honor because of his work (v.19 gives an example of such honor – see also 1 Thessalonians 5:12-13. This same word (time) is used in 1 Timothy 6:1, are slaves to “pay” their masters? (The Practice of the Early Church, p.42).

In his treatment of this same passage,
R.C.H. Lenski adds these insightful comments:

It is generally assumed that the elders were paid for their services in the apostolic churches. We are convinced that this assumption is not tenable. The probability is that none of them were paid. The elders of the synagogues were not paid or salaried. Each synagogue had a number of elders, too many to have a payroll that would be large enough to support them. The apostolic congregations imitated the synagogue in this respect. Our passage speaks of “twofold honor,” not of twofold financial pay or salary. Paul’s two quotations support the injunction relating to according due honor to diligent elders; such honor is to be their reward just as the ox treading out grain is accorded the privilege of eating as he tramped along, just as the worker is accorded his pay. The tertium of the analogy lies in the worthiness and not in the identity of what the three are worthy of: the elders worthy of what naturally should go with their office – honor; the ox worthy of what naturally goes with the task for which he is employed – wisps of grain; the workman worthy of what naturally goes with his work – pay for his work (Commentary on Saint Paul’s Epistles to Timothy [Minneapolis, MN: Augsburg Publishing House, 1937] p.683).

 2018/9/12 7:10Profile
drifter
Member



Joined: 2005/6/6
Posts: 691
Campbell River, B.C.

 Re:

I'm only responsible for my own actions. If scripture tells me "those who preach the gospel should receive their living from the gospel" I believe it, the text is plain; and I will continue to support my pastor, who I know is a man of God and was led to quit his job as a policeman to go into ministry. Others can do as God leads them.


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Nigel Holland

 2018/9/12 13:25Profile





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