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PaulWest
Member



Joined: 2006/6/28
Posts: 3405
Dallas, Texas

 Re:

Gardiner's Bach Pilgrimage documentary is available in the US on Youtube. There are several other videos to view by him such as BWV 244, the Magnificat, etc. I definitely recommend checking out Helmut Rilling if you like faster tempi, the big choir sound and, crisp, modern instrumentation. He was the first to record the entire cycle of the Bach cantatas back in the 70's. Gardiner has some superior versions of individual cantatas as does Suzuki and Koopman.

Narrowpath, I am a classical guitarist as well. I studied classical guitar performance at the Boston Conservatory and played through the 4 lute suites. I am very familiar with the 6 violin sonatas and partitas and the cello suites. I've also played through the Anna Magdalena notebook and transcribed some of the two-part harpsichord inventions for solo guitar. I've also played a lot of Dowland. In recent years I've gotten away from performance and have started focusing on composition. I have a YouTube channel dedicated to my original guitar pieces, concertos, sinfonias, sonatas, harpsichord and chamber music, etc. I compose in a neobaroque style similar to Bach and Vivaldi. All to the glory of God and the edification of the soul.


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Paul Frederick West

 2013/8/23 9:18Profile









 Re:

Thanks Paul, though having trouble finding BWV 140 by Rilling. I saw his complete cantata set for only £65 on Amazon.

My son plays and builds lutes.

ps I found it and bought it. I do like the tempo a lot (and better accents!) but it will sound better on my hi-fi set up.

 2013/8/23 11:34
PaulWest
Member



Joined: 2006/6/28
Posts: 3405
Dallas, Texas

 Re:

You won't be disappointed! I love Rilling's cycle. Be sure to check out his BWV 10. I can listen to the introductory chorus endlessly. Bach was such a genius. I didn't know your son was a luthier. I have a great affinity for English and Italian lute music of the Rennaissance. S.L. Weiss was the great German baroque lutenist of his age, and he and Bach were good friends. I'm sure your son is familiar with his music.

Let me know when you receive the Rilling collection. It's something you'll cherish for the rest of your life. The CD liner notes are good too. The music is so absolutely stupendous, the English language doesn't have adequate superlatives to describe the splendour. It's the best of the best.


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Paul Frederick West

 2013/8/23 16:55Profile









 Re:

Thanks, I am looking forward to the postman arriving. In the meantime I have BWV 140 on cloud. I am very much enjoying hearing German singers, it is much more natural than the forced gutturals on the Garndiner recordings and makes a big difference for me, having become familiar with the German language through living in the country.

My son (I will let you know when he puts some of his music on youTube) is a big fan of Weiss. He is busy building his second lute.

 2013/8/24 3:01
PaulWest
Member



Joined: 2006/6/28
Posts: 3405
Dallas, Texas

 Re:

Here is the sublime BWV 10 - Bach's German Magnificant. The fourth introduction of the choir at 3:46 is a rare insight into the sounds of heaven. I can imagine the all the angelic hosts, all the seraphims and cherubims and redeemed saints in glory crying this music out. It reduces me to tears and trembling, breathless awe each time I hear it. My mortal frame can hardly bear it:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NlrsPW9jap8


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Paul Frederick West

 2013/8/26 11:37Profile









 Re:

Incredible. No music has ever moved me to tears like that of Bach. He surely is the greatest. That piece is all that you have described. Breathless awe indeed. 'Lost in wonder, love and praise.' My order arrives today and I eagerly await it but one speaker on my good headphones is playing up.

 2013/8/30 0:58









 Re:

My parcel has arrived, accompanied by "The Complete Cantatas" by Richard Stokes, so I am in for a glorious weekend.

 2013/8/30 4:36
ADisciple
Member



Joined: 2007/2/3
Posts: 835
Alberta, Canada

 Re:

Paul and Brenda, what do you think of Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor? I remember happening upon that years ago in a very dark time of my life... and was totally dumbstruck with awe. I felt something akin to fear that I couldn't identify at the time, but now know was the fear of God.

I still listen to it from time to time. Today here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEHGxpRoZQM

How can anyone listen to this and still be an unbeliever? All I could do at the end was cry out with tears in my eyes, Hallelujah!


Allan


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Allan Halton

 2013/8/30 11:49Profile
PaulWest
Member



Joined: 2006/6/28
Posts: 3405
Dallas, Texas

 Re:

BWV 565 (The beginning of the Toccata is the famous haunted mansion theme) is actually considered a spurious work today by many Bach specialists. It is for sure a youthful, virtuoso piece and very unique among Bach's known organ works from that time period (circa 1703-1708). The famous, dark introductory tocatta octaves, the extended "floating" motiffs in the middle of the fugue, the pedal-point theme - these are not typically found in the rest of his early organ works. So, there is a debate surrounding this piece, just because of its utter uniqueness. It may be by him (I think it is plausible, at least), but there is also a possibility it may not. Several cantatas once attributed to Bach have now been found to be by other composers (Like BWV 15).

One thing is certain though, it is a very bold, ingenious, fresh piece of music! Definitely north German style. The fugue's beginning is so wonderful; it spellbinds me each time. I've always thought that the advent of Johann Sebastian Bach is an atheist's nightmare. You have to basically commit intellectual suicide to postulate that this kind of music just "happened" through billions of years of random selection and genetic mutations (from which the human race began as primordial protezoa in a galactic ocean of space dust).


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Paul Frederick West

 2013/8/30 12:31Profile
PaulWest
Member



Joined: 2006/6/28
Posts: 3405
Dallas, Texas

 Re:

Here is the introduction of BWV 61 "Come Thou Redeemer of the Gentiles!"

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9GM2hpS64Sc

As a composer, let me tell you that this is music of another dimension.


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Paul Frederick West

 2013/8/30 12:52Profile





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