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mguldner
Member



Joined: 2009/12/4
Posts: 1860
Kansas

 Kenneth Hagin Sr.’s Renouncement of Word-Faith Teachings.

This maybe old news to many of you but I found it interesting in light of what is going on in todays world.

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Here is the link to Kenneth Hagin’s renouncement of the “Word-Faith” theology right before his death. It is significant, since he was viewed as an authority and called “Dad Hagin” from the leaders of the movement. In addition to the prosperity message, he also taught that it is NOT God’s will for anyone to be sick. To read the article go to the “Archives 3/07/08″):

Chrisma Magazine:http://www.charismamag.com/fireinmybones/Columns/show.php

Before he died in 2003, the revered father of the Word-Faith movement corrected his spiritual sons for going to extremes with their message of prosperity.

Charismatic Bible teacher Kenneth Hagin Sr. is considered the father of the so-called prosperity gospel. The folksy, self-trained “Dad Hagin” started a grass-roots movement in Oklahoma that produced a Bible college and a crop of famous preachers including Kenneth Copeland, Jerry Savelle, Charles Capps, Jesse DuPlantis, Creflo Dollar and dozens of others—all of whom teach that Christians who give generously should expect financial rewards on this side of heaven.

Hagin taught that God was not glorified by poverty and that preachers do not have to be poor. But before he died in 2003 and left his Rhema Bible Training Center in the hands of his son, Kenneth Hagin Jr., he summoned many of his colleagues to Tulsa to rebuke them for distorting his message. He was not happy that some of his followers were manipulating the Bible to support what he viewed as greed and selfish indulgence.


Those who were close to Hagin Sr. say he was passionate about correcting these abuses before he died. In fact, he wrote a brutally honest book to address his concerns. The Midas Touch was published in 2000, a year after the infamous Tulsa meeting.

Many Word-Faith ministers ignored the book. But in light of the recent controversy over prosperity doctrines, it might be a good idea to dust it off and read it again. Here are a few of the points Hagin made in The Midas Touch:

1. Financial prosperity is not a sign of God’s blessing. Hagin wrote: “If wealth alone were a sign of spirituality, then drug traffickers and crime bosses would be spiritual giants. Material wealth can be connected to the blessings of God or it can be totally disconnected from the blessings of God.”

2. People should never give in order to get. Hagin was critical of those who “try to make the offering plate some kind of heavenly vending machine.” He denounced those who link giving to getting, especially those who give cars to get new cars or who give suits to get new suits. He wrote: “There is no spiritual formula to sow a Ford and reap a Mercedes.”

3. It is not biblical to “name your seed” in an offering. Hagin was horrified by this practice, which was popularized in faith conferences during the 1980s. Faith preachers sometimes tell donors that when they give in an offering they should claim a specific benefit to get a blessing in return. Hagin rejected this idea and said that focusing on what you are going to receive “corrupts the very attitude of our giving nature.”

4. The “hundredfold return” is not a biblical concept. Hagin did the math and figured out that if this bizarre notion were true, “we would have Christians walking around with not billions or trillions of dollars, but quadrillions of dollars!” He rejected the popular teaching that a believer should claim a specific monetary payback rate.

5. Preachers who claim to have a “debt-breaking” anointing should not be trusted. Hagin was perplexed by ministers who promise “supernatural debt cancellation” to those who give in certain offerings. He wrote in The Midas Touch: “There is not one bit of Scripture I know about that validates such a practice. I’m afraid it is simply a scheme to raise money for the preacher, and ultimately it can turn out to be dangerous and destructive for all involved.”

(Many evangelists who appear on Christian television today use this bogus claim. Usually they insist that the miraculous debt cancellation will occur only if a person “gives right now,” as if the anointing for this miracle suddenly evaporates after the prime time viewing hour. This manipulative claim is more akin to witchcraft than Christian belief.)

Hagin condemned other hairbrained gimmicks designed to trick audiences into emptying their wallets. He was especially incensed when a preacher told his radio listeners that he would take their prayer requests to Jesus’ empty tomb in Jerusalem and pray over them there—if donors included a special love gift. “What that radio preacher really wanted was more people to send in offerings,” Hagin wrote.

Thanks to the recent resurgence in bizarre donation schemes promoted by American charismatics, the prosperity gospel is back under the nation’s microscope. It’s time to revisit Hagin’s concerns and find a biblical balance.

Hagin told his followers: “Overemphasizing or adding to what the Bible actually teaches invariably does more harm than good.” If the man who pioneered the modern concept of biblical prosperity blew the whistle on his own movement, wouldn’t it make sense for us to listen to his admonition?

[J. Lee Grady is editor of Charisma. The Midas Touch is available from Kenneth Hagin Ministries at rhema.org.]


_________________
Matthew Guldner

 2011/8/18 8:27Profile









 Re: Kenneth Hagin Sr.’s Renouncement of Word-Faith Teachings.

I commend him for speaking against the overemphasis of adding to what the bible actually teaches, the prosperity message wasn't the only issue. There was the idea in his book, "Jesus" that he explains to the reader how that Jesus Christ became demon possessed and when He rose from the grave, He was born again.

Pure Madness.

 2011/8/18 10:44
mguldner
Member



Joined: 2009/12/4
Posts: 1860
Kansas

 Re:

I saw youtube video of him promoting a book he wrote that basically took the time to explain that Jesus never claimed to be the messiah and so the Jews didn't really reject him or know they were rejecting the Messiah.


_________________
Matthew Guldner

 2011/8/18 10:47Profile
lylewise
Member



Joined: 2009/2/20
Posts: 494
Celina, Texas

 Re: Kenneth Hagin Sr.’s Renouncement of Word-Faith Teachings.

No, I for one have not heard of K.H. Sr's address of the PG.
Does he deal with any of the other heretical teachings that have come out of this movement or does he only address the PG. Not to minimize the the consequences of giving to get, just curious. I would have a hard time reading from this man, but what a wonderful warning from the death bed. One would be hard pressed, even as the forerunner of the WOF movement, to ask his wealthy disciples to enter through the eye of the needle when they have been so comfortably seduced and deceived by Mammon.

 2011/8/18 10:55Profile
AbideinHim
Member



Joined: 2006/11/26
Posts: 3589
Louisiana

 Re:

"There was the idea in his book, "Jesus" that he explains to the reader how that Jesus Christ became demon possessed and when He rose from the grave, He was born again."

I don't remember ever reading where Kenneth Hagin said that "Jesus Christ became demon possessed", but what he did say, which was a popular teaching among the WOF teachers, was that Jesus died spiritually. This is a false teaching in itself.

I was involved in WOF teaching for many years and many of the teachings on faith were scriptural, and I had a greater appreciation and knowledge of the Word of God that was a result of these teachings. However, what started out as a good thing that the Body of Christ needed turned out to be harmful for many due to the overemphasis on prosperity teaching. Faith became a means to an end, and the blessing side was overemphasized to the exclusion of the teachings of Jesus on discipleship and dying to self.

Mike


_________________
Mike

 2011/8/18 10:57Profile









 Re:

God can not die spiritually. He can not die, period.

That puts that to rest.

I too was deceived by WOF for many years. I absolutely loathe the WOF movement.

Krispy

 2011/8/18 11:16









 Re: The root of the WOF heresy....Another Jesus.


Kenneth Hagin was deeply influenced by errant Bible Theologian E. W, Kenyon...the Grandfather of the Word of Faith Movement.
...............Wikipedia below....
One of the first proponents of Word of Faith was E. W. Kenyon. A New England Bible teacher, schoolmaster, and prolific writer, Kenyon authored eighteen books that are used still today by many who call themselves Word of Faith.

Word of Faith teaching emerged as a reaction to traditional Pentecostalism, which taught the idea of the power of God displayed in the present day by acts of healing, miracles, and so on. These spiritual manifestations were unpredictable and took place as "the Lord willed."

!!!In contrast to this, Kenyon taught that supernatural acts could be GUARANTEED to happen based on a covenant between God and his people.!!!...[ Thus by just NAMING it, and Claiming it, It is yours....by Covenant.]BT

At the core of Kenyon's teachings was the concept of the Old and New Testaments as blood covenants. A blood covenant is a contract that binds two parties together as one "blood", or family, and pledges them to the mutual interest and prosperity of one another.

This kind of covenant would be symbolized by a "covenant cut" and the spilling of blood, for example with circumcision in Genesis 17:10[bible 5]. In Genesis 17[bible 6], a covenant is established by God with Abram and his descendants, the future Israel.

!!! God pledges himself to the well being of Israel including protection from violence, sickness, poverty (which meant overall financial prosperity), etc.!!!

[It is this deception that was at the core of Hagin's heresy..that apart from the Spirit...by means of the fact that God said it....We could tap into His power and blessing by reciting His Promises.] BT

In return Israel was expected to "fully obey" and pledge itself to the interests and service of God;[3] for example, in blessing the nations in Genesis 12:3[bible 7]. With the belief that Christians are heirs to that covenant by identification with Abraham's descendants through Jesus Christ in Galatians 3:29[bible 8]. From Kenyon's perspective, interpreting the scriptures in this way meant that the supernatural could be GUARANTEED! whenever necessary to fulfill God's "covenant promises" to his people.

Kenneth Hagin was heavily influenced by Kenyon’s writings. Hagin has been referred to as the “father” of the modern Word of Faith movement. He elaborated on Kenyon’s theology of covenant confession, preaching a four-part formula for receiving God’s promises:

“Say it; do it; receive it; tell it!”!!!!!..Kenneth Hagin

[.Selfish , arrogant Narcissism...where God becomes that golf-ball size magic power in your pocket that you wield upon the World to gain constant Health, Happiness and Prosperity. Strange...but in my several Gospel trips to India, where 750,000 Hindi demon gods are worshipped...[ and everywhere in mini-idol form...].....This is precisely what the masses of poor expect from their worship.....and financial giving to the pagan priests expedites the blessing....]..BT

Many Bible preachers and teachers have been influenced either directly or indirectly by Kenneth Hagin and his teaching. The most recognized include Kenneth Copeland, Benny Hinn, Creflo Dollar, Joyce Meyer, Jerry Savelle, Bill Winston, Joel Osteen, Charles Nieman, and Hobart Freeman, AND Jesse Duplantis......Wikipedia


Faith in your own Word of faith, or Faith that your flesh will be blessed because you mentally join yourself with your lusts to GET...is no faith at all. It's a world of demons they think are named Jesus...a false Messiah.BT

 2011/8/18 12:14
AbideinHim
Member



Joined: 2006/11/26
Posts: 3589
Louisiana

 Re:

"I saw youtube video of him promoting a book he wrote that basically took the time to explain that Jesus never claimed to be the messiah and so the Jews didn't really reject him or know they were rejecting the Messiah."

Brother, when I was involved with the Word of faith teaching, I spent many hours listening to the teachings of Kenneth Hagin. We even took vacations in Tulsa where the the July Campmeetings were held. I never heard Kenneth Hagin ever make a statement that "Jesus never claimed to be the messiah". What is the name of the book in which he supposedly made that statement?

I praise God that the Lord opened my eyes just as He did with some of you concerning much of the erroneous teaching that the WOF teachers were putting forth. I have been very critical of the false teachings that had many in the Body of Christ chasing after "your best life now" and were left spiritually bankrupt. Kenneth Hagin sincerely tried to steer the movement in the right direction that the Lord had intended at it's conception. Unfortuneately, I don't believe that many of the teachers listened to him. After all, who can argue with success? Success was the hook that the enemy used to deceive many. There are many ungodly men that use faith principles that are what men would call a success. We are going to need faith in the end times to get the basic needs of life met. God's intention was that His children would seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, then all of these other things would be added to them.

Mike




Mike


_________________
Mike

 2011/8/18 12:22Profile









 Re:

That is what people think... "who can argue with success?"

To quote our pastor: "Sometimes your financial success is actually a curse from God on your life, and not a blessing."

Krispy

 2011/8/18 13:28
lylewise
Member



Joined: 2009/2/20
Posts: 494
Celina, Texas

 Re:

Rather a test?

Thanks BT and Mike for the insight.

 2011/8/18 14:58Profile





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