SermonIndex Audio Sermons
Image Map
See Opportunities to Serve with SermonIndex
Discussion Forum : Scriptures and Doctrine : Right hand Bible, left hand commentary?

Print Thread (PDF)

Goto page ( 1 | 2 Next Page )
PosterThread









 Right hand Bible, left hand commentary?

With so many books advertized and so many ways to be distracted, lately, I have been wondering about cutting down to just my bible for awhile...but I would also like a good commentary.

Does anyone have a suggestion for the best one on the market?...in all of history...

Henry? MacArthur? ... what does/did Poonen use?


Blessings,
BrianMira

 2009/4/26 8:55









 Re: Right hand Bible, left hand commentary?

Hi Brian & Mira. Praying you both are well.
I'd like to suggest just downloading e-sword if you haven't already and just using Torrey's "Treasury of Scriptural Knowledge" - Robertson's Word Pictures and any Dictionary offered, like the King James Concordance and with the KJV+ numbered to the Strong's.
I think "word studies" in the original languages oneself and the help of the cross-referencing in Torrey's book is better than commentaries. Besides, it's free. :-)

 2009/4/26 23:00
Drawn2Jesus
Member



Joined: 2009/4/2
Posts: 6


 Re: Right hand Bible, left hand commentary?

Hello, I would like to recommend a great Bible and commentary in one called the "life in the Spirit study bible" formerly the "Full life study bible".It's put out by Zondervon. It's been a real blessing to me and my brothers and sisters in the Lord and is full of many enlightening articles on various and sensitive bible topics it gives a straight forward scriptural perspective on the word of God with many scriptural references to bolster any comments made. If you believe in sanctification and spiritual purity and holiness as a standard for God's people I would strongly recommend this study bible. As you know no commentary is inerrant but this study bible comes as close as I've seen to the Spirit that has inspired the written word of God. God bless you in Christ,Howie. :-)


_________________
Howard Blank

 2009/4/26 23:19Profile
TaylorOtwell
Member



Joined: 2006/6/19
Posts: 927
Arkansas

 Re:

Great question.

Matthew Henry is very "devotional", but also has good insights into the text.

Matthew Poole is briefer than Henry, and more focused on simply expositing the text. He usually doesn't elaborate as much as Henry.

John Gill is really solid. But pretty hefty at 8 volumes.

If I were going to pick one commentary set for the whole Bible, it would be hard for me to pick between John Gill and Matthew Henry. C.H. Spurgeon said that he would take Matthew Poole over any other set.

I would also mention John Calvin's commentaries, but he did not write one for every book in the Bible. However, the books he did finish are very good as well.


_________________
Taylor Otwell

 2009/4/26 23:31Profile









 Re: am I confused??????

Thank You, ALL.



I am wondering if I am asking about the right book; I know the difference between a commentary and a concordance...which should I be focusing on having in my left hand?! (more so than the other)

 2009/4/27 0:31
BeYeDoers
Member



Joined: 2005/11/17
Posts: 370
Bloomington, IN

 Re:

I think a good concordance will be much more valuable than a commentary. Your best bet is a KJV bible with a Strong's exhaustive. If you prefer "modern" English, go with a NASB; Zondervan has an exhaustive NASB concordance that is very good.

As far as commentaries (if you are looking), I second the e-sword idea. For what it's worth (not much I'm sure), I really am not impressed with John Gill or John MacArthur. Their theology clearly gets in the way of their exegesis in many instances, and they are not always very honest with the text. I agree with TaylorOrtwell that Henry can be a little too devotional at times, but he is very good, and tends to be very humble and more honest with the text than most.

In summary: go with a Bible/concordance, it will take you much farther.


_________________
Denver McDaniel

 2009/4/27 0:44Profile
JoanM
Member



Joined: 2008/4/7
Posts: 797


 Re: "The best in all of history": The Word of God with the Spirit of God

Commentaries: I have come to appreciate some commentaries as a way to have fellowship with other believers.

Please do not misunderstand me. There is a place for commentaries and surely God uses them. But man is also likely to use them, and sometimes poorly. Many pastors point to the time they lost what turned out to be crucial communion with God by seeking out commentaries in preparing messages for those under their care. The growth of many “students” is stunted when think they have settled the issue (never true) having read a honestly great commentary.

When you ask which ONE commentary you should you choose, (“the best in all of history”), you may be asking which ONE has heard the most (more extensively, deepest truth, etc.) from the Holy Spirit. You might do best to never read them until long, long after you have heard from the Holy Spirit of God yourself. Your post suggests that you may even have had enough of commentaries for a while (God leading you?). I am sure you know that the writers of any commentaries you would want to read (“the best in all of history”) did just that, heard directly. Why would we want something “second-hand.” It is not that there is not truth in commentaries. Truth can be learned in several ways. But God IS Jealous and first-hand IS best. There is no way that you can forget first-hand revelation. It is living truth. There is the intimacy with God. The increased prayer. There is no question God has fed you. You have asked and He has answered. You can grow greatly in recognizing Him, how He leads. The indwelling Spirit of God knows exactly what and when to teach you very specific Truth for your growth and usefulness and God's glory.

[u]This is a long post for a short caution[/u]. What I would really like to know Brian, and what I am thanking God for, is What God is wanting to reveal to you that He brings you to the point of this question?

 2009/4/27 3:23Profile









 Re:

Quote:

JoanM wrote:

[u]This is a long post for a short caution[/u]. What I would really like to know Brian, and what I am thanking God for, is What God is wanting to reveal to you that He brings you to the point of this question?



I appreciate your caution.

I think my first mistake was in stating commentary rather than concordance... other than that, I believe God 'is wanting to reveal' Him to me, which is why I asked the question.

Yes, I understand your point about the Holy Spirit. Actually, I was waiting for someone to point that out.

I just need some help with the connection of scriptures, which I believe is the purpose of the concordance.

Thank you though... I am seeking Him and hope to more and more and more.

Blessings,
BrianMira

 2009/4/27 3:37









 Re: Right hand Bible, left hand commentary?

Hi Brian,

Quote:
I just need some help with the connection of scriptures, which I believe is the purpose of the concordance.

I used to use Young's concordance (which now comes with Strong's numbers), [i]because[/i] it doesn't offer any opinion at all. But, the section for some words are very long, which makes Bible study comparatively laborious, although not without the benefits of the hidden gems one discovers on the way - such as the different Hebrew words with their specific meanings, which seem to arrive in English sounding the same.

(I find Young's Literal Translation helpful and full of the love of God, as well as dense in places. Sometimes he is far more direct than the KJV - for instance, in translating what Jesus said to the Pharisees. He is consistently useful in understanding the tense of verbs, and, the definite and indefinite article.)

To speed up this process, I now use www.olivetree.com's online Bible search (link at foot of their homepage screen), which allows a phrase of up to four words [i]or[/i] a chapter, or, a chapter and verse to be searched for. I've never used their facility to compare different versions of one verse, but it can be done quite easily.

(The main translation not included in their options, is the NIV, for which very occasionally I use www.biblegateway.com to search.)

The Newberry Bible, with its excellent introduction and notes on the Hebrew, is, sadly, not online; but Tyndale's New Testament in modern English is, (I think - possibly in breach of copyright), both of which help one to follow the [i]thought[/i] of the writers. Ron Bailey has put Tyndale online with Old English spelling.

Latterly, I've taken an interest in the Greek alphabet, to isolate a word I want to study from the online Interlinear (Berry's) in olivetree.com. One then can search Strong's number on that word, (probably less rather than more spiritual), and, one can search for all the places that particular word (or root of it) occurs in the New Testament.

Similarly, one can search an online Septuagint for the Greek translation of the Hebrew, to see how the usage changes in the New Testament, if it appears there at all. (This may be a bit of a blunt instrument, but it definitely helps to seive out the [i]English[/i] when it doesn't communicate clearly.) The more I write, the more I realise I'm not answering your question!

It depends what you mean by 'connection of scriptures'. Definitely, the Holy Spirit will stop you at a word or verse He wants you to delve into, and will remind you of revelation you've had before, as much as give you revelation you've [i]never[/i] had before. The minister can take others only as far as he has gone himself - which I feel must be quite obvious from these comments!

God bless you!

Perhaps there is a reasonably priced cd containing a stock of these resources, which would then run on a laptop or pc without the internet? The only problem I've noticed in the past with such cds, is they often contain more reading than you will live to complete.



 2009/4/27 10:30
TaylorOtwell
Member



Joined: 2006/6/19
Posts: 927
Arkansas

 Re:

I think the people in this thread bring up some interesting points.

I don't think one needs to make concordances and commentaries mutually exclusive. I think, ultimately, it would be wise to own both (whether through e-Sword or print is up to you).

I don't mean to be contentious or wish to start an argument, but would like to present perhaps a different view of using commentaries than many on this site would advocate. I used to be of the notion that one shouldn't use a commentary until they've "heard from the Holy Spirit" themselves. I don't think you will really find any support for this Biblically. What I see in the Scripture is that we are to use the means available to us in order to understand the Scriptures, and we are to use the resources passed down to us by our fathers in the faith. So, if you don't understand a portion of Scripture, grab a commentary and don't feel bad about it. Thank the Lord for allowing us to have these resources and thank the Lord for working through these resources to enlighten our minds and hearts.

With care in Christ,
Taylor


_________________
Taylor Otwell

 2009/4/27 13:11Profile





©2002-2021 SermonIndex.net
Promoting Genuine Biblical Revival.
Affiliate Disclosure | Privacy Policy