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Discussion Forum : News and Current Events : Plague, Medieval Scourge, on the Rise

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ginnyrose
Member



Joined: 2004/7/7
Posts: 7486
Mississippi

 Re:

Quote:
We have this section of the planet secured ... perhaps we could hire her out



Naw, Mike, you should just crank up the cat-producing factory and see what you can do to eliminate the rodent problem. Man, there may yet be millions made!

Ya sure you will not have some crackpot protest that pic?! I love it, so that means I am no crackpot! :-) But really, if you have plenty of cats around mice and rats will be no problem. Simple. Mom has likely twenty on her farm and even though she feeds them catfood they have no mice problem that I know of.

Katy, did you really buy your daughter a python? Oh, dear, now snakes I cannot stand. On the other hand if an area has plenty of snakes, there will be fewer rodents. In my immediate vicinity, snakes are made history ASAP after I see them! I do not mind their existance, but I do very much mind seeing them!

:-)

ginnyrose


_________________
Sandra Miller

 2008/1/19 19:23Profile
Talkn2u
Member



Joined: 2006/12/31
Posts: 196


 Re:

That is so cute...look how proud she is of her "catch"...

 2008/1/19 22:58Profile
ginnyrose
Member



Joined: 2004/7/7
Posts: 7486
Mississippi

 Re: Plague, Medieval Scourge, on the Rise

Katy,

This article has been on my mind all day...

I am still wondering whether this pestilence the article is talking about is not largely due to man and his stupidity. So now you have nature running amuck.

We were raised on the farm, still have close ties to American agriculture. My Dh gets "Acres, USA" magazine, one devoted to organic farming. It is very antagonistic to the modern use of chemicals in agriculture, the use of GMO seeds and government meddling in the farming business. So I read it with a sense of caution.

Having said all this, I am also reading elsewhere that the alarms Acres,USA is raising is not without merit. Food grown today is not as nutritious as that grown 40 years ago; GMO grains are not liked by wildlife and not as nutritious. The suitability of cloned meat to be used by humans is questioned even by the general public. The feds do not allow raw milk to be sold privately by a dairyman (government meddling in private enterprise) even though it is healthier (my grandchildren have been raised drinking raw milk and so have a lot of others I know, like us). And the most ridiculous 'concern' by whackos is the gas passed by cattle as having an effect on the ozone. (Wonder what they will do about people who pass gas?!)

This is just for starters. When man works to change God's creation by manipulating it with cloning, seems to me we are being set up for a huge reaping of the which will spell disaster for all concerned. So, this is why I wondered whether this catastrophe is not largely man-made, allowed by God to demonstrate to all his foolishness.

My thoughts...

ginnyrose


_________________
Sandra Miller

 2008/1/20 19:52Profile
crsschk
Member



Joined: 2003/6/11
Posts: 9192
Santa Clara, CA

 Rats and cats

Quote:
That is so cute...look how proud she is of her "catch"...



And an even prouder daddy... :-)

It is difficult to make too light of this however, agree with our brother. The Black Plauge is almost unfathomnable to read about, seems almost ... fantastical it was so devestating.


_________________
Mike Balog

 2008/1/20 21:06Profile









 Re:

Mike, is that your cat in the picture......Yes Loved it!

ginnyrose,

I know there is a verse in Revelation about man destroying the earth, and have always wondered about that verse. Could it mean all these things we our of our own carelessness are doing...pollution, dumping waste in the lakes and rivers.

My Father worked for the Atomic Energy Commission, Hanford, in Washington State for many rears before they closed it down. It was built exactly like the one in Russia Chernobyl (SP) that had its mishap. While out there, he came down with Graves Disease. Yes, it was related.

A recent acquaintance, who is from Spokane WA told me about his mother and uncle both coming down with MS at the same time..hummmm and how many there have very strange illnesses.

Yes, I do think we are responsible for making a mes of things.

Loved your comment on cow gas :-P , but is it on the rise due to what they are being fed?

I've also wondered about girls becoming physically more mature in our day, and if all teh hormones being fed to chicken and such might have something to do with that, as well as women going into **earlier retirement** (menopause) then our Mothers.

I agree, man has been foolish, and even when warned, continues his foolishness with little regard to these warnings.

There are so many issues at hand, with little regard for our children and theirs to have to deal with. If it's too big for us, i'm sure it will be for them as well.

I heard plagues are brought on by droughts. I am still researching this area too. But it would be both a combination of stronger strains due to resistance built up, with what does seem to be strange weather patterns.

We have 45 days of water left (I live in Atlanta, GA). Have NO WATERING of anykind, and have for months. The water pressure here is turned down, so it takes me 10 minutes to fill a coffee pot, and it takes 5 times longer to run a modest bath.

There is no such thing as Mother Nature...well,she was a pagan goddess, so we know all these things are in God's hands, weather wise.

Many issues we are having to deal with, and I do believe it is the beginning of the signs of the times. People will laugh and say life goes in cycles, but at this rapid a pace????

Just my thoughts,
Katy


 2008/1/20 21:54









 Re:

Quote:
Loved your comment on cow gas , but is it on the rise due to what they are being fed



Actually I hope it is on the rise! Sorry ozone layer!!

Katy

 2008/1/20 21:57









 Re:


More info, interesting!!!


It was 229 years after the Great Plague dealt London such a terrible blow that the probable cause of the disease was discovered. In 1894, during an epidemic in Hong Kong, two rival research teams – one led by the Japanese scientist Shibasaburo Kitasato and the other by the Frenchman Alexandre Yersin, a former pupil of Louis Pasteur – isolated the bacillus Pasteurella pestis (now called Yersinia pestis) that is responsible for plague.

Further research showed that this was a disease of black rats and other rodents, spread by their fleas. When all the rats died, the fleas would frantically look for new hosts: human beings. The plague bacillus is extremely virulent. Laboratory mice die after being infected with just three bacilli – and fleas can disgorge up to 24,000 in one bite.

The different types of the plague

There are three human types of the disease.

Bubonic plague is the most common. A flea bite deposits the bacilli into the body's lymphatic system. As a result, the disease is characterised by 'buboes', large, inflamed and painful swellings in the lymph glands of the groin, armpits or neck, depending on where the flea bite occurred. Historically, 60% of all those infected died of bubonic plague.

In septicaemic plague, which is almost invariably fatal, the bacilli enter the bloodstream directly, rather than the lymphatic system where they might be contained. Like bubonic plague, the septicaemic variety is caused directly by flea bites.

Pneumonic plague is the most deadly: it is usually fatal and it does not require flea bites to spread. When the bacilli reach the lungs, severe pneumonia occurs, and the bacilli are present in the water droplets spread by coughs and on clothing. Thus it is highly contagious, especially in crowded, poorly ventilated buildings.

Death occurs quickly with pneumonic plague – within three or four days – and even faster with the septicaemic type: 24 hours. In all three, internal bleeding causes large bruises to appear on the skin – hence the plague's name in the 14th century, the Black Death.

It is widely believed that the Great Plague's memory lives on in the nursery rhyme 'Ring-a-ring o' roses': the 'roses' refer to the red spots that appear over the buboes, and 'A-tishoo! A-tishoo! We all fall down!' recalls the violent coughing and swift death that accompanies pneumonic plague.

A cure for the plague

In 1932, with sulphonamide drugs, there was finally an effective treatment for the plague. Yet, within 50 years, there were reports – persistent, though unconfirmed – that a strain of plague bacillus resistant to all medicinal and control measures had been developed for bacteriological warfare by the US army.

Plague is still endemic in parts of Asia and, surprisingly, in the western United States, where it is spread by squirrels, prairie dogs, chipmunks and other rodents and infected family pets. In 1992 (the latest figures), the World Health Organisation reported 108 deaths from 1,768 cases of bubonic plague worldwide. There is a vaccine, but because it takes several weeks to become effective, it is of little use in an epidemic.

A new theory?

In a new book – Biology of Plagues (Cambridge University Press, 2001, £65) – Susan Scott and Christopher J Duncan have challenged the belief that bubonic plague is caused by a bacillus carried by fleas travelling on black rats.

Scott researched the parish records of the small town of Penrith in Cumbria and discovered that, not only did plague reach this far outpost of England in the Middle Ages, but it had a definite spread from person to person within households. In addition, black rats would have not been present – they tend to congregate in areas of high human habitation, especially seaports, and in more temperate climes – and the only other likely animal carrier, the brown rat, did not arrive in Penrith until about 1720.

From this information, the two authors have concluded that the bubonic plague that affected Penrith was an infectious disease – that is, one spread from person to person – not a rat/flea-borne one. When they looked for a modern equivalent, they plumped for the Ebola and Marburg viruses, two of the most infectious and lethal viruses known today.

STOP PRESS

In October 2001, the science journal Nature announced that the complete genetic structure of the bacilli responsible for the plague has been unravelled by scientists at the Sanger Centre in Cambridge (UK). This new knowledge will help in the search for treatments for the disease and to combat a possible weapon of bio-terrorism.

 2008/1/20 22:48
ginnyrose
Member



Joined: 2004/7/7
Posts: 7486
Mississippi

 Re:

Katy,

Looks like we are on the same page here about the endtimes...I also think the end time catastrophes are so vast that what we are saying is but a tiny, tiny bit of a multiple-faceted scenario that we can barely fathom.

Anyhow, my puny brain keeps thinking....

Have you noticed how so many children are coming down with diabetes? When I was a child in the 50s (b. in 1947) I knew of only ONE diabetic child! How many do you know today? And how about asthma? Never heard of it back then. I had a couple cousins with allergies but they were unusual...

Interesting you mentioned girls' early maturing...this phenomenon has been noted by experts as well. Some say diet contributes to it, others suggest longer exposure to lighting does. Once I asked the older ladies in church when they started menses and the ages they mentioned were 16+! And that was normal!

Experts are now saying mothers have been exercising too much sanitation with their children. They have not allowed them to be exposed to enough germs which allows their bodies to build up immunity or antibodies in their systems thus making them vulnerable to more diseases.

Ya know what these modern children need? The freedom to run with the cows and chickens and pigs and get dirty, smelly and go wade in the water that who knows what critters have enjoyed as well! Sound gross? Likely to city folks, but hey! that is where I grew up in as did our children and they are healthy. And so am I. Still this may not be adequate....so what is the answer?

You still do not have much water? Maybe you will have to collect water from your downspouts? You are getting some rain now, are you not? I know you will need a lot to rain to make up the deficit you have. Last year we got only half of the normal rainfall. Since it has been raining a lot now, the ph in the water my DH uses in the greenhouses is lower. He does not have to use as much battery acid to lower it. He also uses rainwater, collected from the gutters, if he has it.

I do not know why the concern about cattle passing gas...I wondered too if it was because of what they were being fed - maybe it is because they were fed "Round-up-ready corn"? Now if this could be proven, it might give Monsanto a run for their money! Initially, I was sure the concern was voiced by some city -slicker working to justify some government grant he got!

Just my thoughts...which mean that having lived for 60 years and having witnessed the changes we see it does give me cause for concern. But the greatest problem in not material, it is spiritual: people calling bad good and good bad: the world is in the church and is very comfortable with it. THIS to me is the greatest tragedy.

Blessings,
ginnyrose


_________________
Sandra Miller

 2008/1/21 0:11Profile
SimpleLiving
Member



Joined: 2008/1/11
Posts: 375
Minnesota, USA

 Re:

Let's not forget about the comeback of the dreaded, horrid [i]bedbug[/i]! They were all but wiped-out, but they're back with a vengeance! I came against them in prayer when they showed up in the apartment building I live in. They never came into my apartment, even though, daily, I was in the apartment of an elderly gentleman helping him deal with his problem with them. Ultimately, he had to throw everything out.

----

Now, back to the regularly scheduled kitty conversation already in progress...

I have a three year old cat that I adopted from the Humane Society when he was only six weeks old. (I'll [i]never[/i] get a kitten again! Ouch!)

His name is Silly and he lives up to it. He absolutely LOVES everyone. He loves to give hugs and tours of the apartment when people first come in! I'm not kidding! He's never hissed, scratched, or bit anyone. He's an absolute love bug and I couldn't imagine life without him.


_________________
Keith

 2008/1/21 0:23Profile
SimpleLiving
Member



Joined: 2008/1/11
Posts: 375
Minnesota, USA

 Re:

Quote:
Looks like we are on the same page here about the endtimes...I also think the end time catastrophes are so vast that what we are saying is but a tiny, tiny bit of a multiple-faceted scenario that we can barely fathom.



The time of His return is so near. There is no more time to waste - not that there ever [i]was[/i] time to waste! I used to pray for His return and that it would be soon because I'm so tired of this return. But now, I pray that He tarries and gives me time to grow old and die a natural death. There is so much work to be done and I am only 41 years old! Lord willing, I can live for 50 more years, doing His will! What a privilege that would be! But, I don't think this wretched world has that much time left. If I make it to 50, I'll be in shock!

- There were 2,000 years between Adam and Abraham. (Or is it Moses?)
- There were 2,000 years between Abraham and Jesus.
- There have been 2,000 years already between Jesus and His soon return.

It took six days to create the world and on the seventh day God rested. In Genesis, it says that a day is as a thousand years and a thousand years is as a day. The Old Testament always foreshadowed the New Testament. If this is true, those days mentioned above would be six days that God "leased" the earth to man. This would mean that His return is literally at the door because the seventh day, or seventh thousand years, is considered the Millennial Reign of Christ, after Jesus' return.

This is a teaching by Charles Capps. I don't know much about him or his teachings, whether or not He is Godly, but it was a very interesting teaching to listen to.


_________________
Keith

 2008/1/21 0:41Profile





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