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Discussion Forum : General Topics : What's going on in the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in Atlanta ?

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Sems
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Joined: 2005/6/23
Posts: 38
Latvia

 What's going on in the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in Atlanta ?

Does anyone know what is happening with Earl Paulk ?


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Samuel Thomas

 2006/2/2 11:51Profile









 Re: What's going on in the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in Atlanta ?

The following is from http://www.charismanow.com/11-04-05/

Just a side note, Earl Paulk is a false teacher, propogating the heresies of the Word of Faith Movement, including the so-called "Kingdom Now" theology.

For those who will no doubt rail against me for posting this publicly... everything I am posting came from the Charismatic Movement most widely read magazine, and everything about Paulk is a matter of public record.

Krispy

[b]Ashamed and Outraged in Atlanta[/b]
by J. Lee Grady
Chrisma Online (part of Chrisma Magazine)

Upset by a lawsuit filed against Bishop Earl Paulk Jr., pastors in the Atlanta area are calling for higher standards of morality in church leadership

Accusations of sexual misconduct have followed Bishop Earl Paulk Jr. and his Atlanta-based ministry for years, ever since he was accused of adultery in 1960. But Paulk always bounced back, denying the charges and sometimes taking legal action against his accusers.

Most pastors in the Atlanta area kept quiet, and national Christian leaders didn’t get involved in what they viewed as a local problem. No church court investigated the charges, mainly because Paulk’s ministry has been independent of denominational accountability since he left the Church of God (Cleveland, Tenn.) more than 40 years ago.

But bishops in a loosely controlled network Paulk has led since 1982, the International Communion of Charismatic Churches (ICCC), asked Paulk to step down from his post as archbishop last month. And earlier this week a group of pastors in the Atlanta area broke their silence by issuing a statement of apology for alleged abuses of power at Paulk’s church.

The Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in suburban Atlanta (also called The Cathedral at Chapel Hill) is known for its racial diversity, creative arts programs and massive, neo-Gothic sanctuary where Paulk blended charismatic and liturgical worship styles. The congregation was on its way to becoming the city’s most prominent charismatic church.

But in 1992 a church member went public with accusations that she was pressured into a sexual relationship with Paulk’s brother, Don Paulk, who served as senior pastor. He admitted an affair and resigned but was reinstated three weeks later. The same year several women alleged that a church staff member sexually harassed them during counseling sessions. Another female staff member claimed in 1993 that she had a sexual relationship with Earl Paulk Jr.

In 2001, yet another female church member filed a lawsuit claiming that the bishop sexually molested her when she was a child and later when she was a teenager. That suit was settled out of court in 2003.
The church continued its ministry, although in 1992 membership dropped by half, from 12,000 to 6,000. Paulk denied wrongdoing and refused to grant media interviews, but he continued to lead the ICCC until last month.

Today the 78-year-old pastor faces what could be the most difficult test of his career. A former parishioner, Mona Brewer, has alleged in a lawsuit filed in August that Paulk forced her to have sex with him and others—including visiting charismatic preachers.

Brewer, who filed the suit with her husband, Bobby, served on the staff of the cathedral with her husband. She claims that around 1989 Paulk began to require her to have sex with him, “other members of the church community [and] leaders of other churches as well as his family members, sometimes with other individuals observing the sexual acts,” the lawsuit says.

Bradley White, 49, pastor of City Harvest Worship Center, and Johnny Enlow, 46, pastor of Daystar International Christian Fellowship are two of the ministers rallying Atlanta pastors around a statement of apology. They helped form a group called Christians Who Care and are enlisting church leaders to speak out.

The statement apologizes to women who were “betrayed, victimized, abused and wounded by sexually inappropriate actions” and states: “We repent for being afraid to get involved in helping bring the truth of what has been happening for a long time into the light while the media exposed and mocked what should have been handled by the authority of Christ in the church.”

Enlow says he speaks for a growing number of pastors who are signing the statement. “Christian leaders who see unrighteousness done in the name of Christ simply cannot sit back and say nothing,” Enlow says.

Rev. Larry Tomczak, pastor of Christ the King Church of Greater Atlanta, said he grieves over what has happened to the victims. “Having been in the city for 10 years, I wish we had reached out to these women,” said Tomczak. “We should have taken initiative and provided a refuge for restoration.”

The lawsuit filed by Bobby and Mona Brewer is currently moving forward in Dekalb County Superior Court, and dozens of witnesses are going through a deposition process. Bobby Brewer told Charisma last month that he and his wife filed the suit “to give victims a voice.”

Meanwhile, the acting head of the ICCC, David Huskins of Cedartown, Ga., says Paulk’s Oct. 12 resignation from the international network will trigger reforms in the movement, which represents churches in 26 countries.

“It is time for new leadership,” Haskins said. Acknowledging a “dangerous trend of independence in the charismatic movement,” Haskins said the ICCC will adopt new bylaws during a meeting in mid-November that will allow the group to bring discipline and correction when ministers violate moral or theological standards.

[i]J. Lee Grady is editor of Charisma and an award-winning journalist. He writes a column for Charisma Online twice a week. To view the entire statement published by Christians Who Care, go to www.christianswhocare.net. To subscribe to Charisma Online and be entered for monthly book giveaways, click here.[/i]

 2006/2/2 12:24
dohzman
Member



Joined: 2004/10/13
Posts: 2132


 Re: What's going on in the Cathedral of the Holy Spirit in Atlanta ?

Don't know much about the man personally, but I do know that his doctrine is pretty far off the mark. In the apostles day they would have marked him as an heretic, but here in watered down christian American 2006 we would label him as in error. Here's an interesting website you can look at the gives alot of information on him.
www.apologeticsindex.org/151-earl-paulk-cathedral-at-chapel-hill


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D.Miller

 2006/2/2 12:27Profile
Billy7
Member



Joined: 2005/8/9
Posts: 61


 Re:

Here is a follow-up article on this issue that was posted on Charisma's web site a few days ago:

http://www.charismanow.com/01-31-06/

Lessons from the Earl Paulk Scandal

By J. Lee Grady

If we don’t learn from the mistakes made at Cathedral of the Holy Spirit, this ugly scandal in Atlanta will repeat itself.

Last Sunday the headline on the front page of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution made the city groan: “SEX CHARGES CAST PALL ON BISHOP PAULK.” The lengthy story about charismatic pastor Earl Paulk Jr. and his Cathedral of the Holy Spirit read like a steamy sex novel, only in this case the main character is a minister who allegedly lured women into adulterous affairs—and in some cases asked a woman to have sex with another visiting preacher.

Many people were quoted in the report, including Mona Brewer and Cindy Hall, two women who said they were involved sexually with Paulk for years, sometimes meeting him in parking lots and then driving to his home for sex. Missing from the story were any quotes from Paulk himself, who is 78 and currently recovering from major surgery.

I’m still waiting for a statement of apology from the bishop. I’ve been waiting 13 years, ever since the first round of allegations surfaced from a group of women who said they were his victims. More allegations were made public in 2001, when another female church member filed a lawsuit claiming that Paulk molested her when she was a child and later when she was a teenager.

There was no public statement from Paulk after that incident, either. The lawsuit was settled out of court. Meanwhile Paulk chastised the media—including Charisma—and said his critics were demonic agents bent on destroying him.

Paulk needs to apologize to us, to his local church, to the denomination he left in 1960 and to the larger body of Christ. And most of all to his victims, one of whom said she felt suicidal after Paulk allegedly told her that sexual intimacy with him would “resurrect” his ministry.

For years the rumors have circulated about immorality at Paulk’s mammoth church—which in its heyday had 12,000 members. Today anyone who knew of the sexual scandals, including many Paulk family members, has been summoned to a suburban Atlanta courtroom for lengthy depositions. The ugly story is unraveling.

Yet we still have no public apology from Paulk. I hope and pray that before Paulk meets his Maker he will make things right.

Meanwhile, I am begging church leaders to take a long, hard look at this situation and create new policies. We need assurance that what has been happening in Atlanta for so many years is not repeated.

I talked this week with David Huskins, 39, who was elected to head the International Communion of Charismatic Churches (ICCC), the network that Paulk founded in 1982. Huskins has endured plenty of shell shock since November, when he faced the seriousness of the charges against Paulk and then asked him to resign.

Today, as Huskins takes the helm of the ICCC and leads a movement with churches in 29 countries, he is adamant about avoiding the mistakes made in the Paulk scandal. We must, he says, do three things immediately:

1. Develop a mechanism to evaluate charges against church leaders. Typically, Huskins says, “credibility is always given to the leader, while the accuser is always vilified.” Huskins believes that independent charismatic churches, in particular, have shied away from any form of church court “because we were afraid of becoming legalistic or denominational.” We must develop a system of accountability that neither demonizes the accuser nor makes the leader out to be the target of a witch-hunt.

2. Rethink the issue of submission to authority. In many churches today, Huskins says, the leader of a church is given pre-eminence at the expense of Christ’s own authority—and this becomes unhealthy religious control. “The pulpit must serve the pew. But in some churches the pew is expected to serve the pulpit,” he says. “What we need is a return to servant leadership.”

3. Demand accountability. In the past, church leaders demanded that their parishioners be faithful in tithing, church attendance and moral integrity. But in today’s atmosphere of scandal and distrust, we shouldn’t be surprised when the tables are turned. Church members must be able to ask their leaders: “Who are you accountable to?”

If any of these steps had been implemented in Atlanta, fewer people would have been hurt—and one of the nation’s most prominent charismatic ministries might have been salvaged.

Let’s do it right next time.


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Billy Evans

 2006/2/2 16:41Profile
Compton
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Joined: 2005/2/24
Posts: 2732


 Re:

Quote:
Huskins believes that independent charismatic churches, in particular, have shied away from any form of church court “because we were afraid of becoming legalistic or denominational.”



Perhaps that statement was less then candid about the other reason large independant churches are afraid of transparency. In many cases these organizations allow their business to overtake their mission...the pastor is not only the shepherd, but he is also the owner and CEO who only negotiates with strategic partners (other consenting ministries) and begins to regard public accountability as an intrusion into his privately held corporation.

Quote:
“It is time for new leadership,” Haskins said.



I think his watch is running slow.

MC


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Mike Compton

 2006/2/2 19:00Profile
Graftedbranc
Member



Joined: 2005/11/8
Posts: 619


 Re:

On the one hand, It is not good for the writer of these two articals to presume this one is guilty based on some accusations. But this article assumes that these things are true and calls for a public apology.

I believe a call for one's such as this to publicly apologize and "make right" is... well, not even in the ball park.

If these things are so (And I don't say they are but look that way) what we have here is years of systematic deception, fleecing of the flock, and deliberate lying, cover up and charlitanism.

Here is a man who wraps a religious collar around his neck, call's himself a "self appointed bishop" and uses religious authority to fulfill his lusts.

This is not a matter of a Servant of God who has fallen and succumbed to temptation. This is a matter of a false teacher who systematically and deliberately decieves for the purpose of sordid gain and his lusts. Who views the church as a platform for service to himself, and who uses religion for his own currupt ends. This is a person who is behaving like no less than Satan himself.

What this man needs is not to apologize, He needs to repent toward God and be saved.

Sorry for such a harsh word. But a "call to apology" as in the articals is, well, I don't even have a word for it. IT is in the relm of the flesh.

To call for an apology is not appropriate. Paul would say, "the Lord reward him according to his deeds".

"It's time for new Leadership". I say it is time to seek the Lord as to the releigion you are involved in which can permit and tolorate such things for so many years, justify it, cover it up and such. What is this anyway? It has nothing to do with biblical Christianity. There is nothing of Christ and nothing of the Spirit I don't care what kind of gifts or Charasmatic things go on. It is not Christianity.

Graftedbranch

 2006/2/2 21:45Profile









 Re:

Quote:
I think his watch is running slow.

Amen. Your wit redeems an horrific report, in the right direction.

Quote:
This is not a matter of a Servant of God who has fallen and succumbed to temptation. This is a matter of a false teacher who systematically and deliberately decieves for the purpose of sordid gain and his lusts. Who views the church as a platform for service to himself, and who uses religion for his own currupt ends. This is a person who is behaving like no less than Satan himself.

GB,

Notwithstanding your important preamble which I have not quoted, it is a pleasure to agree with you 100% on this point.

 2006/2/3 0:06





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