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"Pilgrim and Sojourner." - 1 Peter 2:11

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 2 signs of revival


"uncommon unity and unusual prayer." -winkie pratney

I was thinking on this statement by brother Pratney and its very true. These 2 commonalities happen when God comes in revival to the church. I have been more and more believing that what God is doing at sermonindex is promoting prayer and doing this cross-denominational therefore a sense of unity. May God continue to work the signs of revival amongst us and in our churches in this new year.


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SI Moderator - Greg Gordon

 2005/12/31 22:02Profile
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 Re: 2 signs of revival

Amen, I would add that unusual and frequent prayer leads to unity.


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David Michael Paul

 2006/1/2 2:46Profile
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Joined: 2005/10/8
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 Re:

The great divisions that occurred right before the Great Awakening encourage me to seek revival even when things seem to be going wrong.

Prayer is the one aspect of Christian obedience that God has really been impressing and instructing me on.
I am beginning to shorten my public prayers, saying on that which I feel is being prayed in the Spirit, and increasing my secret prayers.

May God bring revival, and by that I mean bring Himself!

-Chris


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Christopher Wright

 2006/1/2 10:26Profile
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 Re: 2 signs of revival

What would "unusual prayer" consist of?


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Melissa

 2006/1/31 17:14Profile
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 Signs of Revival

I heard a preacher say one time that you know a church is not having revival when the people show up late and leave early, but you know a church is having revival when the people show up early and stay late.

I think Brother Ravenhill would agree with me when I say I judge the spirituality of a church not by how many people come to the Sunday morning service but by how many people will bother to show up for a 5am prayer meeting on Monday morning.

Nothing causes us to love another person like praying for them can. I believe that's why prayer is the key to revival.


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Troy

 2006/1/31 18:04Profile
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"Pilgrim and Sojourner." - 1 Peter 2:11

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 Re: Signs of Revival

Quote:
What would "unusual prayer" consist of?


I would say that this "unusual prayer" would consist of extending times of prayer, praying with an urgency and burden that is not normal. Many call this the "spirit of prayer" and "prevailing prayer" terms that are quite often forgotten in our modern day christianity.


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SI Moderator - Greg Gordon

 2006/1/31 18:17Profile
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 Re:

Wow. Thanks. :-) I'm going to chew on that for a while!


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Melissa

 2006/1/31 23:06Profile
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 Re:

Quote:

"uncommon unity and unusual prayer." -winkie pratney



I remember J. Edwin Orr talking about the 1858 revival in America as the only time when the denominations acted as 'one man'. The cooperation among denominations at that time was one huge contributing factor of the 'Great Century' of worldwide missions. It seems the more the Holy Spirit is welcome and manifesting in the midst of God's people, He brings about the large-heartedness of Jesus Christ to the individual members of His body.


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Ken Marino

 2006/1/31 23:37Profile
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 Re:

Quote:
"uncommon unity and unusual prayer."



Brethren, this really touches an ongoing chord in my own thoughts on our collective futures.

Unity is much talked about but I sometimes feel unity is the riddle where we know the answer but we can't agree on the question.

Recently I watched a documentary on Christian art in Europe, South America and Asia during the last two centuries. When I see the incredible diversity of Christian expression across a myriad of cultures, persecutions, and centuries I can't help but conclude our current divisiveness in this country is little more then comfortable indulgence. Like the rest of the modern world, we feel compelled to become micro-specialists.

Yet viewed from another century we western Pentecostals, Baptists, Charismatics, Methodists, are far more alike then we realize. If viewed by 6th century Roman Christians, 10th century Ethiopian Christians, 15th century South American Christians or 18th century Japanese Christians, I think it's fair to say that 21st century American (and perhaps Western European Christians?) would seem almost cut from the same modern mold.

I'm not suggesting we don't have differences…even meaningful issues to discuss. I'm not saying that we should throw away our personal convictions, or that anything that has a cross on it is "christian." I'm wondering aloud if it's possible to regard each other without the intensity and scrutiny we assume is normal. Maybe it's not, for our scrutiny and criticismm is closely related to our commitment to excellence.

Yet most diamonds may be considered excellent untill when viewed up close, studied through a microscope, they will seem coarse and alien. Then appreciated with the natural eye it can seem radiant and glorious like a little morning star. Our high education may inform us that this diamond is flawed and deformed, but we enjoy them anyways. Faith in Christ is a precious gem, though it is cut in different shapes.

This is perhaps the most valuable lesson I have learned from the year or so since I have been visiting the Forum at SI.

Now, I'm sure we have all thought along these lines before and shrug our shoulders. So in the end, what may be required is such a radical societal shift that we are forced to leave our various private schools of Christianity, and find shelter in one another just for bodily warmth. I don't pretend to know what that situation would look like or if we will see it ourselves...only that I believe it will have to be drastic enough in scale if we are to be distracted from each others flaws.

Indeed, the weakest among us who we now deride as unfit for the kingdom of God, may become the very object of our persistent prayer, compassion, and labor, so that when the Son of Man comes, he may find faith on Earth.

MC


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Mike Compton

 2006/2/1 4:25Profile
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 Re:

Quote:
Indeed, the weakest among us who we now deride as unfit for the kingdom of God, may become the very object of our persistent prayer, compassion, and labor, so that when the Son of Man comes, he may find faith on Earth.



That reminded me of a passage in Zechariah: 'In that day the LORD will defend the inhabitants of Jerusalem; the one who is feeble among them in that day shall be like David, and the house of David shall be like God, like the Angel of the LORD before them.'

Now don't get me started :-) I have been putting a lot of thoughts down about revival, and what you touched upon is real important. Rather than go into the context from which I lifted this out of, I'll just quote it:

One reason why revival is not a passion among God’s people is that we are not as large-hearted toward our brothers and sisters in the Body of Christ as Jesus is. We tend to follow sectarian lines and pray only for our particular brand of believers or denomination. From the times of the Reformation, theologians have butted heads over election and predestination and persecuted to the death Christians who disagreed with their doctrinal stance (such as the slaughter carried out in the name of Christ against the Anabaptists). Jesus ever lives to intercede for His people, but His followers are not always as large-hearted in their intercessions for their brothers and sisters. Proper Bible-based doctrine is no doubt essential and important. I oppose the modernism of our day that takes a scissors approach to the Bible, sitting in the judge’s bench as to what is God’s Word and what is not. Nevertheless there are very few brothers and sisters in the Body of Christ today who measure up with every line item of belief and practice with every as we do. But if Jesus Christ has accepted them and lavishes His love and grace upon them, who are we to reject them?

The original disciples had the same narrow-heartedness. Look at John complaining to Jesus to stop the people who were casting out demons in His name because they weren’t following them. They would rather that people remain demon-possessed than having this other group doing miracles in Jesus’ name! Jesus rebuked that kind of thinking. Paul had to contend early on with denominationalism in the church of Corinth that was splitting over carnal preferences for preachers. By contrast, Paul’s love was expressed in prayer for even churches he did not start or even meet! For example, the church of Colosse was founded by someone else, yet hearing of love and faith stirred his heart of love to intercede for them. Paul encouraged the saints in Ephesus to pray for ‘all the saints’ (Ephesians 6:18), not just some. The heart of Jesus is that His Church be one even as He is one (John 17:21). Certainly there is the man-made false unity of ecumenism and humanism, but that does not negate the true one which God has worked and is working in the Church of Jesus Christ today.

Sometimes leaders of great movement of God may be large-hearted, but their followers are more rigid and narrow-hearted. The followers of Wesley, who were strongly Arminian, once asked John Wesley about fellow evangelist George Whitfield, who was a strong Calvinist. Both men were mightily used to lead tens of thousands to Christ in their lifetime.

One day someone asked Wesley if he expected to see Whitfield in heaven. The evangelist replied, ‘No, I do not believe I will see Whitfield in heaven.’

‘Then do you not think Whitfield is a converted man?’

‘Of course he is a converted man!’ Wesley replied, ‘I do not expect to see him in heaven-because he will be so close to the throne of God, and I will be so far away that I will not be able to see him!’

An early quotation regarding proper attitude towards other believers can be seen in this: ‘In all things necessary, unity; in all things doubtful, liberty; in all things, charity [love].’ The context in which this statement is used determines its correctness. Just as a knife can be used for preparing food or for murder, the motive in which these instruments are used makes it good or evil. Who defines the ‘all things necessary’? We can see these defined by the early church fathers in the various creeds developed. So we get basic tenets of faith expressed in ones such as the Apostles’ Creed: ‘I believe in God the Father, Almighty, Maker of heaven and earth…’

We need not reinvent the wheel and come up with a new set of creeds for the essential Christian faith. All I’m trying to briefly point out is that we need to guard against is the Adamic tendency of pride in glorying in men and organizations (the one which we belong to, of course) but are unmoved with heartfelt intercession for other members of Christ’s Body, who perhaps are misguided, not as enlightened on scriptural truth and practice, or weaker than ourselves. If we are strong, we should bear the infirmities of the weak (Romans 15:1). Paul was a firm believer that God would right the wrongs of fellowships, and his energetic night and day prayer life for the people of God exemplified his belief. Have you ever held up your prayer life against this great apostle’s to see how it holds up? I have done it, and it has humbled me to the dust. But out the dust has arisen great life and expectation to be more like the Jesus I see in this great man.

The difference between Jesus’ holiness and my own practical day-to-day holiness is immensely vast (infinite, perhaps?) than my personal holiness in comparison with any other brother. Yet Jesus does not cease to pray for me. Shouldn’t we have the same mind that is in Christ, especially the more we claim to be filled with His Spirit and nature? The late Richard Wurmbrand, who founded Voice of the Martyrs and suffered fourteen years in a Romanian torture camp, made an insightful comment. The Communists didn’t make the same denominational distinctions that Christians often do. They didn’t give the Baptists to their own cell and Orthodox Christians somewhere else; they were all thrown together and beaten together for their one common faith in Jesus Christ. He noted that under such dire circumstances, much of the formality of icons and religious rituals (such as held by Orthodox faith) disappeared and these people became lovers of the Lord Jesus Christ, purified through affliction. Someday we are all going to be gathered around the throne from every kindred and tongue and tribe and nation. There will be no denominations then. Must we wait until we get to heaven, or may we begin in some measure practice the Spirit of Christ now in our prayer life?


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Ken Marino

 2006/2/1 8:50Profile





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