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Discussion Forum : News and Current Events : Churches using 'Chronicles of Narnia' as preaching tool

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dohzman
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Joined: 2004/10/13
Posts: 2132


 Re:

Quote:
I can see what you guys are talking about. But if you want to here something really encouraging about those who pass out tracts and use a simple witness check this story out...



That was awesome, may I download it and pass out copies to my colleagues?


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D.Miller

 2005/10/25 18:36Profile
Forevidence
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Joined: 2004/7/29
Posts: 711
Riverside

 Re:

Quote:
That was awesome, may I download it and pass out copies to my colleagues?




Yeah you can go ahead and copy the download and pass it out to whoever you want!


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Giancarlo

 2005/10/26 12:04Profile
roadsign
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Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 Re:

Quote:
something really encouraging about those who pass out tracts


Surely it is God who is to be praised. This little man with the white hair did his "ministry" quietly, between him and God, and God used that broken vessel to pour out his Spirit.
As was pointed out, it was his heart's love for God that God used more than his method.
Diane


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Diane

 2005/10/26 13:10Profile
Forevidence
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Joined: 2004/7/29
Posts: 711
Riverside

 Re:

Quote:
Surely it is God who is to be praised. This little man with the white hair did his "ministry" quietly, between him and God, and God used that broken vessel to pour out his Spirit.



The man still past out tracts... The point i'm trying to make is that it was a simple witness with simple tools and it was effective.


Obviously you don't believe that tracts can be used. I will disagree with you on this particular issue since I know a couple of people who have been saved by tracts.

But beyond that, I want to also want to share something else that Living Waters will be given out with the tract. It will be an sudio message on CD that has Ray Comfort preaching the gospel using Chronicles of Narnia allegory.

Peep it, click the link...




I would encourage everyone to seize this opportunity and download this mp3 and burn it to convert to a wave file, burn them and pass them out to people when the movie comes out.

You can also Check this site out...

[url=http://www.narniastory.com/index.shtml]Chronicles of Narnia[/url]


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Giancarlo

 2005/10/26 14:25Profile
ccchhhrrriiisss
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Joined: 2003/11/23
Posts: 4489


 Re: Churches using 'Chronicles of Narnia' as preaching tool

Hello...!

It appears that there are some strong misconceptions about [i]The Chronicles of Narnia[/i] that have circulated throughout modern-day Christianity.

As a child and a teen, I read each of the books several times. They are definitely well written works of "[i]fantasy-fiction[/i]". While there are some occassional Biblical references (i.e. "sons of Adam" and "daughters of Eve" etc...), and the occassional Christian symbolism that was present (like Aslan's death as a symbol of Christ's sacrifice, etc...), the extent of such presumed allegory is debatable. There is a strong distiction that can be made between something that is an [i]allegory, allegorical[/i] or [i]symbolic[/i].

So do these books represent an allegory?

It is definitely [u]not[/u] an allegory in the [i]Pilgrim's Progess[/i] example of an allegory. Like Tolkien stated about his [i]Lord of the Rings[/i] books, C. S. Lewis refuted the idea that his books were an allegory. He wrote, "[i]Some people seem to think that I began by asking myself how I could say something about Christianity to children; then fixed on the fairy tale as an instrument, then collected information about child psychology and decided what age group I'd write for; then drew up a list of basic Christian truths and hammered out 'allegories' to embody them. This is all pure moonshine. I couldn't write in that way. It all began with images; a faun carrying an umbrella, a queen on a sledge, a magnificent lion. At first there wasn't anything Christian about them; that element pushed itself in of its own accord[/i]" (from [i][u]Of Other Worlds[/u][/i]).

C. S. Lewis stated that those who label the books as an allegory are reading more into the books than he desired. Lewis stated that the books were more an example of "alternate historical fiction." He wrote, "[i]If Aslan represented the immaterial Deity in the same way in which Giant Despair represents despair, he would be an allegorical figure. In reality however he is an invention giving an imaginary answer to the question, 'What might Christ become like, if there really were a world like Narnia and He chose to be incarnate and die and rise again in that world as He actually has done in ours?' This is not allegory at all[/i]."

Thus, the argument that the books are an allegory is fundamentally flawed. However, the books are certainly allegorical in that they symbolize and make reference to certain aspects of Christianity. However, further speculation about possible Christian allegorical references is cloudy at best. One could argue that there is allegory present in many works of fiction -- including some blatantly sinful works, like the [i]Harry Potter[/i] books. Indeed, to those that have read books from both series, there is nearly as much magic mentioned in [i]The Chronicles of Narnia[/i] as in [i]Harry Potter[/i].

Some people try to attribute Christian themes to secular fiction. It is typical with films like [i]Star Wars[/i], which probably borrowed more from eastern religion than Christianity. During high school, a literature teacher assigned Hemingway's book, [i]The Old Man and the Sea[/i]. She sincerely believed the book was a Christian allegory. I read the book several times, but I could never find any allegorical references, let alone Christian symbolism. My college English professors laughed at the notion that the book represented a Christian allegory. Given Hemingway's questionable lifestyle and subsequent suicide, one might argue that the book was a [u]non-Christian[/u] allegory. But it seems that Christians are often absorbed with the notion that Christianity affects the arts more than we realize.

I tell people that are looking for Christian symbolism within secular sources that all one has to do is look up. For "the heavens declare the glory of God; and the firmament showeth his handywork" (Psalm 19:1). But attibuting books about witchcraft and magic to Christian belief can be quite harmful to young believers. Instead, let's point them to a "sure" word -- God's Word!

:-)


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Christopher

 2005/10/26 18:24Profile
KingJimmy
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Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
Charlotte, NC

 Re:

Excellent post Chris. It reminds me of Chip Brogden believing that the Matrix was something of profound prophetic significance. There is a sad desparation out there to make these things Christian.

To me, it is quite embarrasing, especially when it is known that the authors had other motives. Such as Star Wars has no gospel in it, though some would swear it does. If they looked into it though, they would find out George Lucas attempted to create a modern day myth/story, as he was a big fan of Jungian philosophy/psychology, and the works of folks like Joseph Campbell, and based his work off these.


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Jimmy H

 2005/10/26 19:04Profile
roadsign
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Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 redeemer concept

Is it possible that the redeemer/slain/resurrected hero concept as portrayed by Aslan might help someone become aware of the possibility, and thus help pave the way in their thinking for the Christ-redeemer?
Diane


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Diane

 2005/10/26 20:52Profile
dohzman
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Joined: 2004/10/13
Posts: 2132


 Re:

I understand what everyones saying, however I want to note a few things. When star wars first came out the whole church was decidedly against it because of its stand for middle eastern philosphy and pratices, "the force luke, use the force" :-( The potter seris is decidely demonic and directly promotes witch craft and not fanatasy. The church agreed on that when it first came out, like star wars its only recieved acceptance in the last 2 years.

CS Lewis. I know that some don't like him and maybe some of his writtings are flawed. However he did much to promote the cause of Christ in his day. As for his writtings? There's an old saying that comes to mind, "you can take the boy out of the country but you can't take the country out of the boy" , losely translated, Lewis' christian teaching came through all his writting and has stood the test of time. It has been used for the purposes of telling children about Jesus, heaven, the evil one etc... for years.Time tested and proven.

It strikes me as sad when the church can't even agree on something that one of its own has written and accept it, or at least use it as an aid. Agree with it or not, come December we will be faced with an oppurtunity to use it to open up dialogue with people who wouldn't normally speak with us about spiritual things. Go at them with a critical words about that work and thier blood will be on your hands, because before you get a chance to witness they will have stopped listening.
The oppurtunity vs. the choice that we will make , but know this that souls, precious souls , which God will place in each persons hands, weighs in the balance. Sometimes we just need to put away our personal prejudices.


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D.Miller

 2005/10/26 21:11Profile
PaulWiglaf
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Joined: 2005/8/31
Posts: 61
Hartselle, Alabama

 Re: redeemer concept

Roadsign:

Yes, many a person has asked this. A mother of a nine-year-old boy named Laurence wrote C.S. Lewis in fear that her son was falling more in love with Aslan than Christ. Lewis responds:

Quote:
Laurence can't really love Aslan more than Jesus, even if he feels that's what he is doing. For the things he loves Aslan for doing and for saying are simply the things Jesus really did and said. So that when Laurence thinks he is loving Aslan, he is really loving Jesus: and perhaps loving Him more than he ever did before.



Even better, in the [i]Dawn Treader[/i], Aslan explains out his purpose in response to Lucy's fear of never seeing him again:

Quote:
"But you shall meet me, dear one," he reassured. "But there I have another name. You must learn to know me by that name. This was the very reason why you were brought to Narnia, that by knowing me here for a little, you may know me better there."



Upon being questioned by an anxious little girl as to this "other name", Lewis writes:

Quote:
As to Aslan's other name, well I want you to guess. Has there never been anyone in this world who (1.) Arrived at the same time as Father Christmas. (2.) Said he was the son of the Great Emperor. (3.) Gave himself up for somone else's fault to be jeered at and killed by wicked people. (4.) Came to life again...Don't you really know His name in this world.



So, Lewis was pleased that his works were bringing about the questions that draw focus to Christ.

Perhaps, we should look to his own conversion to understand this phenominon that he said "crossed the great frontier" towards the quest for joy. For, He was awakened to his own search for joy by the writings of a 19th Century preacher named George MacDonald--his fantasies, not his sermons.

Therefore, let us not "throw the baby out with the dish water" by casting off his works for the magic in them. For, I must give the question, though I am by no means a supporter of magic or the occult: What could he have substituted for magic? "Force" would lead to cries of "Pantheist". "Power" would still ring in the ears as "magic". Indeed, we have to struggle with diction on the matter that the english language offers us no real decent correlation to the word "miracle" (as Lewis, being an english teach at the Magdalan College in Oxford, would know).

Personally, I was excited to see his works make it to the main screen. Perhaps, again we will hear of little girls asking, "What is Aslan's other name?",giving an open opportunity to present Christ to the world. :-)

Blessings,
Benjamin

PS: A good book to read is [i]Finding God in the Land of Narnia[/i] by Kurt Bruner and Jim Ware.

 2005/10/26 23:12Profile
roadsign
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Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 Re: First we need the RIGHT QUESTIONS

Quote:
It strikes me as sad when the church can't even agree on something that one of its own has written and accept it, or at least use it as an aid.


Perhaps fear is the reason. When we have become accustomed to certain "correct" phrases, then anything outside the box is suspect.

One "evangelical" organization rejected my testimony because it "doesn't clearly give the way of salvation" I admit that it doesn't have the familiar phrases that are expected, but it was MY journey to true salvation - to finding Christ.

We want to give the answers before the questions are raised. Perhaps it would be better to learn how to stimulate people to ask the right questions. We'd have a lot fewer passive "Christians" - those who have become conditioned to just eat predigested, spoonfed "answers". Really they are merely borrowing someone else's faith, and have never grown up - ie learned to think and ask.

CS Lewis could get people thinking.
Diane


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Diane

 2005/10/27 7:06Profile





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