SermonIndex Audio Sermons
Image Map
Discussion Forum : Scriptures and Doctrine : Questions of life and breath and Spirit

Print Thread (PDF)

Goto page ( 1 | 2 | 3 Next Page )
PosterThread









 Questions of life and breath and Spirit

The thread in the Lounge on 'Abortion' has sparked these questions, because of the liberal use of the word 'murder', there.

What is the significance of 'breath' for humans?

What is the place of 'breath' in a scriptural definition of 'life'?

Or, is it possible to be 'alive' without 'breath' and if so, how is this justified from scripture?

Should your definitions line up with the parallel of being born of the Spirit (John 3)?

Jeremiah 1:5
Before I formed thee in the belly I knew thee; and before thou camest forth out of the womb I sanctified thee, [and] I ordained thee a prophet unto the nations.

All of us recognise that before we were born again, God was preparing us to receive His Spirit. After we received His Spirit, we became aware of eternity and the I AM, and understood that in the Father's heart, we had always existed. So, if we had not been born again, would we not exist in fact (spiritually alive), like we do now through Him who loved us and gave His life for us?

 2005/7/6 15:02
My_Daughter
Member



Joined: 2005/7/6
Posts: 20


 Re: Questions of life and breath and Spirit

please no offense.

This is so good..

Or, is it possible to be 'alive' without 'breath' and if so, how is this justified from scripture?

I will study tonight, and come back if I may and answer this from scripture. (by the way I have a Scofield/NKjV)bible. I may at times make some errors but the Holy Spirit always takes me to crosswalk/lexington and teaches me. I find that it is alittle difficult not to have anyone to talk to and to ask, so I will ask you if that's ok.

Everyone is so anoited on this site, and I feel left behind and must catch up.

Beware I drive a sports car, amen.

God Bless You, I will return with some answers
from scripute.

 2005/7/6 15:52Profile
My_Daughter
Member



Joined: 2005/7/6
Posts: 20


 Re: Questions of life and breath and Spirit

Dorcas in response...

My interpretion as follows;

Oxygen_02
His Word
(John 3) flesh gives birth to flesh/Spirit to Spirit

Last Question:
~ No we would not if we were not born again: However, we would still be in his heart, but we would not have access to his kingdom (Give me the Kingdom). The Kingdom suffers violence and the vialent taketh by force.

In Conclusion: John 7-8 You must not be surpised at my saying. You must be born again -- The wind blos wherever it please. You hdar it's sound, but you cannot tell where it comes from or where it is going. So it is with everyone born of the spirit.

~Second to last question;
Or is it possible to be "alive" without "breath" and if so, how is this justified from scripture?, NO!, with justifications as follows;

A1 Gen 2:7 -- The lord God formed the man/adam from the dust of the ground and breathed into his nostrils the BREATH OF LIFE and the man became a living being.

A2 Eze 47:5 (37) -- This is what the Soverign Lord says to these bones. I will make Breath enter you, and you will come to life. I will attach tendons to you and make flesh come upon you and cover you with skin. I will put Breath in you, and you will come to life, Then you will know that I am the Lord.

A3 Rev 11:11 -- But after the three and a half days a BREATH OF LIFE from God entered them, and they stood on their feet, and terror struck those who saw them.


My Song
Early in the morning will I seek your face
in prayer and in worship.

And early in the morning will I draw from your well, the well of living waters.

Breath in me Oh Heavens well the BREATH OF LIFE, for I shall live and not die.

Day after Day will I praise your Holy Name,

And Day after Day will I lift up my hands as an evening sacrifice.

Breath in me Oh, Heavens well the BREATH OF LIFE, for I shall live and not die.

Precept upon Precept and Line upon Line
shall your BREATH OF LIFE instruct me and
illuminate my path.

Breath in me, Breath in me, Breath in me
Oh Heavens well, the BREATH OF LIFE, for
I shall live and not die, Yes, I shall live
and not die.

Thanks Dorcas -- was waiting on the Lord to post.

 2005/7/12 12:10Profile
dohzman
Member



Joined: 2004/10/13
Posts: 2132


 Re:

And breathed into his nostrils the breath of life; which in that way entered into his body, and quickened it, which before was a lifeless lump of clay, though beautifully shapen: it is in the plural number, the "breath of lives" (l), including the vegetative, sensitive, and rational life of man. And this was produced not with his body, as the souls of brutes were, and was produced by the breath of God, as theirs were not; nor theirs out of the earth, as his body was: and these two different productions show the different nature of the soul and body of man, the one is material and mortal, the other immaterial and immortal: GILLS COMMENTARY ON GEN 2:7


_________________
D.Miller

 2005/7/12 16:54Profile
philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re: Traducianism, creationism and infusionism - you asked for it!

it seems this subject is either unwanted or dangerous ground. I suspect it is the latter. In the other thread on this topic I tried to identify what constitutes 'personhood'. I plumbed for genetic uniqueness and according to that criteria the fertilised ovum is a person. We are now moving onto the question of 'life' and its association with breath. On this basis some have concluded that an individual does not exist as a separate 'soul' until it takes its first breath.

Physical death clearly separates soul from body, but when does soul 'arrive' in the body. We are moving into territory which has been fought over in the past; this is the battlezone of creationism (not the young earth variety) and traducianism.In Christian theology, traducianism is a doctrine about the origin of the soul, in one of the biblical uses of word to mean the immaterial aspect of man (Genesis 35:18, Matthew 10:28). Traducianism means that this immaterial aspect is transmitted through natural generation along with the body, the material aspect of man. I.e. an individual's soul is derived from the souls of the individual's parents. This implies that only the souls of Adam and Eve were created directly by God, in contrast with creationism, which holds that all souls were so created.

Traducianism was supported by Tertullian, the Eastern Orthodox Church, Gregory of Nyssa, many in the early Western church (but Roman Catholicism is creationist), the Lutheran Church, and some theologians such as Baptist Augustus H. Strong and theologian William G.T. Shedd. Most theologians, especially the reformed, are creationists.
There is another view known as Infusionism
n. 1.
The doctrine that the soul is preexistent to the body, and is infused into it at conception or birth; - opposed to traducianism and creationism.

Do you want to have a quick look at the Wikipedia article before we get deeper into this?


_________________
Ron Bailey

 2005/7/14 14:16Profile
RobertW
Member



Joined: 2004/2/12
Posts: 4636
Independence, Missouri

 Re:

Looks like a good opportunity to try and understand just what the soul is. I would like to begin my thoughts by first stripping away the material aspect of man. In other words try and discover what is left when man has laid aside , 'this', his tabernacle (the body).

Before we decide what is a soul and whether man is a 'bi' (soul and body) or tri-part (spirit/soul/body) being- lets at least build up some info on what we know.

Lets look at man "stripped" of the 'outward man'.

[i]n Hades, he lifted up his eyes, being in torment, and saw Abraham far off, and Lazarus at his bosom. And he cried and said, Father Abraham, have mercy on me, and send Lazarus, that he may dip the tip of his finger in water, and cool my tongue; for I am tormented in this flame. But Abraham said, Son, remember that thou in thy lifetime receivedst thy good things, and likewise Lazarus evil things: but now he is comforted, and thou art tormented. And beside all this, between us and you there is a great gulf fixed: so that they which would pass from hence to you cannot; neither can they pass to us, that would come from thence[/i]

Based upon the story of the rich man and Lazarus we know that man does not need a body to:

1) He lifted up his eyes. This tells me he had conscious perception without having any phsical components normally assosciated with these actions. I.e. he 'saw' with no eyes and 'heard' with no ears.

2) Though he had no brain he retained his memory and recognized Lazarus (whom he had seen) and Abraham (whom he had not seen). I deduce from this that man's brain is in no wise the location of the information required for man to have 'memory'.

3) He "cried with a loud voice". This is some type of 'audible' communication. Yet not a voice that could be heard in the natural as there are no vocal chords with which to form the necessary sound waves. The voice was still recognizable as being the rich man's. The identity of the speaker is not lost when man is stripped of his physical characteristics.

4) He was tormented by a 'flame'. He is said to have a 'tongue' and Lazarus a 'finger'. We know this could not be a material 'tongue' or 'finger'. This leaves either the option of an entire metaphorical story (which I cannot wholly accept) or there is a real sense in which the soul has parallel characteristics to the physical body. This would mean that the unseen portion of man would have to have some sort of 'extension' into the unseen world and can experience phenomena.

5) All individuals involved in this scenerio were able to communicate and 'reason' without a physical brain.

This brings us to Matthew 10:28

[i]And fear not them which kill the body, but are not able to [u]kill the soul[/u]: but rather fear him which is able to destroy both [u]soul[/u] and body in hell.[/i]

For the purpose of understanding what it means when we say a persons "soul may go to hell" we are referring to the term 'soul' as our Lord uses it in this passage. This same word interestingly enough is used in the Revelation to describe [u]souls[/u] under the altar (6:9), creatures in the sea that had [u]life[/u], and in Revelation 18 describes them as being traded almost as a commodity (and we are not referring to 'slaves' here as slaves is the preceeding word to "souls of men").

I'll stop for comments...



_________________
Robert Wurtz II

 2005/7/15 13:33Profile









 Re: Questions of life and breath and Spirit

Thanks for the direction towards reading up on traducianism. I checked out the article in Wikipedia and also, the puritansmind link from google, the latter covering many points I've thought of myself.

Quote:
In the other thread on this topic I tried to identify what constitutes 'personhood'. I plumbed for genetic uniqueness and according to that criteria the fertilised ovum is a person.

philologos,

The fertilised ovum also develops a significant number of other roles, such as the placenta (which becomes the afterbirth), the bag of waters in which the fetus (later, the baby) floats, the water itself is produced by those cells and, the umbilical cord, which still contains primitive cells at the end of the process. As with the baby, these functions evolve to keep pace with growth, finally accounting for a significant part of what is borne forth. Everything except the baby is thrown away after it is delivered.

These are reasons I would associate the soul with the baby only.

Quote:
This leaves either the option of an entire metaphorical story (which I cannot wholly accept) or [b]there is a real sense in which the soul has parallel characteristics to the physical body[/b].

I think so, also, Robert.

 2005/7/16 21:59
philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re:

Dorcas writes

Quote:
These are reasons I would associate the soul with the baby only

OK, I take your point. When do you see the fertilized ovum as 'the baby'?


_________________
Ron Bailey

 2005/7/17 4:13Profile
RobertW
Member



Joined: 2004/2/12
Posts: 4636
Independence, Missouri

 Re:

In attempting to discover what the soul 'is' we can conclude that the soul can function completely independent of the body- just not in the material universe. The unseen aspect of man contains parallel capabilities to the body. We also know that disembodied souls can communicate with other disembodied souls. We see in the story of Abraham's bosom that there is a "great gulf affixed" not just between the heirs of the righteousness of God by faith and the non-heirs, but between the 'quick' and the 'dead'.

It is my understanding that the term 'death' in scripture denotes [i]seperation[/i] and not 'annhilation'. When the soul is seperated from the body this is physical death. When the soul is seperated from God this is spiritual death. When the soul is permanently seperated from God this is the 'second death.'

On with our inquiry- [b]"What 'is' the soul?"[/b]


If we say that the soul comes directly from God at birth we are left to make God the author of sin. We know God would not create something sinful. So it seems there has to have been a 'process' set into motion in the beginning that (like the body) would continue on in the creation of souls governed by some sort of laws similarly to those that govern natural reproduction.

A passage comes to mind to illustrate this:

"'Everyone who quotes proverbs will quote this proverb about you: "Like mother, like daughter." You are a true daughter of your mother, who [u]despised[/u] her husband and her children; and you are a true sister of your sisters, who [u]despised[/u] their husbands and their children. Your mother was a Hittite and your father an Amorite. (Ezekiel 16)

This is not physical characeristics, this is personality traits. It is as if we are reading "your personality" 'looks' like your Hittite mother and Amorite father. This is behavior. Notice God did not say, "You were raised like the heathen"- He made an allusion to biological parenting. Obviously we are dealing with personality traits somehow being 'passed on' to the daughter from the parents (specifically the mother). How many times have we heard it, "You act just like you dad." It is as though peoples personalities reflect their families as much as physical biological characteristics. We are in deep water at this point- and I'm not a good swimmer, but I cannot deny some sort of connection here.

Now we have to make all this jibe with the incarnation. In both cases we must conclude that whether it be 'body' or 'soul' [b]the Sin[/b] (original sin) cannot be transmitted through the mother. Yet we know that our Lord was preexistent. In this case we may loose some parallels between Christ and us. He was made [i]'like' unto His brethren[/i] and again... [i]a body thou hast prepared me[/i]. Notice that He did not say "a 'soul' thou hast prepared me." Yet Aaron was "... in the loins of his father...", not his mother when Melchezidek met Abram. This seems to indicate that the soul must somehow be derived from the fathers. They are "yet in the loins of their father..." In the case of THE Father- Mary was with child by the Holy Spirit. I don't take heed to generational curses and the like, but I recall the passage saying God would visit the iniquity of the fathers..., not the mothers. Yet in some sense the mother has a role to play in this also.

The mystery here is in the whole matter of cloning. Where does the 'soul' come from in that case? It seems to me that the whole process of reproduction must have laws set in motion by God that give an order to these things. You can change the 'inputs' (variables) but you cannot change the formula.

We will probably never know where the soul comes from. We can only say what we know [u]can't be possible[/u]. We know God does not create sinners. So any 'fresh' new soul from God would have to be sinless and pure like Adam. This leaves two options as I see it:

1) souls are born into this world sinless and the problem of sin is somehow contracted in the process of generation (like a mother passing a venerial disease to the child)

2) The whole process was set into motion when God created Adam and within his loins were the souls of people for all generations and in Adam all fell into Sin.

Any other options not associated with the accepted norms that others came up with?



_________________
Robert Wurtz II

 2005/7/18 10:44Profile
RobertW
Member



Joined: 2004/2/12
Posts: 4636
Independence, Missouri

 Re:

Looking again at what constitutes the immaterial portion of man it may be wise to make a few more suggestions to aid our studies:

1) We know that a physical body is not necessary for a person to have self-consciousness and a conscious awareness of their immediate environment.

2) We know that a physical body [u]is[/u] necessary for a person to experience phenomena in the material world.

3) We know that a material body is not necessary to experience consciousness in the unseen world.

4) The Hebrew word [b]nephesh[/b] is used in a variety of different ways leaving it difficult to establish any sort of pattern of understanding. It can mean 'life' or it can mean 'will'. It is translated as: any, appetite, body, creature, dead, desire, heart, himself, life, man, mind, person, soul, themselves, will, yourselves.

5) We know that the 'life' of the flesh is in the blood. This is a hard saying. It seems refer to the blood as being vital to the vitality and animation of the body by the soul.

6) We know that breathing through the lungs is not essential for 'animation.' This is proven scripturally when John leaped in the womb of his mother before he had first drawn a breath in this life. From this we must conclude- that though "breathing creature" is the literal translation of "living soul" the breath must only reside in the blood and can be transmitted through the blood from mother to child through the placenta. one need not breath through the lungs to be a live soul.

7) We know that whatsoever 'nepesh' is- animals are said to have it as well as human beings (See Genesis 1:20, 21, 24, 30, etc.).

8) It seems reasonable that if the voluntary thinking faculties of a person are resident in their soul- than likewise the involuntary controls of the body are likewise resident in this soul. This would explain why it is essential for a body to have a 'soul'. This would cast to the wind the commonly held belief that men use 'X' percent of their brain in their short lifetimes as it relegates this aspect of memory to the soul and not the material brain. In this view the brain is merely the interface between the soul and the body.

9) If theory 8 holds true then we can further theorize that the soul contains the protocol for the 'operations' of the body. If the soul determines to move the hand it seems reasonable that from the same 'location' would originate the commands for the vital organs, etc.

10) It is also interesting that there is a direct correlation between blood pressure and consciousness. When the blood pressure drops to a certain level- consciousness is lost.

11) If so be that there is a connection between the body and the unseen element of man that controls the functions of the material element; it seems reasonable that this line of communication can be interrupted. Moreover, if there is communication- there must be a "line of communication."

******************

We read in Genesis 2:7,

And Jehovah God formeth the man -- dust from the ground, and breatheth into his nostrils breath of life, and the man becometh a living creature (YLT)

Some translations say "living being." Are there any clues in this passage of man's creation that we can understand man's composition?


_________________
Robert Wurtz II

 2005/7/18 16:36Profile





©2002-2020 SermonIndex.net
Promoting Genuine Biblical Revival.
Affiliate Disclosure | Privacy Policy