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Discussion Forum : Revivals And Church History : Slavery and the Early Church

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 Re:


Well, it's a pleasure to know you, Sister. Made me smile because I've always enjoyed your contributions.

Many Blessings to you!

 2012/7/9 10:03









 Re:

Proudpapa, I've been reading through the website that you've posted and fighting tears the whole way through - going State to State. I don't have words for what was done - though I am quite aware of how the slaves got here and how they were used and abused - even our American Indians.
There just aren't words, Brother.

 2012/7/9 10:51
pilgrim777
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Joined: 2011/9/30
Posts: 1211


 Re:

Quote:
Massachusetts, like many American colonies, had roots in a scrupulous fundamentalist Protestantism. Christianity was no barrier to slave-ownership, however. The Puritans regarded themselves as God's Elect, and so they had no difficulty with slavery, which had the sanction of the Law of the God of Israel. The Calvinist doctrine of predestination easily supported the Puritans in a position that blacks were a people cursed and condemned by God to serve whites. Cotton Mather told blacks they were the "miserable children of Adam and Noah," for whom slavery had been ordained as a punishment



Is this still a prevailing belief amongst certain "Protestant" denominations? What theology influences the KKK and other White Supremacist groups?

By the way, thanks for the website, Slavery in the North. Very good resource.

Pilgrim

 2012/7/9 11:19Profile
proudpapa
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Joined: 2012/5/13
Posts: 2936


 Re: Pilgrim777

Pilgrim wrote /Is this still a prevailing belief amongst certain "Protestant" denominations? /

Yes. or atleast certain protestants,

Pilgrim wrote /What theology influences the KKK and other White Supremacist groups?/

Makes for an Interesting study









 2012/7/11 0:35Profile
EverestoSama
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Joined: 2010/5/17
Posts: 1175


 Re:

Quote:
Is this still a prevailing belief amongst certain "Protestant" denominations? What theology influences the KKK and other White Supremacist groups?



I know a pastor who was saved out of one of the cults involved in the KKK. He told me a greater majority of the KKK members as a whole subscribe to two theological leanings. One is something related to old Norse beliefs (probably Asatru), and the other was some sort of radical white-replacementist "christian" sect, to which he formerly belonged to.

This was over 10 years ago or so (I was probably only around 14 or 15 at the time) so I can't remember the name of the group specifically.

Before I truly gave my life to Christ I was heavily involved in extreme occult music circles, and one of the things that was prevalent in the black metal (name of a genre of heavy metal having nothing to do with skin color) scene particularly was an overt racism, related to heathenism and paganism. Even though I wasn't racist myself, the ones who I knew that were, held to a form of Asatru and Odenism. I would take a shot in the dark that many KKK adherents might belong to the same line of thinking, rather than hyper Calvinism. Though I could see it being either or.

 2012/7/11 0:55Profile









 Re:


I wondered, Everesto, if these were affiliated at all with the 'christian Identity' group? I know they're anti-Jew.

 2012/7/11 3:31
EverestoSama
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Joined: 2010/5/17
Posts: 1175


 Re:

You know what? Christian Identity just might have been the name of the group that the pastor told me about. It rang a bell as soon as I read it.

How anti-Jew is this group? The group I was told about was strongly and overtly anti-Jew from what I remember.

 2012/7/11 4:48Profile
BillT2030
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Joined: 2012/7/11
Posts: 2


 Re:

Christian Identity is in fact that "religion" of organizations like the KKK and other neo-nazi groups. Your pastor was correct also about the blending of the "norse" influences as well. That is exactly the "religion" that Hitler and the nazis of old held to. Groups like the KKK have taken that and tried to "Christianize" it.

Sorry to disappoint everyone, but the attempt to blame Calvinism for racist groups like the KKK and the neo-nazi's has no basis in reality. Christian Identity is not Calvinist and really has nothing to do with Calvinism. It has everything to do with Replacement Theology.

John Newton, the writer of the song Amazing Grace was a Calvinist and when God saved him he abandoned the slave trade to follow hard after God. He also was a close friend of William Wilberforce, another Calvinist, who fought hard to rid the UK of the slave trade.

To be sure there were preachers in the 1600's and 1700's who could have done more to preach against slavery, but be sure of one thing: many did! The blame can not soley be laid at the feet of Calvinists for throughout the South Methodism had taken hold in the form of tent meetings and revivals. Methodism certainly is not Calvinism, in fact it was at that time the opposite.

The Methodist Church at the time of the mid-1800's was split down the middle over the question of slavery. Obviously there were Northern Methodists and Southern Methodists, and the Southern Methodists supported slavery for the most part.

Not all Southern Methodist supported slavery, obviously. But the majority did.

There is plenty of blame to go around concerning Christians who supported slavery, not just Calvinists, but Armenians like the Methodists too. Also the Catholic Church as well.

I'm not supporting Calvinism by writing this. I'm simply saying that the bias against Calvinism is coming through on this topic. To lay the blame of slavery in America at the feet of Calvinism shows a lack of knowledge concerning basic American and Church history. We can twist history just as badly as we can twist the Bible when we let our agenda and hatred of certain things blind us.

As to those in the past who championed slavery (George Whitfield) we must realize that we in the 21st century have the benefit of hindsight and retrospect. It does not mean those men were correct, but at the same time we would be utterly arrogant to pretend to sit in judgement of them having not lived in that time or that society. It's easy 300 years later to look at Whitfield's push to legalize slavery in Georgia and call him a wretch for doing so. Were you alive then I think you would have a different thought process about it. Mind you, not what we believe would be a correct thought process, but a different one.

Those who criticize Whitfield's favor of slavery never ever mention his writings where he rejoiced at the salvation of slaves, and referred to them as a "brother in Christ", and that he also pushed for the evangelizing of slaves, as well as teaching them to read and write.

God is all powerful, and He even used an institution such as slavery to bring souls into the Kingdom of God. He did not approve of slavery anymore than He approved of Joseph's brothers selling him into slaver. But what the devil meant for evil, God meant it for good.

The problem here is that people in this dicussion, and others I have observed, give half of the truth and leave out the parts that do not suit their point. If Christians are to be known for their honesty then speak the entire truth. Yes, Whitfield and others were wrong about enslaving other human beings. They lived and breathed in the level of truth and revelation they had at that time. No, they were not desperately wicked for doing so. Whitfield cared about the condition of the soul of his slaves, and rejoiced when one became a "brother in Christ", as he referred to them.

 2012/7/11 6:53Profile
bakary
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Joined: 2010/10/6
Posts: 169
GAMBIA, WEST AFRICA

 Re:


Everresttosama: wrote:

"They also had this idea further championed by guys like George Whitfield, who twisted Scripture out of context to fit his desires, and campaigned for its legislation.
"
I cannot understand what you mean. The name george Whitefield is a very familiar name as a revivalist or something like that . Are you saying he supported slavery with all its injustice which even led to murder ? or are you talking about something else?


_________________
JAMES F JARJOU

 2012/7/11 6:54Profile
EverestoSama
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Joined: 2010/5/17
Posts: 1175


 Re:

Quote:
I cannot understand what you mean. The name george Whitefield is a very familiar name as a revivalist or something like that . Are you saying he supported slavery with all its injustice which even led to murder ? or are you talking about something else?



No, you got it right. THAT George Whitfield was the one campaigning for the legislation of it. He spoke against certain injustices regarding slavery, but that didn't stop him from buying, owning, and passing on slaves like property.

 2012/7/11 8:38Profile





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