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TaKa
Member



Joined: 2003/4/17
Posts: 124
Louisiana

 Power Through Prayer


Notes from Power Through Prayer by EM Bounds:

The principal cause of my leanness and unfruitfulness is owing to an unaccountable backwardness to pray. I can write or read or converse or hear with a ready heart; but prayer is more spiritual and inward than any of these, and the more spiritual any duty is the more my carnal heart is apt to start from it.

~Richard Newton


No ministry can be a spiritual one, securing holiness in the preacher and in his people, without prayer being made an evident and controlling force. The preacher that prays indeed puts God into the work. God does not come into the preacher's work as a matter of course or on general principles, but he comes by prayer and special urgency.

The great masters and teachers in Christian doctrine have always found in prayer their highest source of illumination. Not to go beyond the limits of the English Church, it is recorded of Bishop Andrews that he spent five hours daily on his knees. The greatest practical resolves that have enriched and beautified human life in Christian times have been arrived at in prayer.

~ Canon Liddon


Much time spent with God is the secret of all successful praying. God's acquaintance is not made by pop calls. God does not bestow his gifts on the casual or hasty comers and goers. Much with God alone is the secret of knowing him and of influence with him.

Christ, who in this as well as other things is our Example, spent many whole nights in prayer. His custom was to pray much. He had his habitual place to pray. Many long seasons of praying make up his history and character. Paul prayed day and night. It took time from very important interests for Daniel to pray three times a day.

Charles Simeon devoted the hours from four till eight in the morning to God. Mr. Wesley spent two hours daily in prayer. He began at four in the morning. Of him, one who knew him well wrote: "He thought prayer to be more his business than anything else, and I have seen him come out of his closet with a serenity of face next to shining."

John Fletcher stained the walls of his room by the breath of his prayers. Sometimes he would pray all night; always, frequently, and with great earnestness. His whole life was a life of prayer. "I would not rise from my seat," he said, "without lifting my heart to God." His greeting to a friend was always: "Do I meet you praying?"

Archbishop Leighton was so much alone with God that he seemed to be in a perpetual meditation. "Prayer and praise were his business and his pleasure," says his biographer. Bishop Ken was so much with God that his soul was said to be God-enamored. He was with God before the clock struck three every morning. Bishop Asbury said: "I propose to rise at four o'clock as often as I can and spend two hours in prayer and meditation."

Samuel Rutherford, the fragrance of whose piety is still rich, rose at three in the morning to meet God in prayer. Joseph Alleine arose at four o'clock for his business of praying till eight. If he heard other tradesmen plying their business before he was up, he would exclaim: "O how this shames me! Doth not my Master deserve more than theirs?"

One of the holiest and among the most gifted of Scotch preachers says: "I ought to spend the best hours in communion with God. It is my noblest and most fruitful employment, and is not to be thrust into a corner. The morning hours, from six to eight, are the most uninterrupted and should be thus employed. After tea is my best hour, and that should be solemnly dedicated to God.

I ought not to give up the good old habit of prayer before going to bed; but guard must be kept against sleep. When I awake in the night, I ought to rise and pray. A little time after breakfast might be given to intercession." This was the praying plan of Robert McCheyne. The memorable Methodist band in their praying shame us. "From four to five in the morning, private prayer; from five to six in the evening, private prayer."

John Welch, the holy and wonderful Scotch preacher, thought the day ill spent if he did not spend eight or ten hours in prayer. He kept a plaid that he might wrap himself when he arose to pray at night. His wife would complain when she found him lying on the ground weeping. He would reply: "O woman, I have the souls of three thousand to answer for, and I know not how it is with many of them!"

Bishop Andrewes spent the greatest part of five hours every day in prayer and devotion. Sir Henry Havelock always spent the first two hours of each day alone with God. If the encampment was struck at 6 A.M., he would rise at four.

Dr. Judson's success in prayer is attributable to the fact that he gave much time to prayer. He says on this point: "Arrange thy affairs, if possible, so that thou canst leisurely devote two or three hours every day not merely to devotional exercises but to the very act of secret prayer and communion with God. Endeavor seven times a day to withdraw from business and company and lift up thy soul to God in private retirement.

Begin the day by rising after midnight and devoting some time amid the silence and darkness of the night to this sacred work. Let the hour of opening dawn find thee at the same work. Let the hours of nine, twelve, three, six, and nine at night witness the same. Be resolute in his cause. Make all practicable sacrifices to maintain it. Consider that thy time is short, and that business and company must not be allowed to rob thee of thy God."

No man can do a great and enduring work for God who is not a man of prayer, and no man can be a man of prayer who does not give much time to praying.

Canon Liddon continues: "Let those who have really prayed give the answer. They sometimes describe prayer with the patriarch Jacob as a wrestling together with an Unseen Power which may last, not unfrequently in an earnest life, late into the night hours, or even to the break of day.

Sometimes they refer to common intercession with St. Paul as a concerted struggle. They have, when praying, their eyes fixed on the Great Intercessor in Gethsemane, upon the drops of blood which fall to the ground in that agony of resignation and sacrifice."


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Troy

 2003/8/26 8:41Profile
crsschk
Member



Joined: 2003/6/11
Posts: 9192
Santa Clara, CA

 Re: Power Through Prayer

Hi Taka,
Don't know how this one got lost in the shuffle.
Something I have noticed over the years in my reading of the intercessors of the past is how often 4:00 a.m. comes up, it seems to be a sacred hour.

Quote:
The principal cause of my leanness and unfruitfulness is owing to an unaccountable backwardness to pray. I can write or read or converse or hear with a ready heart; but prayer is more spiritual and inward than any of these, and the more spiritual any duty is the more my carnal heart is apt to start from it.

~Richard Newton


Interesting that this is where I seem to be right now in a sense. It usually is very easy to pray even if it is agonizing, lately it's as if I am to complacent, or I don't want to sit still long enough before I am up and reading...these were just what I needed to hear, time to dig in and fight.


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Mike Balog

 2003/9/9 22:06Profile
sermonindex
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Joined: 2002/12/11
Posts: 37309
"Pilgrim and Sojourner." - 1 Peter 2:11

Online!
 Re:

Quote:
Interesting that this is where I seem to be right now in a sense. It usually is very easy to pray even if it is agonizing, lately it's as if I am to complacent, or I don't want to sit still long enough before I am up and reading...these were just what I needed to hear, time to dig in and fight.


YES! its the saddest thing that when adversities and troubles leave and you are in a state of complacency too many times our prayer life struggles. There is no urgency or dire need and that makes us think we are fine and there is nothing to worry about. But the true of the matter is that we are in a huge spiritual battle 24/7 and we need to be 'aware of the devil's schemes' all the time.

Quote:
[b]Much with God alone[/b] is the secret of knowing him and of influence with him.


Not 'some with God alone' but '[b]Much[/b] with God alone'. I will be the first to admit that it seems like I am getting nowhere when I pray sometimes and usually I just give up after 5-10 mins of this state. But I want to encourage you brothers that if you persevere and set your mind up that you are going to be 'much with God alone' you will experience the wonderful intimacy of God's fellowship.

Quote:
these were just what I needed to hear, time to dig in and fight.


AMEN


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SI Moderator - Greg Gordon

 2003/9/10 10:55Profile





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