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KingJimmy
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Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
Charlotte, NC

 Art Katz's Eschatology

Brother Art Katz, whose sermons have been a tremendous source of blessing to many across the world, and have also been featured via this web site, espoused a rather "unique" perspective on the last days. His challenging and unconventional point of view that few hold too has no doubt been a source of controversy and confusion. His view point on these things have caused many to either love him or hate him. Sometimes his eschatological perspective has become a matter of discussion in the forums over the years. Many have expressed a desire to study his perspective in more detail, but have lacked the time necessary to work their way through the Scriptures, and wrestle with many of the texts he spoke on or made reference to.

Having been enriched by Art's perspective, and having done much of the homework myself over the years, I have decided to put together a collect of "proof texts" that I see as teaching many of the themes Art spoke on. This list is by no means exhaustive, nor are my comments on the quoted passages very detailed. However, these are some of the passages I believe to be essential in understanding these issues.

Most of my citations come from the Old Testament, not because Art didn't teach considerably on this topic from the New Testament, but simply because those texts he taught on in the New are generally easier to find because of the greater familiarity of many with the New Testament over the Old. I draw heavily from the writings of Isaiah.

Be blessed in the fruits of this labor. Study and show yourself approved :-)

###Key Eschatological Texts###

*Genesis 12:1-3
The Gospel; God’s eschatological purposes announced to Abraham through His covenant.

*Genesis 17:1-8
Promises reaffirmed and expanded.

*Deuteronomy 28-32
The blessings and curses of the Old Covenant announced; Song of Moses used to remind God’s rebellious people of their error.

*Isaiah 2:1-4
Jerusalem will be the center of the universe and source of universal blessing. The law will go forth from Zion.

*Isaiah 4:1-6
The Messianic Branch that will sprout, and the fire baptized remnant that will be purged and saved.

*Isaiah 11
Jesse’s Offspring & the Second Exodus.

*Isaiah 49 (especially 1-13, 22-26)
The Messianic Servant and His eschatological mission: Demonstrate the righteousness of God in the salvation of the Gentiles, and the salvation of the Jews.

*Isaiah 60-66
All of this section should be read together so that the “weight” of it sinks in. It is full of great detail regarding God’s ultimate dealings with Israel and the rest of the world. This is an absolutely crucial section of Scripture to digest and consider.

*Jeremiah 30-31
The time of Jacob’s trouble; God’s chastisement through exile; Restoration and Second Exodus, Grace in the wilderness; New Covenant established to cure Israel of its apostasies.

*Ezekiel 37
The Valley of Dry Bones, a picture of Israel’s eschatological death and resurrection. New Covenant announced.

*Daniel 2
The kingdom of God that is coming will be victorious.

*Daniel 9-11
A timeline of last day events, with many references to the coming anti-Christ.

*Daniel 12
Israel’s last days “distress” that empties them of their human strength and power; Resurrection foretold.

*Zechariah 12-14
God enters into His controversy with the nations by making Jerusalem a cup of reeling the causes all nations to be gathered against it for war. But in this war, God through an act of grace causes the Jews to look upon their crucified Messiah, and find salvation.

*Matthew 24
Christ’s words on the last days, with some commentary on Daniel’s outline of the last days.

*Romans 11-12:1
The Church that provokes Israel unto jealousy so as to be saved, and its relationship to the resurrection of the dead.

*2 Thessalonians 2:1-12
Paul’s “little apocalypse.”

*Revelation 12
The anti-Christ and his attack against Israel and the Church.

*Revelation 20
The millennial reign of Christ and the two resurrections.

*Revelation 21
The new heavens and earth.


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Jimmy H

 2010/1/8 21:44Profile
Giggles
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 Re: Art Katz's Eschatology

What is the thrust of his view point? Like a covenant theology foundation with a pre-mill stance?


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Paul

 2010/1/8 22:48Profile
KingJimmy
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Joined: 2003/5/8
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 Re:

I'm not so sure there is an easy way to neatly categorize Art's eschatology into any particular theological school without doing serious injustice to it. He is pre-mil and post-trib. I suppose one could say he has covenant theology views, but one could also say he embraces some dispensational views.

Art believes that God chose to bless this world through the seed of Abraham, chiefly in the person of Jesus Christ, but also through the Jewish nation as a whole. Though the Jews as a whole have never, and are not presently living up to their Divine calling, Art believes that by means of chastisement, the tribulation period, and through the agency of a prophetic Church that has come of age, God will eventually restore His people so that they can fulfill their calling, and embrace the Messiah whom they have corporately rejected up until this point in history.

The purpose of this plan is to ultimately demonstrate the wisdom of God, His righteousness, and to teach us the true nature of grace and salvation, so that His name might ultimately be glorified.

In brief, this is a very rough summary of Art's perspective. He was not alone in it, but he definitely has become it's chief spokesman.


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Jimmy H

 2010/1/8 23:38Profile
Giggles
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 Re:

Interesting. Do you know who the main influencers of his life are?


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Paul

 2010/1/9 0:57Profile
KingJimmy
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 Re:

He's pretty well read, so, everybody, lol. But so far as I've traced his theological influences, individuals such Adolph Saphir, David Baron, and George Ladd were major influences I know just off the top of my head.


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Jimmy H

 2010/1/9 1:17Profile
HeartSong
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 Re:

also Karl Barth.

 2010/1/9 2:05Profile
Tears_of_joy
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Joined: 2003/10/30
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 Re: Art Katz

Quote:
by Giggles on 2010/1/9 3:57:26 Interesting. Do you know who the main influencers of his life are?



[b]A:[/b] What have been some of the key influences that have helped you to form your worldview? Firstly, people.

[b]Art:[/b] I am hard-pressed to think of any outstanding influence that has come through men. I have been grateful for pastors, ministers, and publishers over the years, but I cannot think of a single formidable personality, someone like an A.W. Tozer; however, I would say the brother from New Zealand in Palmerton North, Ken Wright, is probably one of the singular influences to bring a degree of balance and fatherly warmth to me at a stage when I was yet a bit up in arms and needed to be quieted in a right way. I have always enjoyed my time with him, his counsel with me, and he was a real benevolent influence. I could probably think of others, but it would take some time.

[b]A:[/b] Okay, then, what about literature?

[b]Art:[/b] Watchman Nee, A.W. Tozer, Berkhoff, the Dutch theologian, and, principally now in the most recent years, Karl Barth, have all influenced me with their work. I especially love Barth’s books; he has been a great influence. Then, of course, Paul himself has influenced me through his Epistles. I could think of a number of other authors over the years that have been significant, usually theologians who are not well known. I love Charles Spurgeon, of course; Spurgeon’s Treasury of David, his commentary on the Psalms, has been a great blessing for me. I have a German theologian, Hans Joachim Kraus, who is also the author of a commentary that has been a blessing from yet another perspective, not so much inspirational, but more scholarly. Walter Brueggemann, an American theologian of the Old Testament and the Psalms, has been a significant influence. I am thinking of the German Old Testament scholars and the Hebrew scholars like David Baron and Adolf Saphir. Their commentaries on Israel and the Messianic prophecies are excellent.

[url=http://web.archive.org/web/20060503210955/www.benisrael.org/articles/art_biog_interv.htm]An interview with Alistair Reese, New Zealand, April 2001[/url]

In other places he also mentions T.A.Sparks.

 2010/1/9 8:32Profile
ginnyrose
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 Re:

Karl Barth? Are you kidding?

ginnyrose


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Sandra Miller

 2010/1/9 8:47Profile
wayneman
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 Re:

Ginny,

Barth and Katz may look like apples and oranges, but their hermeneutical method is identical, even if that method led them to some very different conclusions.

There is probably no danger of diverting this thread from Katz to Barth, so let me squeeze this in...

Barth taught that the Old and New Testaments are the record of God's revelation to man, but rejected the doctrine of inerrancy. This forced him to reject the evangelical method of interpretation which dissects verses under a microscope and bases entire teachings on a single verb or preposition, and then hopscotches thru the Bible, stringing verses together like a paper chain.

Katz also takes a more "professional" approach, viewing the Bible as a historical survey of God's progressive revelation. Most Messianic Jews read the scriptures this way.


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Wayne Kraus

 2010/1/9 10:25Profile
KingJimmy
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Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
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 Re:

Quote:

Karl Barth? Are you kidding?



It should be noted that Katz's fondness for Karl Barth came out of Katz's misunderstanding of Barth's Neo-Orthodox thrust. Katz was definitely not neo-orthodox. He seemed to genuinely misunderstand Barth as being an evangelical theologian. He never seemed to connect the dots with his understanding of Barth. The same can be said of some of the other German theologians he read. I think sometimes he simply allowed the wonderful things that these liberal scholars said to outshine the awful things they said. Katz definitely ate the meat and spit out the bones in regard to them.

And it should be noted that these liberal German scholars are worth studying from time to time, so long as one reads them in the right context, and remove the liberal theology that tends to connect their theology together. I've personally read several of Barth's books, and found them profitable for study and reflection. Indeed, picking out the errors of his books was sometimes a very difficult thing to do, and I can definitely see how Katz considered Barth to be one of us. The same can be said about Walter Bruggerman, who is an outstanding Old Testament scholar par excellence. Even though you will not hear a pure and unadulterated word of God from these men, you still do hear the echo's of God speaking in what they say. One just needs to be very discerning when reading their works.


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Jimmy H

 2010/1/9 11:09Profile





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