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Discussion Forum : Scriptures and Doctrine : Sanctification and Mortification

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KingJimmy
Member



Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
Charlotte, NC

 Sanctification and Mortification

The following is from a brief series of posts I did on Facebook. Forgive me if it seems slightly spliced together, but I would be interested in more discussion around this topic.

========

Contrary to popular dogma otherwise, sanctification is not a progressive work, rather it's a definitive and completed work. God "set us apart" (sanctified) at conversion, just as He "sanctified" the seventh day at the creation of the world. (See 1 Cor. 6:11)

I believe instead of growing in "sanctification," we rather grow in "glorification." We look at things too negatively. We look at our growing process as sinning less and less. But you never see such a definition given in all of Scripture. Instead, you read about abounding in the fruit of the Spirit. Our growth is about becoming more Christ in the bearing of fruit, not in sinning less and less. Though we sin from time to time, progress in the Christian faith is defined as going "from faith to faith and glory to glory." Truth be told, we are not supposed to be sinning anyway. So, sinning less frequent is not exactly a positive measure of growth. Growing in knowledge, faith, love, patience, etc, this is how we measure growth.

We do have to daily kill the flesh and strive against sin. But that process is known Scripturally as "mortification." Many wrongly use the term "sanctification" instead.

Sanctification is the event whereby Jesus Christ set us apart, made us holy, and has caused us to sit in heavenly places with Him, and gave us the Holy Spirit. This all happened at the new birth, which has caused us to be "set apart" from the rest of the world as one's who have been spiritually made alive at the present moment.

Mortification is whereby we kill our flesh and crucify it everyday. Think of it as "sanctification applied." We take what Jesus already did for us, and we apply it continually throughout the entirity of our lives every day, as we wrestle against sinful desires of the flesh.

I think it is important for us to get these concepts and words right though. Otherwise, unless we see ourselves as anything less than fully sanctified from the moment we are born again, finding victory over sin in our mortification experience can be all the more difficult, as we think somehow Christ did not supply us with everything necessary to living the life He would have us to life, so as to bear fruit for the kigndom, and be the witnesses He has called us to be.


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Jimmy H

 2009/10/26 18:48Profile









 Re: Sanctification and Mortification



Deleted by poster

 2009/10/26 21:10









 Re:

Waltern,

This is a personal study I have done on this topic, coming to different conclusions than the one you came to in the article you posted:

The law of God is written upon the very heart of the Christian (Ps. 40:8; 51:7; 119:34; Prov. 3:1; Isa. 51:7; Jer. 31:33; Rom. 6:17; Heb. 10:15-16), so that the Kingdom is reigning on the inside of them (Lk. 17:21).

Christians live a crucified life instead of a self-indulgent life (Matt. 16:24; Lk. 9:23; Rom. 6:2; 6:6-7; 6:11; 1 Cor. 15:31; Gal. 5:24), subjecting their bodies (1 Cor. 9:27) and mortifying the deeds of their flesh (Rom. 8:13), so that they don’t walk after the flesh (2 Cor 10:2; 5:15; Gal. 5:16).

Those who walk not after the flesh but after the Spirit have no condemnation (Rom. 8:1).

Christians are not sinners (Ps. 66:18; Jn. 9:31; Rom. 5:8; 1 Cor. 6:11; 2 Cor. 6:14; 1 Tim. 1:9; Jas. 5:16; 1 Pet. 3:12; 4:18; 1 Jn. 3:22) unless they backslide (Jas. 4:8; 5:19-20).

All Christians are saints (Acts 9:13; 9:32; 9:41; 26:10; Rom. 1:7; 8:27; 12:13; 15:25-16; 15:26; 15:31; 16:2; 16:15; 1 Cor. 1:2; 6:1-2; 14:33; 16:1; 16:15; 2 Cor. 1:1; 8:4; 9:1; 9:12; 13:13; Eph. 1:1; 1:15; 1:18; 2:19; 3:8; 3:18; 4:12; 5:3; 6:18; Php. 1:1; 4:22; Col. 1:2; 1:4; 1:12; 1:26; 1 Thes. 3:13; 2 Thes. 1:10; 1 Tim. 5:10; Phm. 1:5; 1:7; Heb. 6:10; 13:24; Jud. 1:3; 1:14; Rev. 5:8; 8:3-4; 11:18; 13:7; 13:10; 14:12; 15:3; 16:6; 17:6; 18:24; 19:8; 20:9).

And as saints Christians are sanctified (Acts 20:32; 26:18; 1 Cor. 1:2; 6:11; Heb. 2:11; 10:10; 10:14; Gal. 5:24; Jud. 1:1), that is, Christians are free from deliberate rebellion or sin (Jn. 8:34-36; Rom. 6:2; 6:6-7; 6:11; 6:18; 6:22; 8:2; Gal. 5:24; Eph. 6:6).

Christians keep God’s commandments (1 Jn. 2:3; 3:22; 5:2-3).

The righteous care about the well-being of others, but the wicked disregard the value of other people (Prov. 29:7; Jn. 13:35; 2 Thes. 3:13).

True obedience to God is caring about others (Matt. 12:11-12; Lk. 6:9). Love is a committal of the will to promote the highest well-being of all (Jn. 15:13; 2 Thes. 3:13). Love does not promote the ill-being or harm of his neighbor (Rom. 13:10). Love is absolutely unselfish (Jn. 3:16; 15:13; 1 Cor. 13:5). Love is the fulfillment of the law (Rom. 13:8; Gal. 5:14; Jas. 2:8). The one who loves God will keep His commandments (Jn. 14:15; 1 Jn. 5:2; 5:3; 2 Jn. 1:6).

Moral perfection is a moral obligation for all men (Gen. 17:1; Deut. 18:13; 1 Chro. 28:9; 2 Chro. 19:9; Ps. 4:4; Isa. 1:16; Matt. 5:48; Jn. 5:14; 8:11; 1 Cor. 15:31; 2 Cor. 13:11; Eph. 4:26-28; 1 Tim. 5:7; Rev. 3:2).

Moral perfection is not perfection of knowledge, since that is impossible and therefore cannot be an obligation. Moral perfection is purity of heart or motive (Matt. 5:8; 1 Pet. 1:22) which is perfection of heart or intention (1 Kg. 8:61; 11:4; 15:3; 15:14; 2 Kg. 20:3; 1 Chro. 12:38; 28:9; 29:9; 29:19; 2 Chro. 15:17; 16:9; 19:9; 25:2; Ps. 101:2; Isa. 38:3).

Moral perfection is having a clean conscience void of offense (Acts 23:1; 24:16; 2 Tim. 1:3). Moral perfection is defined as loving God and loving your neighbor (Rom. 13:8; 13:10; Gal 5:14; 1 Thes. 3:12-13; Jas. 2:8), a perfection of love (1 Jn. 2:5; 4:12). Moral perfection is a choice (1 Kin. 8:61; Ps. 101:2; Acts 24:16).

While physical perfection (glorification) is not attainable in this life (1 Cor. 15:50-56; Php. 3:11-12), moral perfection (sanctification) is attainable in this life (Gen. 6:9; 1 Kg. 15:14; 2 Kg. 18:3-7; 20:3; 2 Chro. 15:17; 2 Chro. 16:9; Job 1:1; 1:8; 2:3; Isa. 38:3; Ps. 17:3; 18:20-24; Lk. 1:6; Jn. 8:34-36; Acts 20:32; 23:1; 24:16; 26:18; Rom. 6:1-2; 6:6; 6:11; 6:18; 6:22; 1 Cor. 1:2; 1:8; 6:11; 2 Cor. 6:3; Heb. 2:11; 10:10; 10:14; Gal. 5:24; Php. 2:15; 3:15; Eph. 4:22-28; Col. 1:22-23, 28; 4:12; 1 Thes. 2:10; 3:12-14; 5:23; 1 Tim. 3:2; 3:10; Tit. 1:6-7; 2:12; 2 Pet. 3:14; 1 Jn. 2:5; 4:12; Jud. 1:1).

Though no man is above temptation, not even Jesus (Matt. 4:1; Mk. 1:13; Heb. 4:15), disobedience to God’s law is always voluntary, optional, and avoidable (Gen. 4:6-7; Deut. 8:2; Jdg. 2:20-22; Ex. 33:2; 34:24; Eze. 3:19; 12:13; 33:19; Jer. 18:8-10; Ps. 81:13; 1 Cor. 10:13).

 2009/10/26 21:22
murrcolr
Member



Joined: 2007/4/25
Posts: 1529
Scotland, UK

 Re:

A recognition of this fact of partial and entire sanctification would clear up difficulties in the minds of many people.

Paul writes to the Corinthians, calling them "sanctified," and yet immediately afterwards speaks of their carnality; and while he calls them "new creatures" in Christ Jesus, he bids them to "cleanse themselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness." The word "perfecting" means also accomplishing.

He also writes to the Thessalonians, whose faith had been spoken of abroad, and who were examples to all who believed in Macedonia and Achaia. He prays for them thus: "And the very God of peace sanctify you wholly."

Regeneration is sanctification, but it is partial sanctification; not a perfect sanctification, but partial in the sense of something still remaining in the soul that it is not in the province and power of regeneration to touch or remove.

So, to perfect the spiritual house in which God will dwell, two works are needed. Both works are perfect in themselves, but they are directed at two different states of the soul, and effect two different results or conditions. The first is aimed at personal sin and guilt; the second, at inherited or inbred sin. The first result is partial sanctification; the second is entire sanctification. Not until inbred sin is taken out of one by the baptism of the Holy Ghost and of fire, and not until Christ enters the soul as a perpetual indweller at the same time, is the grace and blessing of entire sanctification realized.


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Colin Murray

 2009/10/26 22:04Profile









 Re:




To truthfaithsave:

If the Christian can be fully sanctified while living on this earth then why does God require that he be rid of his body of flesh and blood before he is fit for the Kingdom of God?

Why is the “sanctified” Christian required to receive a resurrected body of flesh and bone, like Christ’s resurrected body, before Christ will allow him to enter into glory? If the Christian is truly sanctified, then he would not need a new body, would he?
(Luke 24:39-40) (1 Cor 15:45-58)

1 Cor 15:50
[color=990000][b]50. Now this I say, brethren, that flesh and blood cannot inherit the kingdom of God; neither doth corruption inherit incorruption.[/color][/b]


What is the definition of Sanctification? The definition of Sanctify? The definition of Sanctifying?


Noah Websters 1828 Dictionary gives us the answer:

SANCTIFICA'TION, n. [See Sanctify.]

1[color=990000][b]. The act of making holy (BUT NOT HOLY ENOUGH FOR THE KINGDOM OF GOD).[/color][/b] In an evangelical sense, the act of God's grace by which the affections of men are purified or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to a supreme love to God.
God hath from the beginning chosen you to salvation, through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth. 2Thess. 2. 1Peter 1.
2. The act of consecrating or of setting apart for a sacred purpose; consecration.
search [word => 'sanctify' ] returned 2 results.

SANC'TIFY, v.t. [Low L. sanctifico; from sanctus, holy, and facio, to make.]

1. In a general sense, to cleanse, purify or make holy.

2. To separate, set apart or appoint to a holy, sacred or religious use.
God blessed the seventh day and sanctified it. Gen. 2. So under the Jewish dispensation, to sanctify the altar, the temple, the priests, &c.

3. To purify; to prepare for divine service, and for partaking of holy things. Ex. 19.
4. To separate, ordain and appoint to the work of redemption and the government of the church.
John 10.

5. To cleanse from corruption; to purify from sin; to make holy be detaching the affections from the world and its defilements, and exalting them to a supreme love to God. Sanctify them through thy truth; thy word is truth.
John 17. Eph. 5.

6. To make the means of holiness; to render productive of holiness or piety.
Those judgments of God are the more welcome, as a means which his mercy hath sanctified so to me, as to make me repent of that unjust act.

7. To make free from guilt.
That holy man amaz'd at what he saw, made haste to sanctify the bliss by law.

8. To secure from violation.
Truth guards the poet, sanctifies the line.
To sanctify God, to praise and celebrate him as a holy being; to acknowledge and honor his holy majesty, and to reverence his character and laws. Is. 8.

God sanctifies himself or his name, by vindicating his honor from the reproaches of the wicked, and manifesting his glory. Ezek. 36.

SANC'TIFYING, ppr.
1. Making holy; purifying from the defilements of sin; separating to a holy use.
2. a. Tending to sanctify; adapted to increase holiness.


Sincerely,

Walter

Quote:

truefaithsav wrote:
Waltern,

This is a personal study I have done on this topic, coming to different conclusions than the one you came to in the article you posted:

The law of God is written upon the very heart of the Christian (Ps. 40:8; 51:7; 119:34; Prov. 3:1; Isa. 51:7; Jer. 31:33; Rom. 6:17; Heb. 10:15-16), so that the Kingdom is reigning on the inside of them (Lk. 17:21).

DELETED


 2009/10/26 22:04









 Re:

Glorification is physical perfection. This is received in the next life. It means that we will be without physical corruption. That way we will live forever.

Sanctification is moral perfection. That is to be received in this life. It is when we have a pure heart, when our character is love.

If we fail to distinguish between the moral and the physical, we fall into Gnosticism. We are not sinful because of the body that we are born with, since our body is just dirt and since God forms us in the womb. Therefore we do not need to have a new body to be free from sin. Our flesh is not sin, therefore we do not need to rid ourselves of our flesh, or to receive new flesh, in order to be free from sin. That is Gnosticism.

Jesus Christ was created with the same exact type of flesh that we were created with (Heb. 2:14; Heb. 2:17) and yet Jesus Christ was morally perfect before He had His glorified body which He received at His resurrection. We will receive our glorified bodies at our own resurrection, but we can be sanctified or morally pure before then.

We do not have to live after the flesh. Our fallen bodies do not force us to sin, neither will new bodies force us to obey. We cannot expect to be holy by force in Heaven, it will still be by choice. And if we do not choose to be holy in this life, we will never be holy in the next life (Rev. 22:11).

 2009/10/26 23:43
KingJimmy
Member



Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
Charlotte, NC

 Re:

When God sanctified the sabbath day at the creation of the world, did He do this gradually, or instantly all at once?


_________________
Jimmy H

 2009/10/26 23:43Profile
KingJimmy
Member



Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
Charlotte, NC

 Re:

In John 17, Jesus said the glory He received from the Father He has given to us. Paul also said we are to move "from faith to faith and glory to glory." No doubt, there is an end-time eternal glorification we are to never receive until the resurrection of the dead. But, we do have a sampling of that glory in this life, and that glory grows the more we become like Christ and bear His fruit in our lives.


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Jimmy H

 2009/10/26 23:48Profile









 Re:

In order to get saved, you need to forsake all of your sins. Therefore it is possible to be free from all sin in this life, because it is possible to be saved in this life. Salvation can only occur in this life. Therefore we must be able to forsake all of our sins in this life (repentance, sanctification, perfection). If we could not forsake all of our sins in this life, we could not be saved in this life, and thus we could not be saved at all.

Jesus didn't die to give a license to sin. Jesus died so that we could be forgiven of our sins if we give up our sins.

 2009/10/26 23:57
KingJimmy
Member



Joined: 2003/5/8
Posts: 4419
Charlotte, NC

 Re:

Quote:

In order to get saved, you need to forsake all of your sins.



You do not forsake your sins in order to get saved, rather, when you get saved you forsake your sin. There is a big difference. By this definition, you've yet to get saved, because from time to time, even you sin.


_________________
Jimmy H

 2009/10/27 0:01Profile





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