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Discussion Forum : Revivals And Church History : Has There Been Recent Revivals?

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philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re:

Quote:
1901 - Azuza Street Revival (william seymour)


Hi Greg
I think you are a little out with some of your dates. This is not being pedantic, its just that the order of some events is quite significant. The Azuza street movement, I'm not sure I would call this a revival, was more like 1906. There had been contact with the Welsh Revival of 1904 prior to the events at Azuza Street.

Frank Bartleman was the recorder of much of this time. His narrative begins with his arrival at Los Angeles on December 22, 1904. On April 8, 1905, he heard F. B. Meyer describe the then awakening in Wales. This stirred him deeply. He commenced to distribute accounts of it by S. B. Shaw and Campbell Morgan. These helped to stir desire and expectancy in many hearts. He and Evan Roberts exchanged some letters. In measure the Los Angeles Movement arose out of the movement in Wales, the more so in that a Los Angeles pastor named Smale had visited Wales and had returned with some quickening.

There being in the Churches and Missions but little spiritual liberty, a few earnest people met for prayer in a cottage, 214 Bonnie Brae Street, Los Angeles. On April 9, 1906, a member spoke in tongues. On Sunday morning, April 15, at the New Testament Church, Burbank Hall, a coloured sister spoke in tongues. When these things were noised abroad, the crowds came together. The meetings were removed to 312 Azuza Street. This had been a Methodist Church but was now a lumber store. Enough space was cleared of dirt and debris to lay planks on top of empty nail kegs, to seat possibly thirty persons. They were arranged in a square facing one another.

Intense excitement arose, augmented by some temporary concern in souls caused by the mighty earthquake which began on April 19, through which some ten thousand people were killed. The building was soon packed, tongues were frequent, the "heavenly choir" was heard often, men and women flocked in dozens to the "altar," meetings went on continuously, almost round the clock. "Some one might he speaking. Suddenly the Spirit would fall upon the congregation. God himself would give the altar call. Men would fall all over the house, like the slain in battle, or rush for the altar en masse, to seek God"

The Hebrides Revival was approx 1948-1952. There was a very limited work of a similar nature in Bradford somewhere around 1952-4.

Classic revivals have been marked by acute conviction of sin, in believers and in non-believers. Nevertheless I tell you the truth; It is expedient for you that I go away: for if I go not away, the Comforter will not come unto you; but if I depart, I will send him unto you. And when he is come, he will reprove the world of sin, and of righteousness, and of judgment: (Joh 16:7-8 KJV) This is why I question the Azuza Street as a classic revival, although there was real heart conflict at times.

Finney Revivals were also of 'conviction of sin' events. The 1859, 1904 Welsh Revivals and the 1948-52 Hebrides revival and the smaller Bradford events were certainly of this kind.

I have talked with people who experienced the 1904 Welsh Revival and the 1952 Bradford move.


_________________
His/yours
Ron B
www.biblebase.com

"Love perfecteth what it begins;

Thy power doth save me from my sins;

Thy grace upholdeth me.

This life of trust, how glad, how sweet;

My need and Thy great fulness meet,

And I have all in Thee.

Jean Sophia Pigott (1845-1882)

 2004/9/15 14:33Profile
Rahman
Member



Joined: 2004/3/24
Posts: 1374


 Re:



Brother Ron you wrote;

Quote;
This is why I question the Azuza Street as a classic revival, although there was real heart conflict at times.


i don't know if the Azusa St. Revival was one unto itself, or an offshoot of the Welsh Revival ... Either way, to me, it was God doing His thing, and man did it sound exciting ... i don't know very many folk these days truly excited by or about God ...

Anyhow i just wanted to share with you (and the others) what God did with a young black southern Baptist preacher who heard about Azusa St, went there, ((( edited out because of historical correction from brother Ron ))) was blessed by God and used to pioneer the Holiness/Pentecostal movement amongst American African saints that under Bishop Mason's spiritual and apostolic direction has grown from ten congregations in 1907, to the second largest Pentecostal group in America.

The membership of the Church of God in Christ (COGIC) grew from three million in 1973 to an estimated eight million in 1997 ... Not bad for a movement coming out of a non "classic" revival huh? ... '0)

While i don't believe in denomonations myself, a COGIC is where our Lord chose to send me, and while the old saints tell me the COGIC ain't what she used to be, i'm telling them to just hold on, because she's about to become even better than they remember!

If anyone's interested, it's a fascinating history of what God can do with one implacable man, who against all odd refuses to waver in the vision he believes he has from God ...


BIO & HISTORY OF BISHOP C.H. MASON
& THE CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST
http://pages.ivillage.com/pentecostalcathedral/id5.html
http://www.cogic.org/history.htm


excerpt;
Mason was licensed and ordained in 1891 at Preston, Arkansas, but held back from full-time ministry to marry Alice Saxton, the beautiful daughter of his mothers closest friend. To his greatest disappointment and distress, his wife bitterly opposed his ministerial plans. She divorced him after two years of marriage and later remarried. However, Mason refused to marry as long as Mrs. Alice Saxton-Mason lived.


PS - Brother Ron there are at least two COGIC's in your neck of the woods, you can find them at the bottom of the directory;

CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST DIRECTORY
http://www.arrowweb.com/klcogic/cogicdir.htm

 2004/9/15 15:54Profile
philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re:

Quote:
Anyhow i just wanted to share with you (and the others) what God did with a young black southern Baptist preacher who heard about Azusa St, went there, and even though having to remain outside of those meetings looking/listening in because of his race


The Azuza Street meetings were under the care of William J Seymour, a black second-blessing holiness preacher.


_________________
His/yours
Ron B
www.biblebase.com

"Love perfecteth what it begins;

Thy power doth save me from my sins;

Thy grace upholdeth me.

This life of trust, how glad, how sweet;

My need and Thy great fulness meet,

And I have all in Thee.

Jean Sophia Pigott (1845-1882)

 2004/9/15 15:57Profile
Rahman
Member



Joined: 2004/3/24
Posts: 1374


 Re:


Thanks Brother Ron ...

for that clarification ... hmmmmm ... now i've got to go back and correct my post, and research what early American African preacher i read about who had to sit outside the meetings to learn ...

But please don't let my faux pas overshadow my bigger point ...

"Not to bad results from a non "classical" revival ... huh?

And now that i think of it ... Can you explain to me what the difference is between a classical, and non classical revival?

As they say here in the States, "Inquiring minds want to know".

 2004/9/15 16:27Profile
Rahman
Member



Joined: 2004/3/24
Posts: 1374


 Re: EUREKA!!!


Brother Ron your historical accumen is most amazing!

Thanks to you i've now got the story straight ... It was brother Seymour, under Charles Parham, who had to sit outside the classroom (because of segregation laws) to learn ...


Quote;
"Because of the strict segregation laws of the times, Seymour was forced to sit outside the class room in the hall way. The humble servant of God bore the injustice with grace. Seymour must have been a man of keen intellect. In just a few weeks, he became familiar enough with Parham's teaching that he could teach it himself. Seymour ....."

http://www.azusastreet.org/wst_page2.html

Pictures from Azusa St
http://azusa-laof.org/azusa/azusa_pages/azusa_pictures.htm

And i'm most serious about wanting to know the definition between "classical" and "non-classical" revival ... Please share?

 2004/9/15 17:26Profile
philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re: The Pentecostal Movement

Quote:
"Because of the strict segregation laws of the times, Seymour was forced to sit outside the class room in the hall way. The humble servant of God bore the injustice with grace. Seymour must have been a man of keen intellect. In just a few weeks, he became familiar enough with Parham's teaching that he could teach it himself. Seymour ....."


Parham and his Topeka Bible School were really a fundamental aspect of the Pentecostal movement. It was at this school that they resolved to find an answer to the question 'what is THE initial evidence of the Baptism in the Spirit?'. Ask a silly question, and you will get a silly answer. The question, of course, presumed that there was a single absolute proof of the baptism in the Spirit. Working on the basis of the Acts alone they concluded that probability 'proved' that 3 out of 5 instances were accompanied by tongues, 4 out of 5 evidenced tongues at some point (as most likely at the baptism) and 5 out of 5 instances evidenced some tangible evidence (and most likely tongues). They also concluded that the events in the home of Cornelius showed that speaking with tongues proved the fact of the baptism in the Spirit, rather than realising that in this particular case speaking with tongues was evidence to reluctant Jewish converts that God had included the Gentiles in His plan of salvation.

Seymour was obviously convinced by the teaching he heard. These first Pentecostals were Second Blessing Holiness people who previously referred to their experience of entire sanctification as 'baptism in the spirit'. Subsequent to the events in Azuza Street they now had two experiences with a single description; baptism in the Spirit. They decided the culminating experience which had been accompanied by speaking with tongues was the baptism in the Spirit and became, initially, 3 stage Pentecostals; Regeneration, followed by Sanctification, followed by Baptism in Spirit (with tongues) as an enduement with power to serve.

Later a theological committee decided that they could not justify the teaching that 2 separate works of grace were necessary to deal with sin in the life of the believer. They consequently concentrated on Regeneration followed by Baptism in the Spirit (with tongues) as an 'experience distinct from and subsequent to new birth' which endued the receiver with power to serve. This brought one of the earliest divisions among the new movement, with some holding out for 3 separate experiences.

The New Testament Church of God and the Pentecostal Holiness churches retained a 3 stage Pentecostalism and this was imported into Scandinavia by T B Barrett. The Scandinavian Pentecostal churches used to be 3 stage Pentecostals. (Perhaps Lars will tell us if it is still so.)

The Pentecostal movement in the UK 'began' in Sunderland under the ministry of Alexander Boddy. Boddy was an Anglical minister who believed in Second Blessing holiness. (He was local sectretary for the Pentecostal League of Prayer whose best known characters were Reader Harris and Oswald Chambers. They subsequently dropped the word 'pentecostal' from their title. ) The Pentecostal League of Prayer set its face firmly against the new phenomena evidenced in Sunderland and Reader Harris was particularly outspoken, calling it (if my memory is accurate) 'the vomit of hell'.

Smith Wigglesworth, another second blessing holiness preacher, came into his Pentecostal experience under Boddy in Sunderland, and preached holiness all his life. In North America the Christian and Missionary Alliance led by A B Simpson ( who was succeeded by A W Tozer) took quite some time in making its mind up, but ultimately decided against the authenticity of the 'Pentecostal experience' although A B Simpson was a strong advocate of divine healing. They created the original four-square gospel; Jesus - Saviour, Sanctifier, Healer and Coming King.

here endeth the lesson... :-D


_________________
His/yours
Ron B
www.biblebase.com

"Love perfecteth what it begins;

Thy power doth save me from my sins;

Thy grace upholdeth me.

This life of trust, how glad, how sweet;

My need and Thy great fulness meet,

And I have all in Thee.

Jean Sophia Pigott (1845-1882)

 2004/9/16 5:17Profile
philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re:

Quote:
And i'm most serious about wanting to know the definition between "classical" and "non-classical" revival ... Please share?


Classical Revivals.
OK, here's my understanding. The word 'revival' is not a biblical word, but a label that Christians have put on 'out of the ordinary' times within the history of the church. Many Christians refer to Old Testament accounts as 'revivals' but they are really 'reformations'. They are changes in the outward behaviour of individuals and the nation of Israel. Some may say they could only have had genuine 'reformations' if they were energised by a genuine revival. but that brings us back to the need of a defintion for 'revival'. One of the most fundamental and far reaching 'reformations'in the Old Testament was that of Josiah the son of Manesseh. Perhaps it is significant that Jeremiah who was alive at this time never seems to mention it, although he did grieve for Josiah when he died. Perhaps Jeremiah realised that the changes occuring during the reign of Josiah were the last flush of a mortal illness rather than evidence of a cure.

There is no biblical theology for 'revivals' in the New Testament either. The only verse that could be used to support the concept being; Repent ye therefore, and turn again, that your sins may be blotted out, that so there may come seasons of refreshing from the presence of the Lord; (Act 3:19 ASV). I have opted for the ASV here as it makes the link between 'repentance' and 'seasons of refreshing'. The KJV seems to suggest that the 'times of refreshing' will bring the 'repentance'; Repent ye therefore, and be converted, that your sins may be blotted out, when the times of refreshing shall come from the presence of the Lord; (Act 3:19 KJV) but the ASV gets the order more correctly. The word 'that'has the sense of 'subsequently'.

One grouping of evangelicals regard a 'revival' as a time of special activity attributed to the Holy Spirit. Some believe this can be 'created' or 'promoted' and would speak in terms of 'holding a revival in Phoenix'. From this use of the term be get 'revivalists' who hold special meetings designed to facilitate special activity of the Spirit. Another group of Christians regard 'revival' as a mysterious, sovereign visitation of the Holy Spirit upon a community. The evidence of such a 'revival' would be profound conviction of sin. This kind of revival may be accompanied by lots of other phenomena, as was the 1904 Welsh Revival, but at its heart it is a 'sin-consciousness' event.

Although I can provide no biblical evidence for the existence of 'revival' there can be no doubt that God has frequently moved in mysterious sovereign power and when these events have been wider than a local community they acquire a date eg the 1904 revival etc. Edwin Orr in his studies has called these 'evangelical awakenings'. There is no biblical warrant for that phrase either, except perhaps in the book of Ezra; Then rose up the heads of fathers' houses of Judah and Benjamin, and the priests, and the Levites, even all whose spirit God had stirred to go up to build the house of Jehovah which is in Jerusalem.(Ezr 1:5 ASV) The phrase 'stirred up' here comes from a root meaning to cause someone to open their eyes. (The Message, which I never use ;-) says 'God prodded' which is a great picture)

This latter expectation of 'revival' is what I mean by 'classical revival'. It may have other accompanying features but its essence is that men and women, inside and outside the church, are awakened by God to realise their desperate sin condition and consequently reach out to God in heart prayer for a mercy and forgiveness. It is the sense in which the word would be used by Tozer and Ravenhill. In this sense I think the earlier chapters of the Acts are the account of a 'Jewish Revival';

Him hath God exalted with his right hand to be a Prince and a Saviour, for to give repentance to Israel, and forgiveness of sins.(Act 5:31 KJV)

And the word of God increased; and the number of the disciples multiplied in Jerusalem greatly; and a great company of the priests were obedient to the faith.(Act 6:7 KJV)


non-classical revivals
everything else not included in the above. ;-)


_________________
His/yours
Ron B
www.biblebase.com

"Love perfecteth what it begins;

Thy power doth save me from my sins;

Thy grace upholdeth me.

This life of trust, how glad, how sweet;

My need and Thy great fulness meet,

And I have all in Thee.

Jean Sophia Pigott (1845-1882)

 2004/9/16 6:05Profile
sermonindex
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"Pilgrim and Sojourner." - 1 Peter 2:11

Online!
 Re:

Quote:
Many Christians refer to Old Testament accounts as 'revivals' but they are really 'reformations'. They are changes in the outward behaviour of individuals and the nation of Israel.


Revival really results in the same thing, its an inward change that brings and outward difference. I think many LARGE revival's can become reformations but revival is simply the act of ressesitation, meaning to bring life to something that is dying or waning towards death. Its something that has fallen from its normal level and has dropped down below and therefore needs to be revived back up to the 'normal' level. And so it is with Israel many times they needed revivals, renewed interest in God and getting back to how they used to love and serve Him. Revivals in this instence can be more God motivated and spurned but I find in the old Tesatement that the prophets many time pray and plead for God not to forsake the people but renew them back to Himself.

Quote:
There is no biblical theology for 'revivals' in the New Testament either. The only verse that could be used to support the concept being; Repent ye therefore, and turn again, that your sins may be blotted out, that so there may come seasons of refreshing from the presence of the Lord; (Act 3:19 ASV).


I would agree in the epistles there is barely any talk of the concept of "revival" for the church was strong and still following God out of a pure heart and a first love. Even though there were problems doctrinally and morally in all the churches there was not a major falling away until we recieve word back from Jesus. The 7 letters of Revelation clearly paint a picture of the extreme need for revival in many of the churches and how Jesus even states to the one church thats its dead. (does the original indicate dead totally or just about to die) Either way they need to be ressitated or ressurected!

Quote:
Although I can provide no biblical evidence for the existence of 'revival' there can be no doubt that God has frequently moved in mysterious sovereign power and when these events have been wider than a local community they acquire a date eg the 1904 revival etc.


I am sure there are many more examples in the Old Testament of this type of concept of God "reviving" his people and the people crying out for God to revive them Himself.

Quote:
I think you are a little out with some of your dates. This is not being pedantic, its just that the order of some events is quite significant.


Thanks for the corrections sorry I was flying off the cuff there, need to get more displined and double check.


_________________
SermonIndex.net Moderator - Greg Gordon

“If Christians around the world were to suddenly renounce their personal agendas, their life goals and their aspirations, and begin responding in radical obedience to everything God showed them. the world would be turned upside down. How do we know? Because that's what first century Christians did, and the world is still talking about it.” - Henry Blackaby

 2004/9/16 8:45Profile
CJaKfOrEsT
Member



Joined: 2004/3/31
Posts: 901
Melbourne, Australia

 Re: Revival...what is?

Quote:

Yodi wrote:
I am becoming more and more open to this revival thing. Need to learn more about it, and most of all, it's something God needs to speak to my heart and the Holy Spirit needs to open my understanding to.



Yodi,
May I recommend


_________________
[b]Aaron Ireland[/b]

[u][b]How easily we forget how easy it's meant to be.[/b][/u]

[i]If we say that we have no sin, we deceive ourselves, and the truth is not in us. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness. If we say that we have not sinned, we make him a liar, and his word is not in us.[/i]
[b][1 John 1:8-10 KJV][/b]

[i]For we have not an high priest which cannot be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; but was in all points tempted like as we are, yet without sin. Let us therefore come boldly unto the throne of grace, that we may obtain mercy, and find grace to help in time of need.[/i]
[b][Hebrews 4:15-16][/b]

 2004/9/16 9:12Profile
philologos
Member



Joined: 2003/7/18
Posts: 6566
Reading, UK

 Re:

Quote:
I am sure there are many more examples in the Old Testament of this type of concept of God "reviving" his people and the people crying out for God to revive them Himself.


Hi Greg
I don't want to get into semantics here. I was just trying to provide a working definition of classical revival as distinct to any other kind.

Historically what we have done is to stamp a label of special times of God-consciousness. The label we have chosen is 'revival'. We might have called them outpourings or anything else. We get into circular discussions if we then try to define 'revival' from the word and say it means to re-vive, hence something that was alive. As the labelling was arbitary in the first place there is little to be gained by using the word we have adopted as an explanation.

I'm not suggesting that we find a different word either. The literature on 'revival' is too rich to lose just because the word begs the question.

I love the Acts phrase 'God has given repentance to Israel'. He gave it to Wales too in 1904 and the Isle of Lewis in 1948.


_________________
His/yours
Ron B
www.biblebase.com

"Love perfecteth what it begins;

Thy power doth save me from my sins;

Thy grace upholdeth me.

This life of trust, how glad, how sweet;

My need and Thy great fulness meet,

And I have all in Thee.

Jean Sophia Pigott (1845-1882)

 2004/9/16 10:02Profile





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