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 Signs of the Times

"A magnitude 5.4 earthquake struck just east of Los Angeles, the U.S. Geological Survey says. The quake's epicenter was about 2 miles southwest of Chino Hills and 5 miles southeast of Diamond Bar. A 5.4 quake is considered to be "moderate." "It made me feel a little dizzy," said iReporter Margot Wagner...."

http://www.cnn.com/

 2008/7/29 15:52









 Re: Earthquake Rattles Los Angeles


[b]Expert: L.A.'s 5.4 quake 'small sample' of one to come[/b]

LOS ANGELES, California (CNN) -- A magnitude-5.4 earthquake shook the Los Angeles metropolitan area Tuesday, leaving residents rattled but causing no serious damage or injuries.

[b]However, the temblor served as a warning to southern Californians who had not experienced an earthquake in some time: the "Big One" remains a possibility.

"This is a sample, a small sample," said Kate Hutton, a seismologist at the California Institute of Technology.

"This is somewhere between small and moderate." She said there is a 5 percent chance the quake could be a precursor to a larger earthquake. After 24 hours, she said, that chance will drop to 1 percent.

"Every earthquake relieves some stress," Hutton said. "It's usually only a drop in the ocean. In other words, the amount of stress released by this earthquake is minuscule compared to the amount that's built up and is building up for the Big One when it happens some day in the future."[/b]

http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/07/29/earthquake.ca/index.html

 2008/7/29 20:08
HeartSong
Member



Joined: 2006/9/13
Posts: 3156


 Re:

Volcanic eruptions reshape Arctic ocean floor:
study Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:13 PM ET

PARIS (AFP) - Recent massive volcanoes have risen from the ocean floor deep under the Arctic ice cap, spewing plumes of fragmented magma into the sea, scientists who filmed the aftermath reported Wednesday

The eruptions -- as big as the one that buried Pompei -- took place in 1999 along the Gakkel Ridge, an underwater mountain chain snaking 1,800 kilometres (1,100 miles) from the northern tip of Greenland to Siberia.

Scientists suspected even at the time that a simultaneous series of earthquakes were linked to these volcanic spasms.

But when a team led of scientists led by Robert Sohn of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts finally got a first-ever glimpse of the ocean floor 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) beneath the Arctic pack ice, they were astonished.

What they saw was unmistakable evidence of explosive eruptions rather than the gradual secretion of lava bubbling up from Earth's mantle onto the ocean floor.

Previous research had concluded that this kind of so-called pyroclastic eruption could not happen at such depths due to the crushing pressure of the water.

"On land, explosive volcanic eruptions are nothing exceptional, although they present a major threat," said Vera Schlindwein, a geologist with Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute for Sea and Polar Research, which took part in the study.

But the new findings, published in Nature, showed that "large-scale pyroclastic activity is possible along even the deepest portions of the global mid-ocean ridge volcanic system."

The mid-ocean ridge runs 84,000 kilometres (52,000 miles) beneath all the world's major seas except the Southern Ocean, and marks the boundary between many of the tectonic plates that make up the surface of the Earth.

When continental plates collide into each other, they can thrust up mountain ranges such as the Himalayas.

But along most of the mid-ocean ridge -- including the Gakkal Ridge -- the plates are pulling apart, allowing molten magna and gases trapped beneath the crust to escape.

Sohn and his colleagues gathered their data in July last year aboard the ice breaker Oden, using state-of-the-art instruments including a mutlibeam echo sounder, two autonomous underwater vehicles and a sub-ice camera designed for the mission.

Both sonar and visual images showed an ocean valley filled with flat-topped volcanos up to two kilometres (1.2 miles) wide and several hundred metres high.

 2008/7/29 21:02Profile









 Re:

Quote:

HeartSong wrote:
Volcanic eruptions reshape Arctic ocean floor:
study Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:13 PM ET

PARIS (AFP) - Recent massive volcanoes have risen from the ocean floor deep under the Arctic ice cap, spewing plumes of fragmented magma into the sea, scientists who filmed the aftermath reported Wednesday

The eruptions -- as big as the one that buried Pompei -- took place in 1999 along the Gakkel Ridge, an underwater mountain chain snaking 1,800 kilometres (1,100 miles) from the northern tip of Greenland to Siberia.

Scientists suspected even at the time that a simultaneous series of earthquakes were linked to these volcanic spasms.

But when a team led of scientists led by Robert Sohn of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts finally got a first-ever glimpse of the ocean floor 4,000 meters (13,000 feet) beneath the Arctic pack ice, they were astonished.

What they saw was unmistakable evidence of explosive eruptions rather than the gradual secretion of lava bubbling up from Earth's mantle onto the ocean floor.

Previous research had concluded that this kind of so-called pyroclastic eruption could not happen at such depths due to the crushing pressure of the water.

"On land, explosive volcanic eruptions are nothing exceptional, although they present a major threat," said Vera Schlindwein, a geologist with Germany's Alfred Wegener Institute for Sea and Polar Research, which took part in the study.

But the new findings, published in Nature, showed that "large-scale pyroclastic activity is possible along even the deepest portions of the global mid-ocean ridge volcanic system."

The mid-ocean ridge runs 84,000 kilometres (52,000 miles) beneath all the world's major seas except the Southern Ocean, and marks the boundary between many of the tectonic plates that make up the surface of the Earth.

When continental plates collide into each other, they can thrust up mountain ranges such as the Himalayas.

But along most of the mid-ocean ridge -- including the Gakkal Ridge -- the plates are pulling apart, allowing molten magna and gases trapped beneath the crust to escape.

Sohn and his colleagues gathered their data in July last year aboard the ice breaker Oden, using state-of-the-art instruments including a mutlibeam echo sounder, two autonomous underwater vehicles and a sub-ice camera designed for the mission.

Both sonar and visual images showed an ocean valley filled with flat-topped volcanos up to two kilometres (1.2 miles) wide and several hundred metres high.



It's amazing to see all of the past articles on volcanoes and earthquakes. I just found one from back in '06.I really enjoy science. It fascinates me even more so now that I am a christian.

Here's an article along some of the same lines as what yours was talking about:

"When a quake happens under water it can cause a tsunami. Wu said melting of the Antarctic ice is already causing earthquakes and underground landslides although they get little attention. [b]He predicted climate warming will bring "lots of earthquakes."[/b]

http://www.heatisonline.org/contentserver/objecthandlers/index.cfm?ID=5966&Method=Full





 2008/7/30 20:01









 Re:

The Beginning of Sorrows:

Matthew 24:6-8 For nation shall rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom: and there shall be [b]earthquakes in divers places,[/b] and there shall be famines and troubles: these are the beginnings of sorrows.

Mark 13:7-9 And great [b]earthquakes shall be in divers places,[/b] and famines, and pestilences; and fearful sights and great signs shall there be from heaven.


Check this out:

"Imagine the surface of Earth as a giant trampoline that accumulated a slab of ice over the winter, and you can get a sense of what a growing number of scientists say is in store for the planet as glaciers keep melting.

Once the trampoline's ice turns to water that drips over the edges in the warm days of spring, the concave elastic slowly rebounds to its original flat shape. That's how Earth responds as glaciers retreat, and the consequences promise to be ... interesting.

The reason is that one cubic meter of ice weighs just over a ton, and glaciers can be hundreds of meters thick. When they melt and the water runs off, it is literally a weight off Earth's crust. The crust and mantle therefore bounce back, immediately as well as over thousands of years. That "isostatic rebound," according to studies of prehistoric and recent earthquakes and volcanoes, can make the planet's seismic plates slip catastrophically, and cause magma chambers that feed volcanoes to act like bottles of shaken seltzer.

"It's unavoidable that glacial retreat will induce tectonic activity," says geoscientist Allen Glazner of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill..."

http://www.heatisonline.org/contentserver/objecthandlers/index.cfm?ID=5966&Method=Full


So we should be getting many more earthquakes and more frequently.



 2008/7/30 20:33
HeartSong
Member



Joined: 2006/9/13
Posts: 3156


 Re:

Giant chunks break off Canadian ice shelf
Cracks had been earlier found on Ward Hunt; 'more could go' this summer

MSNBC News Services - updated 4:54 p.m. CT, Tues., July. 29, 2008

OTTAWA - Giant sheets of ice totaling almost eight square miles broke off an ice shelf in the Canadian Arctic last week and more could follow later this year, scientists said on Tuesday.

In a development consistent with climate change theories, the enormous icy plain broke free sometime last week and began slowly drifting into the Arctic Ocean. The piece had been a part of the shelf for 3,000 years.

Temperatures in large parts of the Arctic have risen far faster than the global average in recent decades.

The ice broke away from the shelf on Ward Hunt Island, a small island just off giant Ellesmere Island in one of the northernmost parts of Canada.

It was the largest fracture of its kind since the nearby Ayles Ice Shelf — which measured 25 square miles — broke away in 2005.

Scientists had earlier identified deep cracks in the Ward Hunt Ice Shelf, which measures around 155 square miles. The shelf is one of five along Ellesmere Island in the northern Arctic.

"Because the breakoff occurred between two large parallel cracks they're thinking more could go this summer before the freeze sets in," said Trudy Wohlleben of the Canadian Ice Service. "More could be a piece as large as the Ayles Ice Shelf."

Ellesmere Island was once home to a single enormous ice shelf totaling around 3,500 square miles. All that is left of that shelf today are five much smaller shelves that together cover just under 400 square miles.

Melting ice shelves don't raise sea levels because they are already in the water, but their demise can speed up retreating glaciers, which do raise sea levels.

Sea ice, glaciers also shrinking
"The breakoff is consistent with other changes we've seen in the area, such as the reduction in the amount of sea ice, the retreat of the glaciers and the breakup of other ice shelves," Wohlleben said.

She said a likely reason for the shelf breaking away was a strong wind from the south.


more at:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25917328/

 2008/7/31 0:51Profile
HeartSong
Member



Joined: 2006/9/13
Posts: 3156


 Re:

When I was working in Alaska there was an extra seat on one of the helicopters going out to do research, so the scientists let me come along. We were very near the edge of a glacier when it started calving. It was an incredible experience - gigantic pieces of blue green ice crashing into the water . . . I went home totally exhausted from visual overload.

 2008/7/31 1:14Profile
ginnyrose
Member



Joined: 2004/7/7
Posts: 7469
Mississippi

 Re:

Quote:
Temperatures in large parts of the Arctic have risen far faster than the global average in recent decades.



Can this not be caused by

Quote:
What they saw was unmistakable evidence of explosive eruptions rather than the gradual secretion of lava bubbling up from Earth's mantle onto the ocean floor.



?

I always connected volcanic activity with heat. If it is connected could that not be why the ice is melting and not because of global warming? I read somewhere on the web the other day that the world's surface temperatures are cooler this summer then usual.

ginnyrose


_________________
Sandra Miller

 2008/7/31 8:35Profile
HeartSong
Member



Joined: 2006/9/13
Posts: 3156


 Re:

Corruption from within?

 2008/7/31 14:01Profile
HeartSong
Member



Joined: 2006/9/13
Posts: 3156


 Re:

Well ginnyrose, you may be on to something . . . I just ran into this. (The two videos in the article are pretty good - one shows how fast it is breaking up, and one includes calving.)


Antarctic ice shelf breaking up in dead of winter
Experts surprised that cold hasn't frozen trend, now expect quicker demise

MSNBC updated 12:28 p.m. CT, Fri., July. 11, 2008
New satellite images show that an Antarctic ice shelf continues to disintegrate — and even more surprising is that it's happening during the Southern Hemisphere's winter.

Experts warned last March, at the end of the Antarctic summer, that the Wilkins Ice Shelf was disintegrating more quickly, but they expected that the winter cold would put the trend in a temporary deep freeze.

At 6,000 square miles in size, Wilkins "is the most recent in a long, and growing, list of ice shelves on the Antarctic Peninsula that are responding to the rapid warming that has occurred in this area over the last 50 years," David Vaughan of the British Antarctic Survey said in a statement released by the European Space Agency as it revealed the satellite images late Thursday.

"Current events are showing that we were being too conservative, when we made the prediction in the early 1990s that Wilkins Ice Shelf would be lost within 30 years," he added. "The truth is it is going more quickly than we guessed."
Warmer water melting ice?

Ted Scambos, an expert with the U.S. National Snow and Ice Data Center, said warm sea water appears to be "reaching the underside of the Wilkins Ice Shelf and thinning it rapidly — and perhaps reaching the surface, or at least mixing with surface waters."

Ice shelf's demise
March 26: The Wilkins Ice Shelf is providing an ominous preview of rising temperatures. NBC's George Lewis reports.
Nightly News

"The scale of rifting in the newly removed areas seems larger, and the pieces are moving out as large bergs and not toppled, finely-divided ice melange," he added.

Scambos noted that "the persistently low sea ice cover in the area" could also be contributing to the breakup.

The satellite images, taken between May 30 and July 9, show how a piece of the shelf that connects to Charcot Island off Antarctica had narrowed to about 1.7 miles wide. By July 8, a fracture that could sever the ice bridge was visible.

"Since the connection to the island ... helps to stabilize the ice shelf, it is likely the breakup of the bridge will put the remainder of the ice shelf at risk," the European Space Agency said.

The breakup of ice shelves doesn't raise sea levels because that ice is already on top of sea waters, but their disintegration does speed up the process of glacial ice sliding into the seas from land areas on Antarctica and Arctic areas like Greenland. And that process does raise sea levels.

Other shelves have collapsed
The Wilkins Ice Shelf, a broad plate on the Antarctic Peninsula across from the tip of South America, is connected to the Charcot and Latady islands. It had been stable for most of the last century before it began retreating in the 1990s.

Other Antarctic ice shelves to collapse over the last 30 years are Prince Gustav Channel, Larsen Inlet, Larsen A, Larsen B, Wordie, Muller and Jones.

In Argentina, just north of Wilkins, an inland glacier last week began calving even though it, too, is in the dead of winter.
Perito Moreno, an Argentine glacier that draws tourists from around the world, even saw the collapse Wednesday of an ice tunnel that forms and disintegrates every four or five years.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25638651/

 2008/7/31 19:22Profile





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