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Discussion Forum : General Topics : What did early Christians believe about using instrumental music in worship?

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ccchhhrrriiisss
Member



Joined: 2003/11/23
Posts: 4488


 Re:

Hi Diane...

Quote:

roadsign wrote:
Quote:
But with everything, we should make sure that the heart is pure in regard to such things.


This admonishment makes me a bit nervous. Who gets to “make sure”? Who gets to judge each participant’s heart? And what standards of “purity” does one go by? I was once instructed: Only invite Baptists to perform music in our church. At least then we can be safe. mmmm

Likewise, do we trust the instructions of mere men? I think that we should strive constantly to have a pure heart before God -- and to "work out your own salvation with fear and trembling." I just don't think that we should call music (or instrumental music) the problem -- when it is not identified as such by Scripture. The root, so to speak, is with the heart of man.


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Christopher

 2008/7/1 15:01Profile
Miccah
Member



Joined: 2007/9/13
Posts: 1752
Wisconsin

 Re:


roadsign wrote:

Quote:


Yes, I can! Here are some verses:

“Each of you should look not only to your own interests, but also to the interests of others." Phil. 2:4
“Live in harmony with one another.” Rom. 12:16
"But everything should be done in a fitting and orderly way." 1 Cor. 14:40



Thanks for the quotes Diane. Great verses of course, but it is a stretch to use these verses in conjunction with calling music and its instruments sinful.

A lot of what people "perceive" to be wrong about music and instruments is that, a perception. Does this mean that folks use music and instruments for wrong purposes? Sure.

But the problem doesn't lie in the music or instruments used in making that music, it lies in the person who uses it.

There is a slippery slope being applied to music in general. Do we even realize that the singing of music in church buildings today was modeled after pagan rituals brought forth from man to begin with? Does this mean that we should stop singing music in church buildings because of men? no. We sing and make music to honor the Father, not to honor man.

The problem does not rest on music, it rests on the flesh.


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Christiaan

 2008/7/1 15:08Profile
roadsign
Member



Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 Re:

Quote:
The root, so to speak, is with the heart of man.


I fully agree with the thrust of your message, Chris! You ard saying: If you get diagnosis wrong, you will administer the wrong antidote.

By the way, I'm not afraid to work with immature or unsaved people in the music ministry. It is a great opportunity for growth, and rarely have I ever had a problem with a diva (someone who thinks they are God's special gift to the world and thus above all authority).

Quote:
Great verses of course, but it is a stretch to use these verses in conjunction with calling music and its instruments sinful.


I agree, Miccah! But they do get us back to the real issue!


Diane


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Diane

 2008/7/1 15:10Profile
mackaymarsh
Member



Joined: 2007/5/21
Posts: 132


 Re: Something else to consider: Worship Manipulation

I don't think you can manipulate worship, but we can human behaviour.

Shortly after my conversion, I was operating our Church’s sound-system. One Sunday morning during ‘praise and worship’ I noticed the ‘worship’ leader was singing the same type of upbeat songs trying to get the congregation enthused and excited, but not having much success. (Keep in mind, I am a new believer.) As they were singing one up-tempo song I increased the volume to the main speakers and as I did the crowd just came alive. I upped it some more and great ‘worship’ was seen from the people. During the song, I gradually slid the control back down to where it was, trying not to be obvious. The crowd subdued and the ‘worship’ participation waned.

Then, again, I increased the volume. Again the congregation livened up and ‘worshipped.’ Again, I brought the amps back down slowly. I did this a few times and it was an amazing scene. No one noticed. Maybe I should have been more obvious, but being new, I wasn’t about to rock the boat.

I enjoy pure worship, but then it was an eye-opener to this naive country-boy as how the amplitude affected people’s behaviour. Within a couple of years, the Lord led me away from that congregation to a small house Church. The worship was sweet and most often from the hearts of the people. Usually, one 12-string guitar and some tambourines were our only instruments with an occasional piano. I cannot explain you the difference; it had to be experienced. We would get lost in worship for hours.

Now, I also love the old worship hymns, with the large organs and such. But nothing yet has allowed me the ‘pure’ corporate worship of that small home church worshipping out of simple hearts. No hype or manipulation (no sound-system); just pure expressions of love and adoration.

In fact, I think I need to do that right now.
Wayne



 2008/7/1 15:13Profile
tjservant
Member



Joined: 2006/8/25
Posts: 1658
Indiana USA

 Re:

Good points Wayne. Brings back some bad memories from my past. Sold out rock concerts. People worked into a frenzie with just a single thundering drum beat.

Oh well.

Thought I would just add the lyrics to Matt Redman's song Heart of Worship. I am not against instrumentation, nor do I believe is Matt Redman, but I sure do appreciate this song.

When the music fades
And all is stripped away
And I simply come
Longing just to bring
Something that's of worth
That will bless your heart

I'll bring You more than a song
For a song in itself
Is not what You have required
You search much deeper within
Through the ways things appear
You're looking into my heart

I'm coming back to the heart of worship
And it's all about You
All about You, Jesus
I'm sorry Lord for the thing I've made it
When it's all about You
It's all about You Jesus

King of endless worth
No one could express
How much You deserve
Though I'm weak and poor
All I have is Yours
Every single breath

I'll bring You more than just a song
For a song in itself
Is not what You have required
You search much deeper within
Through the way things appear
You're looking into my heart

I'm coming back to the heart of worship
And it's all about You
All about You, Jesus
I'm sorry Lord for the thing I've made it
When it's all about You
It's all about You Jesus

Its all about you
Jesus


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TJ

 2008/7/1 15:31Profile
Compton
Member



Joined: 2005/2/24
Posts: 2732


 Re:

Also, I think it's worth noting that many Christians who don't lift their hands or become expressive during worship can have a very valid reason for not doing so.

I myself have an (edit) enthusiasm for various kinds of music ;-) but I think this appetite needs to be curbed in some public worship settings.

I feel the same way in general about separation. There seems to be a policy today that unsaved people are always welcome into every meeting regardless of the purpose of the meeting, and as such, 'good' music becomes part of the public church menu. On one hand I realize you can take separation too far, but for goodness sake every family has to have family time. There simply are times when family time is sacred, and there is a sanctity in the home that guests fail to understand.

I think the family of God, those of his household, should guard this sanctity even more so. Just as the home is to be a little church, the church should be...well a big church, as opposed to an arena, a stage, or a theater. We don't have music blaring at all times in my house...in fact I can get downright cranky if the kid's music interferes with our family attention to one another. Why do (edit: some) think God's house needs to be an arcade of light and sound at every meeting?

MC


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Mike Compton

 2008/7/1 19:35Profile





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