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 Should Christian Parents send their kids to public schools?

We've discussed homeschooling a little on this forum. Most of you know that my wife and I homeschool our children.

Sometimes because of finances, or other situations, parents have no choice but to send their kids to public schools.

But I'm interested in hearing from those who purposely put their kids in public schools, and do not necessarily think homeschooling is the better option... or perhaps oppose homeschooling all together. Would like to hear your thoughts on the matter.

I'm not trying to pick a fight! Just really interested in hearing opposing views on this.

And on the flip side of that... how many here do homeschool?

Krispy

 2008/5/28 14:51
MaryJane
Member



Joined: 2006/7/31
Posts: 3057


 Re: Should Christian Parents send their kids to public schools?

Greetings
I homeschool my children all five of them.

God Bless
MJ

 2008/5/28 14:56Profile
BenBrockway
Member



Joined: 2006/5/31
Posts: 427


 Re: Should Christian Parents send their kids to public schools?

Quote:

KrispyKrittr wrote:
We've discussed homeschooling a little on this forum. Most of you know that my wife and I homeschool our children.

Sometimes because of finances, or other situations, parents have no choice but to send their kids to public schools.

But I'm interested in hearing from those who purposely put their kids in public schools, and do not necessarily think homeschooling is the better option... or perhaps oppose homeschooling all together. Would like to hear your thoughts on the matter.

I'm not trying to pick a fight! Just really interested in hearing opposing views on this.

And on the flip side of that... how many here do homeschool?

Krispy




I'll give a little different perspective, as a formely homeschooled student...

I started out at a young age going to a Christian school. Unfortunately for me, in this situation, I was a PK and everyone in school knew that, and they didn't like it. Thoughts of me being a goodie-goodie and a tattle-teller, crossed most kid's minds and therefore I was one of the school's outcasts. I was always picked on, and never picked for P.E. sports or whatever. My spiritual growth kind of stunted for me as a child because of these things. I then was homeschooled and it was good. I didn't have to make friends, I had my brother and sister, and a pastor-dad, and mom. So, I grew in the Lord a good bit. I even ended up going back to the Christian school to finish out my last few years in "middle school," and it was all the same thing all over again.

But, quite honestly, I didn't really start to grow in the Lord until I went to public high school. It was strange. I had moved to a new state and going to the public school, I wasn't judged or mocked. Everyone accepted me. It was here at this public school that my faith grew ever so much stronger then it ever had previously. I am so thankful for the experience I had attending this public school.

That's my experience, though. I'm sure mine is different then most everyone's... ?

 2008/5/28 15:22Profile
ccchhhrrriiisss
Member



Joined: 2003/11/23
Posts: 4476


 Re: Should Christian Parents send their kids to public schools?

Hi Krispy…

I certainly support homeschooling. My wife and I have all but decided that we will homeschool our children (when we actually have children and they reach school age).

I asked a question in the last home school thread that was overlooked (I think). My biggest concern with homeschooling actually lay with questions concerning the college acceptance/scholarship rate. My wife and I both relied upon large, national scholarships (as well as some minor ones) to pay for our university educations. I received a large scholarship from NASA that paid for both of my undergraduate degrees (paying for my tuition, fees, books, travel expenses, while also providing summer internships at NASA). My wife relied on several major scholarships for both her undergraduate and graduate degrees.

My wife’s sister will be graduating from a large public high school next week. Lucia will graduate at the top of her class, and was consequentially offered full scholarships at several major universities – public, private and Christian – including several Ivy League schools. She decided to accept a “full ride” academic scholarship at Stanford University that is worth at least $275,000. It pays for her tuition, fees, room, board, books, travel expenses, summers abroad (tuition, fees, room, board, travel, etc…), insurance, private tutoring, a laptop, school supplies, and a living stipend. In other words, she will not have to pay for any of her education out of her own pocket or through student loans or grants (however, she is permitted to apply for and keep the Pell Grant/Stafford Loans for whatever she deems necessary).

My question concerns the availability of such scholarships to those students who are homeschooled. Are there any figures that indicate the acceptance rate of homeschooled children at major colleges and universities? While walking Lucia through the application process (neither of her parents speak English), I noticed that some schools do not make a distinction between “home schools,” “private schools,” or “public schools.” However, I noticed that some seem less willing to accept a home school student. Why? A “class rank” matters to some schools.

There have been home school students admitted into Ivy League schools like Harvard. However, some of those students received “admission points” for other reasons (alumni/heritage points, higher SAT scores, etc…). While it is true that your SAT/ACT scores are the most defining criteria for admission, they are not the deciding factor (by far).

Lucia was accepted at several reputable universities. She was offered admission to Yale, Princeton, Dartmouth, Stanford, Penn, Wellesley, Baylor, Rice, Vanderbilt, Duke, Georgetown, University of Chicago, and the California Institute of Technology – along with quite a few public and Christian universities (including just about every school in Texas). She was actively pursued by these schools initially because of her class rank at a large high school (she ranked between #1-3 throughout her junior and senior years – out of a senior class of over 500). She eventually decided upon Stanford since my wife and I hope to relocate to the area by the end of the summer (and she will have family in the area).

I just cannot help but wonder if these same sorts of opportunities would have been offered to Lucia had she been homeschooled. I am not saying that a public or Christian college of university would not provide a wonderful learning experience (as well as a much-needed degree). However, there are few scholarships that are offered to students who attend smaller local colleges and universities. Lucia’s brother, Emmanuel, graduated near the top of his class (out of about 575 students). He opted to enroll as an Architectural Engineering student at a smaller, local public university instead of one of the more prestigious schools that he received full scholarships. While he received plenty of the school’s local scholarships, most of them were offered for only the first year (to get him into the door). Emmanuel has been forced to take out student loans to pay for the cost of his education. He calculated that he will eventually borrow about $40,000 to pay for his education. If he had enrolled at a school like Penn or Princeton (where he was accepted), he would never have to borrow a dime in order to pay for college.

Anyway, this is just something that my wife and I have been pondering. Both of us attended lesser-known, but still well-respected public schools for our educations. However, even with all of the scholarships, grants, fellowships and awards, we both were required to borrow a little money to survive (especially for my PhD tuition and fees). My wife and I will likely homeschool our future children throughout elementary and junior high school. However, we aren’t quite sure about extending such homeschooling into high school. We pray that our children will be capable of shining the light of Christ and excelling in a public high school. However, we will certainly approach that situation with prayer and the mind of Christ when the time arises.

I would be interested in knowing your thoughts about whether or not it is advantageous to homeschool your children through high school.

Thanks!

:-)

*EDIT*
- I just wanted to add that Lucia was able to maintain and grow in the faith during high school. She is a strong believer from a strong Christian family and was able to influence many of her classmates with the knowledge of God.


_________________
Christopher

 2008/5/28 16:10Profile









 Re:

I dont have time to get into this right now, but will later. If I dont, remind me, ok?

But breifly most colleges now are actively recruiting homeschoolers. Homeschoolers on average score much higher on SATs and other college entrance exams. Also, colleges recognize that homeschoolers generally tend to be self motivated and more self-discipled than their public school peers. This has become very attractive to colleges.

However, I would recommend you dont send your homeschoolers to a secular college. Heck, I wouldnt even recommend most "christian" colleges. We need to be very cautious about that.

While academic excellence is certainly something we want for our boys... the reason my wife and I homeschool is mainly because we want to raise men of God who will rock this world for Jesus. Academics are secondary.

I'll write more later.

Krispy

 2008/5/28 16:49









 Re:

Hi Chris,

As I read your post I thought, 'well, not every homeschool student is going to need that type of further education...' but that's another topic. ;-) I did want to say that there are other alternatives to the traditional college route that many homeschool students have taken advantage of. It takes more discipline but takes less time and money and applies knowledge the student already has instead of causing them to sit through hours of unnecessary training just to get a degree. http://www.globallearningstrategies.org
Here's a few testimonials from students who have gone this route:

[i]Student Testimonies

Here’s how accelerated distance learning methods are helping students earn their degrees:


“Rather than spending seven years and over $100,000 earning my degree and becoming a CPA, I am using accelerated distance learning to reach this goal in less than three years and for less than $5,000” - Erik, Des Moines, IA


“ Accelerated distance learning allowed me to earn a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree by the age of sixteen.” – Alexandra, El Paso, TX


“ Using accelerated distance learning, I plan on earning my Bachelor’s Degree before my eighteenth birthday.” – David, Chicago, IL


“ Although I’m only doing part-time study, accelerated distance learning has enabled me to complete an average of three credits per week toward my degree. The skills I have learned are essential for success in my distance-learning program, but more importantly they will continue to benefit me throughout life.” – Kyle, Lakeland, FL


“ Instead of spending four years trapped on a college campus, I was able to graduate Cum Laude with my Bachelors of Science in Business and History, one year, seven months from my date of enrollment!” - David, Gary, IN[/i]

So, there are ways to overcome the obstacles the the world places out there for people who choose to take the less traditional path of homeschooling. And homeschooling is becoming more popular and more recognized, even as Krispy brought out.

As for a personal example of scholarships. I have a friend who obtained a degree with a major in physicology and minor in English mainly by taking CLEP tests and then he enrolled in [url=https://www.excelsior.edu/]Excelsior[/url] (I think) and finished up his degree. He recently decided on going to lawschool and after applying for scholarships all over the country he has a full scholarship for the University of Alabama Law School.

There are so many opportunities out there for homeschooled students. And I really think that homeschooling gives a greater opportunity for the student to pursue the topic or subject that interests him the most. I remember hearing a testimony of a young man who as a child was really interested in the guns/cannons of the civil war, and his parents encouraged him in his interest and he studied guns, metel, etc. And in his later teen years it opened up a great job opportunity for which he was already prepared because of his studying in that area. And I could go on with more examples...but I'll stop there.

My parents started homeschooling nearly twenty years ago. So that's all I ever really experienced. :) But it's definitely the route I'd want to go if I had kids. Oh, and this was the [url=http://ati.iblp.org/ati/]program[/url] I grew up in. It has great material and opportunities for young people.

~Joy



 2008/5/28 17:14
wonserwonton
Member



Joined: 2006/11/20
Posts: 59
Longview WA

 Re: Should Christian Parents send their kids to public schools?

My husband has a five year old daughter who will be of kindergarten age for the next school year. Due to circumstances in the custody arrangement, she will be attending public school. Private Christian schools have much higher tuition than we can afford, and the odds that my stepdaughter's mom would be willing to pay her half are very slim. So to public school it is.

If we ever get full custody, homeschooling will be reconsidered. At this point, however, it isn't an option. So we will pray that she learns the Truth, despite what the schools try to teach her. We pray that the Spirit of God would reveal to her that which is true and that which is false. If false teaching arise, we pray that she will discern the things which are of God. Prayer is all we can do.

I went to public schools throughout my education, and went to a secular college for a year. There were actually very few instances where I had to close my ears to what my instructors were saying (with the exception of when I took both cultural anthropology and sociology courses, both taught by the same instructor at the community college and found myself wincing often at his teachings)

As long as the children are able to learn the word of God from their parents, friends, AND church (not 'or'), there shouldn't be trouble. Especially if the parents are praying (in faith!) people. My parents didn't teach me much; my dad taught me some, but my mom is still not serving God. But I was able to get plugged in to a great group of people who not only taught me, but learned with me, and prayed with me. And despite 13 years of secular education, God protected me from learning and believing the lies that have infiltrated this so-called "education" system. I believe He can protect my stepdaughter in the same way.


_________________
Amy King

 2008/5/28 17:44Profile









 Re:

It takes praying and involved parents to get a child thru the public school system intact. I can certainly understand your situation, and clearly there isnt anything you can do at this point.

Unfortunately, most Christian parents in our society are no different than their pagan counterparts in the world. They are just as materialistic, therefore both parents work in order to have the big house, the SUV's, the X-Box, etc etc... so off to public school the kids go. They put money and possessions before God.

Most Christian parents allow their kids to listen to any old music, watch whatever movies they want, and waste 4 - 5 hours in front of the TV... parents AND kids.

Hardly read their Bibles, never have family devotions, never teach their kids about the Bible... much less about godly character, etc...

And then when Johnny or Mary turns out bad the first thing they blame... is the church. The church didnt do enough to keep their kid on the straight and narrow.

[b]wonserwonton[/b]... I completely understand and sympathize with your situation. You are an exception. Yes, pray. Yes, have faith in God to protect her... but also be prepared to do everything in your home AND your life to model for this precious little girl what a godly woman is to be. Teach her every minute you are with her about God and His Word.

And if you ever do get full custody (which I pray you do)... homeschool!

Blessings on you, sister...

Krispy

 2008/5/28 18:19
TrustingGod
Member



Joined: 2008/5/28
Posts: 1
Chillicothe Ohio USA

 Re: Home Schooling Vs. Public Schooling.

Greetings to all my Brothers and Sisters in Christ. I have not been on this forum very long, and just joined today as a "member". There are so many "WORTHLESS" "Christian" websites that will take your time, if you are not careful. However, THIS website has kept me coming back as I believe the members by and large, are genuine Christians on the journey to Heaven. Praise God. (All of my Scripture quotes are from the 1611 KJV Bible.) Now, The question asked by KrispyKrittr is one facing Christian parents the world over. Guess what. I'm not sure there IS a "right" answer! :-? I was brought up in a Holiness (non-tongues) Church all of my life. I lived in a very small Village, averaging about 1200 people. During my Jr. High school years, our own Church opened a "Christian School" (ACE). It brought quite a bit of strife in our Church as well as in the Community. In the Church, if you did not send your youngsters to this new Christian School, they you were about branded as a heretic. On the other hand, if you did send your children to the new Christian School, the "world" looked on and said "Oh, we see.... They're too GOOD to interact among US." In the 'middle' were the precious folks that chose "Home schooling" and they got it from BOTH sides! (My mother prayed and read Scripture each and every day prior to my sister and I leaving for school.) My parents kept me in public school, and soon after I graduated, the Christian School was closed, thus having caused "wounds" on the Body of Christ that were unnecessary. The majority of the kids that had gone to the new school, along with those who were home schooled, usually did better academically than those of us in public school. However, the downside was most of those same children had GREAT difficulty adjusting to living in "THE REAL WORLD" once they were out of that school or home. My wife and I had two precious children in 1981 and 1983. We struggled with this long before it was time to decide. One of the main verses that kept coming to our mind was: Proverbs 22:6. However, what about Jesus' prayer in John 17:15?! We finally started them in Christian School for a few years and then transferred them to the Public School, BUT, the School Principal, the teachers, the aides, etc. knew us by face recognition and our first names. That's because we kept VERY involved in their schooling. (I was a Fire Fighter/EMT who worked 24 hours on duty, and 48 hours off duty, so I got to spend much more time with this than the average working person would be able to.) In the last few years of their schooling, we were forced to move from the Dayton, Ohio area to the Mitchell, South Dakota area. Thus, we put them back in a Christian school there as we could not interact with the Public School in the manner we were accustomed to. For a period of time, we DID home school our children, and as I stated before, we were criticized by both the Church people and the secular neighbors. Although it's sounds so simple, the Truth is: Each parent has to pray and seek God's Will for THEIR children. If you do choose to home school or send them to a Christian School, then PLEASE on a supervised basis, let them interact with some of the secular children in the community. That way, under your leadership and guidance from the Lord, they will learn how to "Live in this world but not be a part of this world." Again, God bless ALL of you having to make this decision, and also God Bless all of you on these forums. =^..^= Don.



Roniya wrote:
Hi Chris,

As I read your post I thought, 'well, not every homeschool student is going to need that type of further education...' but that's another topic. ;-) I did want to say that there are other alternatives to the traditional college route that many homeschool students have taken advantage of. It takes more discipline but takes less time and money and applies knowledge the student already has instead of causing them to sit through hours of unnecessary training just to get a degree. http://www.globallearningstrategies.org
Here's a few testimonials from students who have gone this route:

[i]Student Testimonies

Here’s how accelerated distance learning methods are helping students earn their degrees:


“Rather than spending seven years and over $100,000 earning my degree and becoming a CPA, I am using accelerated distance learning to reach this goal in less than three years and for less than $5,000” - Erik, Des Moines, IA


“ Accelerated distance learning allowed me to earn a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree by the age of sixteen.” – Alexandra, El Paso, TX


“ Using accelerated distance learning, I plan on earning my Bachelor’s Degree before my eighteenth birthday.” – David, Chicago, IL


“ Although I’m only doing part-time study, accelerated distance learning has enabled me to complete an average of three credits per week toward my degree. The skills I have learned are essential for success in my distance-learning program, but more importantly they will continue to benefit me throughout life.” – Kyle, Lakeland, FL


“ Instead of spending four years trapped on a college campus, I was able to graduate Cum Laude with my Bachelors of Science in Business and History, one year, seven months from my date of enrollment!” - David, Gary, IN[/i]

So, there are ways to overcome the obstacles the the world places out there for people who choose to take the less traditional path of homeschooling. And homeschooling is becoming more popular and more recognized, even as Krispy brought out.

As for a personal example of scholarships. I have a friend who obtained a degree with a major in physicology and minor in English mainly by taking CLEP tests and then he enrolled in [url=https://www.excelsior.edu/]Excelsior[/url] (I think) and finished up his degree. He recently decided on going to lawschool and after applying for scholarships all over the country he has a full scholarship for the University of Alabama Law School.

There are so many opportunities out there for homeschooled students. And I really think that homeschooling gives a greater opportunity for the student to pursue the topic or subject that interests him the most. I remember hearing a testimony of a young man who as a child was really interested in the guns/cannons of the civil war, and his parents encouraged him in his interest and he studied guns, metel, etc. And in his later teen years it opened up a great job opportunity for which he was already prepared because of his studying in that area. And I could go on with more examples...but I'll stop there.

My parents started homeschooling nearly twenty years ago. So that's all I ever really experienced. :) But it's definitely the route I'd want to go if I had kids. Oh, and this was the [url=http://ati.iblp.org/ati/]program[/url] I grew up in. It has great material and opportunities for young people.

~Joy





_________________
=^..^= Don

 2008/5/28 18:24Profile









 Re:

My kids attend a public school because my husband prefers the public school system over homeschooling. It's a challenge for me and for them and it takes alot of prayer but the enemy can put all kinds of roadblocks in your way no matter what you choose. Everything in life takes much prayer.

 2008/5/28 18:40





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