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rookie
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Joined: 2003/6/3
Posts: 4801


 Evangelical Visitor Newpaper 1877

I found these newspapers archived in the Brethren in Christ church. According to this churches history, it was started in the late 1700's in Pennsylvania. The people that started this movement were called the River Brethren. They found their roots in Anabaptist and Moravian movement. They were later influenced by Wesley.

I have read the first paper and found that there is an abundance of the Spirit in these writings of the Brethren of that day...

Here is the first article...

A HEAVENLY LIFE ON EARTH

The diligent keeping of your hearts in heaven will maintain the vigor of all your graces, and put life into all your duties.

The heavenly Christian is the lively Christian. It is our strangeness to heaven that makes us so dull. How will the soldier hazard his life, and the mariner pass through storms and waves, and no difficulties keep them back when they think of an uncertain, perishing treasure. What life, then, would it put into a Christian’s endeavors, if he would frequently think of his everlasting treasure. We run so slowly and strive so lazily, because we so little mind the prize.

Observe but the man who is much in heaven, and you shall see he is not like other Christians. Something of what he hath seen above appeareth in all his duty and conversation. If a preacher how heavenly are his sermons. If a private Christian, what heavenly converse, prayers and deportment. Set yourself upon this employment, and others will see the face of your conversation shine, and say, Surely, he hath been “with God on the mount.”

But if you lie, complaining of deadness and dullness, that you cannot love Christ, nor rejoice in his love—that you have no life in prayer or any other duty, and yet neglect this quickening employment, you are the cause of your own complaints. Is not thy life “hid with Christ in God?” Where must thou go but to Christ for it? And where is that but to heaven where Christ is” “Thou wilt not come to Christ that thou mayest have life.”

If thou wouldst have light and heat, why are thou no more in the sunshine? For want of this recourse to heaven, thy soul is as a lamp not lighted, and they duties as sacrifices without fire. Fetch one coal daily from this altar, and see if thy offering will not burn. Light thy lamp at this flame, and feed it daily with oil from hence and see if it will not gloriously shine. Keep close to this reviving fire, and see if thy affections will not be warm. In thy want of love to God, lift up thy eye of faith to heaven, behold his beauty, contemplate his excellencies, and see whether his amiableness and perfect goodness will not ravish thy heart.

As exercise gives appetite, strength and vigor to the body, so these heavenly exercises will quickly cause the increase of grace and spiritual life. Besides it is not false or strange fire which you fetch from heaven for your sacrifices; the zeal which is kindled by your meditations on heaven is most likely to be heavenly zeal.

Some men’s fervency is only drawn from their books, some from the sharpness of affliction, some from the mouth of a moving minister, and some from the attention of an auditory; but he that knows this way to heaven, and derives it daily from the true Fountain, shall have his soul revived with the water of life, and enjoy that quickening which is peculiar to the saints. By this faith thou mayest offer Abel’s sacrifice, more excellent than that of common men, and, “by it obtain witness that thou are righteous, God testifying of thy gifts” that they are sincere. When others are ready, like Baal’s priests, to “cut themselves” because their sacrifice will not burn, thou mayest breathe the spirit of Elijah, and in the chariot of contemplation soar aloft, till thy soul and sacrifice gloriously flame, through the flesh and the world should cast upon them all the water of their opposing enmity. Say not, How can mortals ascent to heaven? Faith hath wings, and meditation is its chariot. Faith is as a burning glass to thy sacrifice, and meditation sets it to the face of the sun. Only take it not away too soon, but hold it there awhile, and thy soul will feel the happy effect.

Reader, art thou not thinking when thou seest a lively Christian and hearest his fervent prayers and edifying discourse, “ O how happy a man is this! O that my soul where in this blessed condition?” Why, I here advise thee from God, set they soul conscientiously to this work. Wash thee frequently in this Jordan, and thy leprous, dead soul will revive; “And thou shalt know that there is a God in Israel,” and that thou mayest live a vigorous and joyful life if thou dost not willfully neglect thy own mercies.
Signed
Saint’s Rest.

In Christ
Jeff


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Jeff Marshalek

 2007/8/10 0:25Profile
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Joined: 2005/2/24
Posts: 2732


 Re: Evangelical Visitor Newpaper 1877

Thank you Jeff,

Quote:
But if you lie, complaining of deadness and dullness, that you cannot love Christ, nor rejoice in his love—that you have no life in prayer or any other duty, and yet neglect this quickening employment, you are the cause of your own complaints. Is not thy life “hid with Christ in God?” Where must thou go but to Christ for it?



Praise God for the rich and continuing heritage of the Brethren movements.

These words are true, comforting and encouraging to the soul. I'm looking forward to these articles.

MC


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Mike Compton

 2007/8/10 0:47Profile
rookie
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Joined: 2003/6/3
Posts: 4801


 Re:

Weariness in Well-Doing

We may be fully persuaded in our minds that we are really doing good; not only in a general way, but that we are doing true gospel work. Yet our labors may seem to be entirely without the results we desired and expected. A feeling of discouragement, depression and weariness creeps over us. We find it difficult to shake it off; “Hope deferred maketh the heart sick.” Years of prayer and faith and effort have not resulted in the salvation of those who were near and dear to us. Our work in the church and in the world has proved equally unsatisfactory. We can see the undoubted success of others in disheartening contrast to our own failure.

If we are, however, well convinced that our motives are pure, that our eyes are single to the glory of God, that our intentions are sincere and that we have to the best of our knowledge and belief been engaged in real Christian service, how encouragingly do the words of St. Paul appeal to our fortitude and faith and fidelity; “Let us not be weary in well-doing; for in due season we shall reap if we faint not.” How considerate was he to include himself in his exhortation to us, and in applying his own encouragement to his own fainting heart. Hear him again: “Be ye steadfast, unmoveable, always abounding in the work of the Lord, forasmuch as ye know that your labor is not in vain in the Lord.”

Eternity alone will reveal the full effect of the fidelity of many a lowly and loving spirit. The works of some are manifest beforehand, going before the judgment; and some men they follow after. What revelations will startle us in the Day of Judgment. What was highly esteemed among men will then prove itself to be abomination in the sight of God. The meek and quiet spirit will appear priceless in the sight of God and an assembled universe. The abased will be exalted. The last will be first. Those who have patiently done the will of God will be pointed out by Christ as his nearest kin. When he who followed him through Gethsemane and Pilate’s bar and Calvary shall approach the great white throne, Christ’s finger shall point him out, while he shall say before all, “This is one of them,” This is one of those who endured shame and contempt as my loyal follower. Then he that was faithful in that which was least shall have greater commendation than he that was unfaithful in much. It is not what we have but what we are. It is not our gifts, but the use we make of them.

Merit lies not in doing something, in doing many things, in doing a great deal more than many others, in exhausting ourselves in almost super-human labors, in worrying ourselves and everybody else over what we fancy to be very constant and very praiseworthy business; but the final “well done, good and faithful servant,” well greet him who has simply and only, but fully done the will of the heavenly Father. The best servants are not those who do a great many extraordinary and wearisome and brilliant things, but those who do as they are bid. The best steward is not he who invests money as seems best to himself and to everybody else, but he who holds or places it in trust according to his Master’s strict directions. Well-doing is well-doing—doing God’s will—that and that alone. If this be so, then however weary we may be in well-doing as a mere matter of toil, we need never to be weary in well-doing as a matter of merit and final appreciation and exceeding great reward. Look, then, at thy work in the light of God’s word, of God’s will and of God’s final verdict.

Christian Standard.


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Jeff Marshalek

 2007/8/13 0:18Profile
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Joined: 2003/6/11
Posts: 9192
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 Re: Christian Standard

Quote:
It is not what we have but what we are. It is not our gifts, but the use we make of them.

Merit lies not in doing something, in doing many things, in doing a great deal more than many others, in exhausting ourselves in almost super-human labors, in worrying ourselves and everybody else over what we fancy to be very constant and very praiseworthy business; but the final “well done, good and faithful servant,” well greet him who has simply and only, but fully done the will of the heavenly Father. The best servants are not those who do a great many extraordinary and wearisome and brilliant things, but those who do as they are bid.



These are tremendous brother


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Mike Balog

 2007/8/13 7:35Profile
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Joined: 2003/6/3
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 Re:

A BROTHER’S RELIGIOUS EXPERIENCE

I will cheerfully answer your request in giving a brief outline of my history. But in this I know scarcely where to begin—my life is a book of experience, nevertheless I will be obedient. I well remember when a kind mother put me to bed and taught me to pray, “Now I lay me down to sleep,” etc.: And well do I remember when my wayward feet first began to run in forbidden paths, and that faithful monitor “conscience” would reprove me, but sin was the course of my life through my earliest days. My parents belonged to the German Reformed Church and their custom and creed was to catechize their children and confirm them to the Church, having been baptized in infancy. When I was sixteen years of age they began to persuade me and my older brother to go to the catechist: but we refused from time to time, until, finally, one Saturday noon, father told us we should go to be catechized or he would whip us. So seeing no other way we were compelled to submit. We attended lectures and a fine old preacher by the name of John Rebo instructed us in the catechism, and also pointed us to the “Lamb of God that taketh away the sin of the world.”

While we were more or less impressed with the state of our condition, I do not think there was one in the class that experienced a change of heart, I know, for myself, that I did not. But we were confirmed and called church members, and also partook of the emblems of Christ’s broken body and shed blood. I felt to pray and tried to get an opportunity to do so, by going out at the dusk of evening and thought to kneel by some fallen apple trees, but as often as I went there and walked around the trees, so often I also went away without prayer. Time rolled on and sin took the sway of my life and I never returned to the church communion, but grew bold in sin. I was naturally very jovial in disposition, and very fond of sport. I married at twenty three and began to struggle with the cares of life, labored hard, but still fond of mirth. I became much attached to playing the violin, and cultivated the habit of shooting mark, and it seemed as though I were to be overwhelmed in sin and folly.

Notwithstanding, the Spirit of God never gave me up, but I had no power to release myself from this captivity and bondage. Twenty-three years ago, however, when I was thirty-three years old, God stepped in among my little flock and took away our babe ten months old. We had the Reformed minister for the funeral occasion and buried our little son. For three days I had no impressions for good and I felt rather sorry that this dispensation of God’s providence should pass away without doing me any good. At the end of three days I began to feel something unusual about me but did not suspect the Spirit to be feeling about me. But, for one, two, and three days the strange weight that rested on my heart grew heavier and heavier, until I could not carry it any longer. The strange feeling was a sense of love. My soul was seemingly almost drawn out of me, and I began to look to God. Oh! Blessed day or night when I first strolled out into the fields by the light of the moon, in order to find him whom my soul was burning in love to know. When I got to the place where I appointed to pray—the same devil that 15 years before drove me away from the apple tree was present again, and suggested to me to go further—some person would hear me there.

But I remembered his artful tricks and right there broke down upon my knees in humble and sincere prayer to the Almighty God. I thought in my childlike faith that If I would only ask, God would give me joy for sorrow, beauty for ashes, the garment of praise for the spirit of mourning. But alas! Alas! I was a wretched sinner and God well knew it, and once having commenced prayer I took no denial, but instead of God blessing me as I asked him, I grew worse and worse from day to day, and as I always believed in a change of heart religion, I set my stakes for a sound conversion. I thought if I would only hold on and press my suite at a throne of grace I could prevail. But the ways of the Lord are not as our ways.

I thought perhaps I had not given myself up fully, and so strong was my desire that a little after sunrise I sent my hands to plant corn while I took another direction to pray, I kneeled down with the determination of a Jacob of old to wrestle until he would bless me. There, in a May forenoon I agonized in prayer to God for Jesus’ sake, sometimes lying flat on my face, as David of old, and sometimes otherwise until I heard the bells ring for dinner. Something whispered in my ear “trust God,” and I acted upon the impulse and rose to my feet and felt then the effects of my exposure to the sun and my agony of mind. I discovered my brain was much affected, and turning to a little stream I washed and walked home to the house. The hands had finished planting and were sitting at dinner. No one asked where I had been but that they might plainly infer from my appearance. During the afternoon my wife was working in the garden and I felt that I would lose my mind. I wanted to tell her not to allow them to whip me at the asylum, neither to allow any one to be rough to my little children, but I could not speak to her for the scalding tears that would course down my face. This was near Greencastle, Pa. Evening came and I felt in one sense quite composed by very weak in body and mind. I felt to promise God if he would restore me to my reason, I would cheerfully give him my life. Oh! God pity for Jesus’ sake. Amen. I took my Bible and read a verse or two and knelt with my wife in a short prayer, and so on for one week, and I found my strength returning. And although I was not blessed in the time and manner that I desired, yet by times, God poured his spirit freely upon me that I could not help shouting to his praise and glory. I enjoyed his glorious presence. Oh! His glorious love shed abroad in the penitent sinner’s soul. Oh! God pardon my delinquency in duty since I vowed to serve thee. Oh Lord! Help me still to yield myself a living sacrifice to thee.


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Jeff Marshalek

 2007/8/14 0:05Profile
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 Re:

UNITY.

“Behold how good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity!” Psalm 133, and the Savior says to the Father, “That they may be one, even as we are one.” St John 17:22.

Man through sin has wandered far from God: but God through the sacrifice of his Son has put it within the reach of all who will exercise a living faith toward God, and repent of their sins to come in unity with him through the gospel of his Son, and, if in unity with, God we receive the Spirit of God, which is in unity with all that are born of God. We are now admonished to keep the unity of the spirit in the bond of peace “Till we all come to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, unto a perfect man, unto the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ.” Ephesians 4:13.

How this may be accomplished is plainly taught in God’s word, which is “that we walk in the Light as he is in the Light, then we have fellowship one with another,” etc., and that we exercise a spirit of love and forbearance toward one another, always esteeming our brethren higher than ourselves and being in submission to them who are over us, believing that they have more experience and consequently know better what is for the good of the cause, striving to be the humblest and yet the purest of God’s children, and all to preach by our walk and conduct which will be in harmony with God’s Word in every thing, and we will be in that unity which is indeed pleasant, and how delightful is the service of the Lord when we are in this unity!

Then when we are in union with God and with his Word we cannot help but be in union with all that are in this same condition of mind, and the union will go further; we will be united with all the redeemed and all that will yet be redeemed, and our love will not be confined, but it will extend to all the children of God and to all for whom Christ died. Oh that we may all strive to be found in that unity, that we may be one in sentiment, one in love and purpose as members of one and the same body and all led by the Spirit of Christ and his Holy Word as revealed in the Gospel.

J. E. M. Canton, Ohio.


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Jeff Marshalek

 2007/8/16 0:08Profile
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 Re:

THE NARROW WAY.

It has been, and is yet the aim of some professors of religion, to get religion into such a position, that there is no cross connected with it. Men have been trying to dress up religion so that the offense of the cross should cease. And have not the masses succeeded in doing so, most effectually? Yea they make daily compromise with the world. Religion of our present time is so popular, that some professors think the world is almost converted. But if we try them by the word of God—what hope have they who believe and do as it suits them.

How often does the word of Jesus come to me? John 10:1, 9, “I am the door.” Has the Gospel changed? Or was Jesus mistaken, when he said: “He that taketh not up his cross daily can not be my disciple?” or when he said; “Ye shall be hated of all nations for my name’s sake.” Or was the apostle wrong when he said; “Yea all that will live godly in Christ Jesus shall suffer persecution?” No! No! the Master was not mistaken nor was his Gospel changed. Jesus says, “I am the way, the truth and the life: “ also that his word abides, when heaven and earth shall pass away. Then let us hold fast to the truth, no matter how much men are trying to invent smoother ways. The way that leads to life is a narrow one and few there be that find it.

C. S. Louisville


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Jeff Marshalek

 2007/8/17 1:46Profile
rookie
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 Re:

Let us not be too ready to condemn those that differ with us, without first examining the cause of our difference to see whether we are justified.

Not a day passes over the earth but men and women of no note do great deeds, speak great words, and suffer noble sorrows. Of these obscure heroes, philosophers and martyrs, the greater part will never be known till that hour when many that were great shall be small, and the small great.

Charles Reade Ingleside.



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Jeff Marshalek

 2007/8/22 2:39Profile
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Joined: 2006/1/31
Posts: 4991
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 Re:

Quote:

rookie wrote:
THE NARROW WAY.

Men have been trying to dress up religion so that the offense of the cross should cease


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CHRISTIAN

 2007/8/22 2:43Profile





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