SermonIndex Audio Sermons
Promoting Genuine Biblical Revival.
Looking for free sermon messages?
Sermon Podcast | Audio | Video

Discussion Forum : General Topics : When Jesus Played Hard to Get

Print Thread (PDF)

PosterThread
roadsign
Member



Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 When Jesus Played Hard to Get

The slogans, “What would Jesus do” or “What did Jesus do” are sometimes recommended as guidelines. After all, we are called to be like Jesus. Yet, what about this event:

A Canaanite woman from that vicinity came to him, crying out, "Lord, Son of David, have mercy on me! My daughter is suffering terribly from demon-possession."
Jesus did not answer a word. So his disciples came to him and urged him, "Send her away, for she keeps crying out after us."
He answered, "I was sent only to the lost sheep of Israel."
The woman came and knelt before him. "Lord, help me!" she said.
He replied, "It is not right to take the children's bread and toss it to their dogs."
"Yes, Lord," she said, "but even the dogs eat the crumbs that fall from their masters' table."
Then Jesus answered, "Woman, you have great faith! Your request is granted." And her daughter was healed from that very hour. Matt 15:22-28

Clearly, Jesus was not nice to the woman. Not only that, he seemed to break some significant Biblical precepts about love, relationships, and impartiality.

First of all, he ignored her.

Then when he finally did pay attention to her, he told her that his mission was only to Israel (and thus it was NOT for her). That wasn’t even true! What about Elijah who resurrected the widow’s son? Yet it seemed like she had no right to a healing for her daughter.

Then he referred to her as a dog. Nothing could have been more degrading. I hope I never do that to anyone!


Surely there is an overall spirit in this account that we must recognize. After all, it ended in a divine healing.

Amazingly the woman got through it. She did not back down. She did not walk away with her head down. She wasn’t even ruffled by Jesus’ words. It would seem like she “stood up to him” – and yet Jesus was impressed, calling if faith, and he rewarded her with a healing.


Why did Jesus dialogue like that?

What can we learn about Jesus from this incident,
or about ourselves?

Are there other times in scripture when Jesus played hard to get?

Has he ever played hard to get in your life? Why?

Diane


_________________
Diane

 2006/6/6 19:16Profile
Logic
Member



Joined: 2005/7/17
Posts: 1791


 Re: When Jesus Played Hard to Get

roadsign wrote:

Quote:
Then when he finally did pay attention to her, he told her that his mission was only to Israel (and thus it was NOT for her). That wasn’t even true!



Yes it was true.

Plus, Jesus wouldn't have lied about it.

Quote:
Then he referred to her as a dog. Nothing could have been more degrading.



Dog is a term for gentiles and she knew it, that is why she said thus...
[b]Matthew 15:27[/b][color=990000]And she said, Truth, Lord: yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table.[/color]

She was actualy calling Him Lord, even of the gentiles.

 2006/6/7 18:54Profile
Combat_Chuck
Member



Joined: 2006/1/27
Posts: 202


 Re:

Even if I am a dog, a scavenging, dirty gentile; My cry to God must be, Lord: yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table! I must seek the Lord earnestly and without reserve, that I may be first to see His face from the tree tops, to grab onto His cloak in faith, and to kiss His feet in worship.


_________________
Combat Chuck

 2006/6/7 19:34Profile
dohzman
Member



Joined: 2004/10/13
Posts: 2132


 Re: When Jesus Played Hard to Get

In this passage of scripture I see divine order---"to the jew first"---- and I see a principle, The true seed of Abraham are thoughs inwardly who respond in faith to the Living Word of God. Jesus was drawing this dear sister out and He brought her from one place (seperation) to a place of covenant where she was a partaker of the divine nature and the covenant promises.


The same happens where ever there's a true acknowledgement of seperation from God and a desperate cry for His mercy, and that's salvation.


_________________
D.Miller

 2006/6/8 0:38Profile
roadsign
Member



Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 Re: God's ways are not man's ways

Of course, I was using superficial reasoning in order to draw attention to the difference between God’s ways and ours. We must see it through God’s eyes or Jesus makes no sense. Notice that the disciples wanted Jesus to get the thing over with quickly – to get rid of the “annoyance”. But Jesus knew how best to work in her life. He was not settling for “easy believism”.
Clearly, it’s not about simple formulas, but about process:

Quote:
Jesus was drawing this dear sister out and He brought her from one place (separation) to a place of covenant where she was a partaker of the divine nature and the covenant promises.


I like this:
Quote:
Even if I am a dog, a scavenging, dirty gentile; My cry to God must be, Lord: yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their masters' table! I must seek the Lord earnestly and without reserve, that I may be first to see His face from the tree tops, to grab onto His cloak in faith, and to kiss His feet in worship.


Quote:
She was actualy calling Him Lord, even of the gentiles.


...And even if I haven't come from a church background, or I haven't lived right..... you are LORD ... and I know you can heal my child!

In our “instant pudding” society, how might Jesus be working in a similar way - delaying his miracles in order that faith and perseverance can grow?
I wonder, how might we be like the disciples – trying to short-circuit the process?
Diane


_________________
Diane

 2006/6/8 6:25Profile
Combat_Chuck
Member



Joined: 2006/1/27
Posts: 202


 Re:

I thought i'd contribute some thoughts on these passages from Various commentaries:

[b]Robertsons Word Pictures[/b],

Quote:

Mat 15:22 -
A Canaanitish woman (gunē Chananaia). The Phoenicians were descended from the Canaanites, the original inhabitants of Palestine. They were of Semitic race, therefore, though pagan.
Have pity on me (eleēson me). She made her daughter’s case her own, “badly demonized.”

Mat 15:23 -
For she crieth after us (hoti krazei opisthen hēmōn). The disciples greatly disliked this form of public attention, a strange woman crying after them. They disliked a sensation. Did they wish the woman sent away with her daughter healed or unhealed?

Mat 15:24 -
I was not sent (ouk apestalēn). Second aorist passive indicative of apostellō. Jesus takes a new turn with this woman in Phoenicia. He makes a test case of her request. In a way she represented the problem of the Gentile world. He calls the Jews “the lost sheep of the house of Israel” in spite of the conduct of the Pharisees.

Mat 15:27 -
Even the dogs (kai ta kunaria). She took no offence at the implication of being a Gentile dog. The rather she with quick wit took Christ’s very word for little dogs (kunaria) and deftly turned it to her own advantage, for the little dogs eat of the crumbs (psichiōn, little morsels, diminutive again) that fall from the table of their masters (kuriōn), the children.

Mat 15:28 -
As thou wilt (hōs theleis). Her great faith and her keen rejoinder won her case.



[b]John Wesley,[/b]
Quote:

Mat 15:22 - A woman of Canaan - Canaan was also called Syrophenicia, as lying between Syria properly so called, and Phenicia, by the sea side. Cried to him - From afar, Thou Son of David - So she had some knowledge of the promised Messiah.

Mat 15:23 - He answered her not a word - He sometimes tries our faith in like manner.

Mat 15:24 - I am not sent - Not primarily; not yet.

Mat 15:25 - Then came she - Into the house where he now was.

Mat 15:28 - Thy faith - Thy reliance on the power and goodness of God



[b]Adam Clarke,[/b]
Quote:

Mat 15:22 -
A woman of Canaan - Matthew gives her this name because of the people from whom she sprung - the descendants of Canaan, Jdg_1:31, Jdg_1:32; but Mark calls her a Syrophenician, because of the country where she dwelt. The Canaanites and Phoenicians have been often confounded. This is frequently the case in the Septuagint. Compare Gen_46:10, with Exo_6:15, where the same person is called a Phoenician in the one place, and a Canaanite in the other. See also the same version in Exo_16:35; Jos_5:12.
The state of this woman is a proper emblem of the state of a sinner, deeply conscious of the misery of his soul.
Have mercy on me, etc. - How proper is this prayer for a penitent! There are many excellencies contained in it;
1. It is short;
2. humble;
3. full of faith;
4. fervent;
5. modest;
6. respectful;
7. rational;
8. relying only on the mercy of God;
9. persevering.
Can one who sees himself a slave of the devil, beg with too much earnestness to be delivered from his thraldom?
Son of David - An essential character of the true Messiah.

Mat 15:23 -
He answered her not a word - Seemed to take time to consider her request, and to give her the opportunity of exercising her faith, and manifesting her fervor.

Mat 15:24 -
I am not sent but unto the lost sheep - By the Divine appointment, I am come to preach the Gospel to the Jews only. There are certain preachers who should learn a lesson of important instruction from this part of our Lord’s conduct. As soon as they hear of a lost sheep being found by other ministers, they give all diligence to get that one into their fold: but display little earnestness in seeking in the wilderness for those that are lost. This conduct, perhaps, proceeds from a consciousness of their inability to perform the work of an evangelist; and leads them to sit down in the labors of others, rather than submit to the reproach of presiding over empty chapels. Such persons should either dig or beg immediately, as they are a reproach to the pastoral office; for, not being sent of God, they cannot profit the people.
The wilderness of this world is sufficiently wide and uncultivated. Sinners abound every where; and there is ample room for all truly religious people, who have zeal for God, and love for their perishing follow creatures, to put forth all their strength, employ all their time, and exercise all their talents, in proclaiming the Gospel of God; not only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel, but to a lost World. Nor can such exertions be unsuccessful. There the pure truth of God is preached, many will be converted. Where that truth is preached, though with a mixture of error, some will be converted, for God will bless his own truth. But where nothing but false doctrine is preached, no soul is converted: for God will never sanction error by a miracle of his mercy.

Mat 15:25 -
Lord, help me - Let me also share in the deliverance afforded to Israel.

Mat 15:26 -
The children’s bread - The salvation provided for the Jews, who were termed the children of the kingdom. And cast it to the κυναριοις, little dogs - to the curs; such the Gentiles were reputed by the Jewish people, and our Lord uses that form of speech which was common among his countrymen. What terrible repulses! and yet she still perseveres!

Mat 15:27 -
Truth, Lord - Ναι κυριε, Yes, Lord. This appears to be not so much an assent, as a bold reply to our Lord’s reason for apparently rejecting her suit.
The little dogs share with the children, for they eat the crumbs which fall from their masters’ table. I do not desire what is provided for these highly favored children, only what they leave: a single exertion of thy almighty power, in the healing of my afflicted daughter, is all that I wish for; and this the highly favored Jews can well spare, without lessening the provision made for themselves. Is not this the sense of this noble woman’s reply?

Mat 15:28 -
O woman, great is thy faith - The hinderances thrown in this woman’s way only tended to increase her faith. Her faith resembles a river, which becomes enlarged by the dykes opposed to it, till at last it sweeps them entirely away with it.
Her daughter was made whole - Persevering faith and prayer are next to omnipotent. No person can thus pray and believe, without receiving all his soul requires. This is one of the finest lessons in the book of God for a penitent, or for a discouraged believer. Look to Jesus! As sure as God is in heaven, so surely will he hear and answer thee to the eternal salvation of thy soul! Be not discouraged at a little delay: when thou art properly prepared to receive the blessing, then thou shalt have it. Look up; thy salvation is at hand. Jesus admires this faith, to the end that we may admire and imitate it, and may reap the same fruits and advantages from it.



[b]John Gill[/b],
Quote:

Mat 15:22 - And behold a woman of Canaan,.... That is, of Phoenicia, which was called Canaan; so Shaul, the son of a Canaanitish woman, is, by the Septuagint in Exo_6:15 called the son of a Phoenician; and the kings of Canaan are, by the same interpreters in Jos_5:1 called kings of Phoenicia: hence this woman is by Mark said to be a Greek, that is, a Gentile, as the Jews used to call all of another nation, and a Syrophenician, being a native of Phoenicia, called Syrophenician; because it bordered upon Syria, and had been formerly a part of it, by conquest: so Cadmus, who is reported to have first brought letters from Phoenicia to Greece, is called (i) a Syrophenician merchant.

Came out of the same coasts; being an inhabitant, it is very likely, either of Tyre or Sidon: this shows that Christ did not go into these places, but only to the borders of them, since she is said to come out of them to him; who, having heard of him, and the miraculous cures wrought by him, and being informed that he was near, at such a place, as the Persic version says, "suddenly came forth out of a corner"; and the Ethiopic reads it, "out of the mountains thereof"; and made to the house where he was privately retired, and would have hid himself, as Mark suggests,

and cried unto him; with a loud voice, with much vehemency, being in great distress,

saying, have mercy on me; meaning, by curing her daughter, with whose case she was so much affected, that she made it, as it were, her own:

O Lord, thou son of David. The first of these characters expresses her faith in his power, dominion, and government, that all persons and things, and so all diseases were at his command, and control; and that being Lord of all, he could remove them at his pleasure: the other shows her knowledge and belief of him, as the Messiah, that being a name by which he was usually known by the Jews; See Gill on Mat_1:1 and which she, though a Gentile, might come at the knowledge of, either through being a proselyte to the Jewish religion, or through a general report which might reach, especially the neighbouring nations, that the Jews expected a wonderful deliverer to arise among them, under this character of the son of David; and from what she had heard of him, she concluded he must be the person.

My daughter is grievously vexed with a devil, which had took possession of her, and most grievously afflicted her: and her request to him was, that he would cast him out of her: believing he had power so to do, without seeing or touching her, only by a word speaking: her faith was like that of the centurion's.

(i) Lucian. Dialog. Deor. Coneil. sect. 2,

Mat 15:23 - But he answered her not a word,.... Not that he did not hear her, or that he despised either her person or petition, or that he was not moved with it; but to continue her importunity, and try her faith, and make it manifest: for like reasons the Lord does not always, and immediately, answer the requests of his people. This giving her no answer, either that he would, or would not help her, carried in it a tacit repulse of her, and a denial of assistance to her; and it seems as if she did for a while desist from her application to him, and betook herself to his disciples to plead with him for her:

and his disciples came; to the house where he was; who, it seems by this, had been elsewhere;

and besought him, saying, send her away; not in any shape, with any sort of answer, without curing her daughter, or without a promise of a cure; no, they desired she might be dismissed, with a grant of her request, to her entire satisfaction, as appears from Christ's answer: the reason they give is,

for she crieth after us; not only because she was troublesome to them, was importunate with them, and would take no denial from them: she followed them wherever they went; there was no getting rid of her: but also, because her case was so moving, was delivered in such an affecting manner, and her cries were piercing, that they could not bear them; and therefore entreat him, that he would relieve, and dismiss her.

Mat 15:24 - But he answered, and said,.... To his disciples, who knew how limited their commission was, that they were not to go into the way of the Gentiles, not to preach to them, nor perform miracles among them; and therefore could not reasonably expect that either the woman, or they, on her behalf, should succeed in this matter.

I am not sent, but to the lost sheep of the house of Israel; as a priest, or as a Saviour and Redeemer, he was sent to make satisfaction and atonement for the sins of all God's elect, and to obtain eternal redemption and salvation for all of them, whether Jews or Gentiles; but as a prophet, in the discharge of his own personal ministry, he was sent by his Father only to the Jews; he was the "minister of the circumcision", Rom_15:8 that is, a minister to the circumcised Jews; he was sent only to preach the Gospel to them, and work miracles among them, in proof of his Messiahship; and upon their rejection of him, then his apostles were to be sent among the Gentiles; but he himself was sent only to the Jews, here styled "the lost sheep of the house of Israel": by "the house of Israel", is meant the whole body of the Jewish nation, so called from Israel, the name of Jacob their father, from whom they sprung; and by the "lost sheep" of that house, are more especially designed the elect of God among them: for though all the individuals of that house were "lost" persons, considered in Adam, and in themselves, as the rest of mankind, and Christ, in the external ministry of the word, was sent to preach to them all; yet the elect of God are only "sheep": they are the sheep of Christ, of his pasture, and of his hand, whom he has the particular care and charge of; and who, in their natural state, are lost and straying, and could never find their way, or recover themselves from their lost state in Adam, and by their own transgressions; but he came to seek, and to save them, and to these his ministry was powerful and efficacious.

Mat 15:25 - Then came she and worshipped him,.... She followed the disciples into the house; and perceiving another repulse by Christ's answer to them, she pushes on, through all discouragements; her faith grows stronger, and her importunity greater: she had called Christ Lord, and the son of David before, but now she worships him as God:

Saying, Lord help me; a short petition, but what fully and fitly expressed her case: the object she prays unto is the Lord, by which she owns his sovereignty, dominion, and power: the request she makes is for "help", signifying that her case required it; that it was such, that she could not help herself, nor any creature help her, only he, which she firmly believed; and though it was her daughter, and not she herself, that was so miserably afflicted; yet such was her sympathy, love, and affection to her, that she makes the case her own, and calls helping her daughter, helping herself; for her daughter being relieved, she would be made easy.

Mat 15:26 - But he answered, and said,.... To the woman, as the Persic version reads it, and the sense requires:

it is not meet to take the children's bread, and to cast it to dogs; which he said, to try her faith the more, and make it the more illustrious; and that not so much from his own sense of things, as in the language of the Jewish people, and which she might not be a stranger to. By "the children", are meant the Jews, to whom the adoption belonged; who, as a nation and people, were the children of God in a large sense; being distinguished by many blessings and favours, which others had not, and being under the more peculiar care and notice of God; not that all of them were the children of God by special grace: by "the bread"; which belonged to them, is meant the external ministry of the word, and the miracles of Christ wrought among them: and particularly such outward favours which related to the good of the bodies of men, by healing their diseases, and dispossessing them of devils: and by "the dogs" are designed the Gentiles, so called by the Jews in a way of contempt, because of their ignorance, idolatry, and impurity. Christ here speaks not his own mind, as if he reproached the Gentiles, and held them in scorn and contempt, but uses the common dialect of the people; and which, this woman, living upon the borders of the Israelitish nation, was acquainted with; so that it was not so shocking and surprising, or quite so discouraging, as it would otherwise have been. The Jewish doctors say (k), that the idolatrous Gentiles are not called men, that they are comparable to the beasts or the field (l), to oxen, rams, goats (m), and asses (n): the foetus in the bowels of a Canaanitish servant, they say (o),

"ymd hmhb yemb dlwk, "is like the foetus in the bowels of a beast".''

Take the following passage, as an illustration of this, and as a further proof of the Jews calling the Gentiles dogs (p).

"A king provides a dinner for the children of his house; whilst they do his will they eat their meat with the king, and he gives to the dogs the part of bones to gnaw; but when the children of the house do not do the king's pleasure, he gives the dogs the dinner, and the bones to them: even so: while the Israelites do the will of their Lord, they eat at the king's table, and the feast is provided for them, and they of their own will give the bones to the Gentiles; but when they do not do the will of their Lord, lo! the feast is לכלבי, "for the dogs", and the bones are their's.''

And a little after,

""thou preparest a table before me"; this is the feast of the king; "in the presence of mine enemies"; אינון כלבי, "these are the dogs" that sit before the table, looking for their part of the bones.''

In which may be clearly discerned the distinction between children and dogs, and the application of the one to the Jews, and the other to the Gentiles, and the different food that belongs to each: and hence it is easy to see from whom Christ borrowed this expression, and with what view he made use of it.

(k) T. Bab. Bava Metzia, fol. 114. 2. Zohar in Exod. fol. 35. 4. Tzeror Hammor, fol. 1. 4. (l) Zohar in Gen. fol. 31. 1. & 34. 1. 2. (m) Jarchi in Gen. 15. 10. (n) T. Bab. Kiddushin, fol. 68. 1. (o) lb. fol. 69. 1. (p) Zohar in Exod. fol. 63. 1, 2. Vid. Tzeror Hammor, fol. 147. 4.

Mat 15:27 - And she saith, truth, Lord,.... She owns all that he had said to be true, that he was sent only to the lost sheep of the house of Israel: that she was indeed but a dog, a poor sinful creature, and unworthy of any favour; and that it was not right and fitting that all the children's bread should be taken from them and given to dogs:

yet the dogs eat of the crumbs which fall from their master's table. The Syriac and Persic versions add "and live": thus she wisely lays hold upon and improves in a very beautiful manner, in her own favour, what seemed to be so much against her. It is observed (q) of the Syrophoenicians in general, that they have all, in their common talk, something ηδυ και κεχαρισμενον "pleasant and graceful", as there is indeed in this smart reply of her's, who was one of that people. She suggests that though the Gentiles were but dogs, and she one of them; yet their common Lord and Master had a propriety in them, and they in him; and were to be maintained and fed, and ought to live, though not in such fulness of favours and blessings, as the Jews, the children of God: nor did she desire their affluence, only that a crumb of mercy might be given her, that her poor daughter might be healed; which was but a small favour, in comparison of the numerous ones he heaped upon the children, the Jews: nor would this be any more detrimental to them, than it is to the children, for the dogs, under the table, to eat of the crumbs that fall.

(q) Eunapius in Vita Libanii.

Mat 15:28 - Then Jesus answered, and said unto her,.... As one surprised at the strength of her faith, and the clearness and justness of her pious reasoning; and not concealing himself, and the designs of grace, any longer from her, breaks out in great admiration of her, saying,

O woman, great is thy faith! He seems surprised, that she, a woman, and a poor Gentile, should express such strong faith in him; calling him Lord, owning him to be the Messiah, worshipping him as God, believing him able to do what could not be done by human art; and though she met with such repulses, and even called a dog, yet still continued importunate with him, believing she should succeed:

be it unto thee even as thou wilt; let thy daughter be healed, as thou desirest, and in the way, and at the very time thou wouldst have it:

and her daughter was made whole from that very hour: power went forth from Christ, and dispossessed the devil; so that when she came home, as Mark observes, she found her daughter lying on the bed, quiet, and easy, and perfectly well. The conduct of our Lord towards this woman, and her behaviour under it, do, in a very lively manner, represent the methods which God sometimes takes with his people, when they apply to him in their distress; and the nature and actings of their faith upon him: as she, when she first applied to Christ for mercy and help, had not sword of answer given her; so sometimes they cry, and the Lord turns a deaf ear, or seems not to hear, and, in their apprehension of things, has covered himself with a cloud, that their prayer should not pass through; however, an immediate answer is not returned; yea, when others interpose on their behalf, and entreat for them, yet no favourable answer is returned, as was not by Christ to his disciples, when they besought him on this woman's account: and yet, notwithstanding all this, as she, they are not discouraged, but ply the throne of grace with fresh suits, acknowledge that the worst of names and characters belong to them: that they are unworthy of the least of mercies, and should be content with the crumbs of divine favour, but cannot go away without a blessing; they lay hold on every word of God, and hastily catch at it, and improve everything in their own favour, that faith can come at, and so, in the issue, succeed in their requests: effectual, fervent, and importunate prayer, the prayer of faith availeth much with God.


_________________
Combat Chuck

 2006/6/9 3:39Profile
Combat_Chuck
Member



Joined: 2006/1/27
Posts: 202


 Re:

The last paragraph of Gill's commentary (above), reminds me of something Leonard Ravenhill said,

[b]"Now I say very often - and people don't like it - that God doesn't answer prayer. He answers [i]desperate prayer![/i]"[/b]

:-)


_________________
Combat Chuck

 2006/6/9 4:54Profile
roadsign
Member



Joined: 2005/5/2
Posts: 3776


 Re: personal application

Quote:
The wilderness of this world is sufficiently wide and uncultivated. Sinners abound every where; and there is ample room for all truly religious people, who have zeal for God, and love for their perishing follow creatures, to put forth all their strength, employ all their time, and exercise all their talents,



Think how many of God’s people are eager to be someone, and do something important for God. Yet we bemoan the fact that “it’s” not happening. And we’re waiting for doors to open, for the big moment of revival. Yet doors ARE open for us more than we realize. There is a wilderness all around us that remains largely left uncharted because we Christians don’t seize our God-given opportunities. We don’t have the fervency and determination of our early explorers and pioneers. We want to be significant to God without paying the price. We just don’t have the faith to move forward into the wide-open area of intercession. Yet perhaps that is our highest calling.

Lately the Spirit has been impressing these thoughts on me. While I do pray, there is a big part of me that likes the comforts of this life and is reluctant to move further into uncertain seas. My flesh resists fasting and sleep-loss for the sake of others. I succumb to temporal distractions. Also, there is a part of me that wants to say, ‘Well, God will do whatever he wants, regardless of me. I can’t change anything.”

Really, if I were to take this problem to a deeper layer, I’d have to say, that it is my lack of love - even for my loved-ones. There is no denying that the Phonecian woman loved her daughter, and she was willing to make a fool of herself on behalf of her afflicted loved-one. She wasn’t worried about being “out of place” or of being rejected. Her love overruled all thoughts about etiquette, or thoughts of her “proper” place in society.

This story in the Bible is a very humbling to us who are the chosen. Here was a reject who understood very little about the ways of God, and who had likely dabbled in the occult. Yet, really she was the very type of person Jesus admired.

……and so the Spirit keeps nudging me: Do you REALLY desire to see me work in those people you are praying for? What will you sacrifice? That is an indication of your true desire.

Diane


_________________
Diane

 2006/6/9 8:25Profile
beenblake
Member



Joined: 2005/7/26
Posts: 524
Tennessee, USA

 Re:

Dear Diane,

Quote:
What will you sacrifice?



That is the ultimate question. What will you give? Are you willing to give your life? Are you willing to die for Jesus?

Many of us may be quick to answer "yes" or even say so. And then some of us become silent when faced with this question, because we know we are holding something back. Are you willing to give it all? Even that which you hold most dear to your life? For some it may be a child or spouse. For others it may be a job or career. For others it may be doctrine, religion. And for others it may be something unseen, like control.

If Jesus, our King, is able to work in us, we must be willing to become like dogs, would you not say? Are we willing to admit that we are not worthy? And though we are a dog, are we willing to persist in faith that our Lord and King can do anything? Is He not all-powerful?

The Lord is calling up people to work in the fields. However, before the Lord can use them in any way, they must first give up everything to Him. They must give up everything.....job, family, control, and life itself. And then, they must be open to whatever the Lord may command or do in them. In one moment, He may bless us. Will we enjoy His blessings and rejoice in them? Or will we feel guilty because we think we should do something else? In another moment, the Lord may call us to immense trial or even suffering. Will we persist? Will we hold fast to our faith in God? Will we keep our hope in Heaven? Or will we fall apart wondering why God has made us suffer because we had hoped for a better life on earth?

The Lord wants to work in us. But how should He work in anyone who wants to work in his/her own way?

What will you sacrifice? Will you sacrifice your own thoughts? Will you give up everything you have been taught? Will you open your heart and mind to the Lord? Will you fall on your knees and accept whatever He says no matter how harsh it may be? Even if He should say to you, "You are not worthy." Will you let your own faults be your defeat and say to the Lord, "I am useless."? Or will we say, "I am a dog, but you Lord are good. You are kind even to those who don't deserve. I am willingly. Please, use me."?

I am reminded of a 13 year old girl who asked the Lord to use her, and the Lord did. A short time thereafter, a shark bit off her arm. Ever since, she has been giving the Lord glory for such a loss. Check out her website: www.bethanyhamilton.com

When we are willing to lose it all for the sake of Christ, then we can be used for His work.

Pray for me that I will be willing.

In Christ,
Blake


_________________
Blake Kidney

 2006/6/9 10:26Profile





©2002-2019 SermonIndex.net
Promoting Genuine Biblical Revival.
Privacy Policy