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 recovery version study Bible

if anyone would like a free copy, you can get one at [url=www.biblesforamerica.com]www.biblesforamerica.com[/url]

just in case someone would be interested...

 2006/5/29 19:19
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 Re: recovery version study Bible

Here is some information on this translation and the reason behind it, the movement "LOCAL CHURCH" is the organisation that is running this website and other sites related to the recovery bible:

Quote:
Bible Translation
The Motive for Translation

The translation of the Bible is one of the greatest endeavors that Christians can set themselves to do, not only into those languages that lack a proper translation of the Scriptures, but even into those languages that already possess a number of good translations. Such an endeavor, far from evidencing a desire simply "to be different" or indicating disdain for what others have previously done, manifests a seriousness in Bible study and a love for God's Word that befits all believers. As disciples of the Lord, we should diligently study the Bible to the greatest degree possible, depending on what gifts God has graciously given us. If we are able to, we should even go so far as to translate the Scriptures on our own to better understand the text and to better apprehend the light in God's Word. If God has enabled us to delve into His Word this deeply, we do well to labor on His Word to this extent, for in translating from the original languages of the Bible, we so immerse ourselves in the text that we can only better perceive what the Spirit of God is saying to us in His Word. While some may ask us why we have translated the Bible when it has been done so many times and so ably by others, we should instead ask them why they have not. The Bible is the only book that deserves to be translated again and again, and each new translation affords the believers better access to the truth in His Word. In properly translating the Bible, we do not diminish its word or impact; rather, we glorify the Word of God and thus its Supreme Author.
The Need for Translation

The impetus for translating the Bible is almost as old as the Bible itself. In even as early a time as that of Nehemiah, translation of the Scriptures became necessary for the people of God, and the Bible itself records that Ezra the scribe, with many assistants, "read in the book, in the law of God, interpreting and given the sense, so that [the people] understood the reading" (Neh. 8:8). We know that part of this "interpreting and giving the sense" was rendering the words of Scripture from Hebrew into Aramaic, the language of the returned exiles; hence, the Bible itself validates its need for translation. Later, after the Old Testament canon had been written and the Jews had dispersed throughout the Mediterranean lands, the first complete translation of the Hebrew Scriptures was executed by Jewish scholars in Greek between the mid-third and late second century BC. For the most part, Old Testament quotations contained in the New Testament are drawn from this translation, called the Septuagint, and by this again the Bible validates the need for its own translation.
The History of Translation

Even though the early church, existing in a predominately Greek-speaking world, did not generally require translation of the Greek New Testament, translation into a number of the other languages of the Roman Empire began early and was widespread. Syriac, Coptic, Ethiopic, Georgian, and Armenian translations of the Scriptures were produced for the needs of the spreading church. And for the growing church in the West, a number of Latin translations, of varying quality, appeared. By the end of the fourth century, the need for a single, common translation into Latin motivated Jerome to bring forth his spectacular Vulgate, the translation of the Scriptures that sustained the church in the West for over a thousand years, well beyond the time of the Reformation. Even though we normally think of the Reformation as a period of blossoming for Bible translations, Jerome's Vulgate actually served as the Scriptural platform for the Lord's move at the time, since much of the polemical writing of this era is in Latin and depends on Jerome's Latin translation of the Bible. Further, many early translations of the Scriptures into English were made, not from Greek or Hebrew as might be expected, but from Jerome's monumental and classic work into Latin. For example, Wycliffe's translation of the Bible in the early 14th century, the first in Europe in nearly a thousand years, was based upon Jerome's Vulgate. But it is indeed the case that the Protestant Reformers, armed with a particular recovery of light and truth in the Scriptures, picked up the task of translating the Bible into the languages of the Europeans with full vigor. Luther, easily the most dominant figure of the Reformation, is also easily the most influential Bible translator of all time. His approach to other translations of the Bible into German, completed in 1534, influenced a number of translators in other languages, including William Tyndale, who, around the same time, was the first to translate the Bible into English entirely from its original languages. As the recovery of truth progressed across the centuries, serious students of the Bible each in turn took up the task of translating the Scriptures, either as personal exercises or as fully executed versions (e.g., J.N. Darby, Conybeare and Howson, Henry Alford, Kenneth Wuest). Their devotion to and love for the Bible made possible a broad range of good translations which have rendered immense help to those equally serious students who have not been able to translate the Scriptures on their own.
Material adapted from The New Testament Recovery Version, Witness Lee, �1985, 1991. Used by permission of Living Stream Ministry, Anaheim, CA. All rights reserved.


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SI Moderator - Greg Gordon

 2006/5/29 19:33Profile
Graftedbranc
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Joined: 2005/11/8
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 Re: recovery version study Bible

Love the Recovery version.

Graftedbranch

 2006/5/29 19:33Profile
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 Re:

Personally I think there are some good things to be gleamed in this translation of the bible especially the footnotes but I don't consider it to be the best or even the only translation to be used. I ordered a copy to be able to glean some things from it.


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SI Moderator - Greg Gordon

 2006/5/29 19:39Profile









 Re:

I absolutely agree that the recovery version is not the only translation to be used. To only use the recovery version would be to miss out on some real gems that are available, such as the Amplified Bible, the Darby translation, the American Standard (especially the one from 1901), and all or part of numerous other translations as well. I would say, though, that as far as I have seen and studied, the recovery version is the best one out there today. That is my opinion though, and that is speaking in terms of what I feel is the accuracy and propriety to be found in this translation. I also think there is a tremendous amount of light in the footnotes- though some may hold different doctrinal views on some of the points made- and there is no doubt a real supply of divine life available to all who read them.

 2006/5/29 20:00









 Re:

sermonindex,

I am curious which translation of the Bible you consider to be the best and why? I am not asking this to start any sort of argument or debate- I would just like to know.

Also, if I may ask, on what topics are you looking to do your gleaning from the footnotes in the recovery version? I may be able to recommend a few accordingly.

 2006/5/30 22:10
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Quote:
I am curious which translation of the Bible you consider to be the best and why? I am not asking this to start any sort of argument or debate- I would just like to know.


The [b]KJV[/b] version translation, no paticular revision date because their have been a few. I just think that simply the quality of people involved in the translation is beyond what modern day scholarship and devotion to the living Christ affords. I have a 2 part teaching by Chuck Smith speaking of the people that were on the KJV translation staff, it is quite impressive to hear some of these historical backings behind this version. I am also using the NLT (New Living Translation) at times for a modern abridgement of the bible in modern day venacular.

Quote:
Also, if I may ask, on what topics are you looking to do your gleaning from the footnotes in the recovery version? I may be able to recommend a few accordingly.


I probably wouldn't be able to answer this at all because I am quite ignorant of the footnotes in the recovery version translation. I will be intrested to take a look at it as time permits.


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 2006/5/31 2:02Profile
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Joined: 2006/1/27
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 Re:

I have heard from several Christians whom I respect that Witness Lee is a heretic... So, be careful...


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Combat Chuck

 2006/5/31 3:29Profile









 Re:

That rumor that Witness Lee is a heretic, and things of the like, have floated around for many years, but after extensive research into his books, and fellowship with co-workers of Witness Lee's (because he died around 10 years ago), some very notable sources have said quite the opposite about Witness Lee. Not only is he not heretical, but what he has to say is very beneficial and enlightening. The most noteworthy source is Fuller Seminary, which you probably know is one of the top seminaries in the country. Christianity Today has also put out an article on the same topic a few months ago, in which they include a quote from Fuller Seminary's statement. Hank Hanegraff (also known as "the Bible Answer Man"), of the Christian Research Institute, used to be very strong is saying Witness Lee teaches herasy, etc, but after doing more of his own research, rather than leaning on the words of others, he has taken a stand very similar to that of Fuller Seminary. He respects Witness Lee and the local churches very much, and he supports them. The list of very noteworthy supporters within the Christian community by no means stops there. While there are a number of opposers out there, if you get into the content of their argument, you will discover it very much lacks substance. Or, quite frankly, it consists of lies and slanders. As Dr. J. Gordon Melton (director of the Institute for the Study of American Religion and the pastor of the Emmaus United Methodist Church in Chicago) said, regarding one such opposing book, "the mistakes and misrepresentations in the book are so frequent and so consistent that it strains credulity to suggest that (it) is merely the product of poor scholarship."

I didn't really want to get into that though. Just wanted to let you all know you can get a free copy of the footnoted recovery version, which is an excellent offer.

 2006/5/31 10:21
tacklebox
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Joined: 2005/10/8
Posts: 196
Roanoke Rapids, NC

 Re:

I ordered a copy but never found time to really look into it, but my wife started reading it a lot. She liked the commentary in many parts, but when she began to ask me questions about some of the comments, I began to suspect that its doctrine was off some, mainly concerning the distinct differences in the Trinity. It seems that the commentary leans towards not separating the three into distinct persons but almost implies that when Jesus dies, He essentially became the Holy Spirit, at least that's what we thought it was suggesting. Needless to say, much of the commentary did seem helpful, but I would also suggest being watchful and discerning. :-)


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Christopher Wright

 2006/5/31 10:25Profile





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