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TMK
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Joined: 2012/2/8
Posts: 5485
NC, USA

 Peyton Manning and Christianity

Peyton Manning drinks Budweiser, doesn’t point to God after scoring a touchdown, and never prays to win a football game.

He’s also a Christian (stay with me here).

Manning accepted Jesus Christ as his Lord and Savior at the age of thirteen, and since then, his faith has been his number one priority. He grew up in a Bible-believing home, and he tries to be the best man he can be…but there’s an important reason why you don’t really hear much about that side of him.

He would rather his actions outshine his words.

Often times, we squish Christianity into this little box of do’s and don’t‘s, stuffing an infinite God into the puny confines of our own minds. We think we know what following Christ looks like, but in his book Manning that Peyton co-wrote with his dad Archie, Peyton reveals how his Christian walk may not look the same as anyone else’s—but it is no greater, and no lesser.

And this is exactly what he means…

Transcript via Minding the Truth:

“Like my dad, I make it a point when I speak to groups to talk about priorities, and when it’s schoolkids, I rank those priorities as: faith, family, and education, then football. For me generally it had always been the big four: faith, family, friends, and football. And I tell all of them that as important as football is to me, it can never be higher than fourth. My faith has been number one since I was thirteen years old and heard from the pulpit on a Sunday morning in New Orleans a simple question: “If you died today, are you one hundred percent sure you’d go to heaven?” Cooper was there and Eli [Peyton’s two brothers] but it didn’t hit them at the time the way it did me. It was a big church, and I felt very small, but my heart was pounding. The minister invited those who would like that assurance through Jesus Christ to raise their hands, and I did. Then he invited us to come forward, to take a stand, and my heart really started pounding. And from where we sat, it looked like a mile to the front.

But I got up and did it. And I committed my life to Christ, and that faith has been most important to me ever since. Some players get more vocal about it—the Reggie Whites, for example—and some point to Heaven after scoring a touchdown and praise God after games. I have no problem with that. But I don’t do it, and don’t think it makes me any less a Christian. I just want my actions to speak louder, and I don’t want to be more of a target for criticism than I already am. Somebody sees you drinking a beer, which I do, and they think, “Hmmmm, Peyton says he’s this, that, or the other, and there he is drinking alcohol. What’s that all about?”

Christians drink beer. So do non-Christians. Christians also make mistakes, just as non-Christians do. My faith doesn’t make me perfect, it makes me forgiven, and provides me the assurance I looked for half my life ago. I think God answered our prayers with Cooper, and that was a test of our faith. But I also think I’ve been blessed—having so little go wrong in my life, and being given so much. I pray every night, sometimes long prayers about a lot of things and a lot of people, but I don’t talk about it or brag about it because that’s between God and me, and I’m no better than anybody else in God’s sight.

But I consider myself fortunate to be able to go to Him for guidance, and I hope (and pray) I don’t do too many things that displease Him before I get to Heaven myself. I believe, too, that life is much better and freer when you’re committed to God in that way. I find being with others whose faith is the same has made me stronger. J.C. Watts and Steve Largent, for example. They’re both in Congress now. We had voluntary pregame chapel at Tennessee, and I attend chapel every Sunday with players on the team in Indianapolis. I have spoken to church youth groups, and at Christian high schools. And then simply as a Christian, and not as good a one as I’d like to be.

How do I justify football in the context of “love your enemy?” I say to kids, well, football is most definitely a “collision sport,” and I can’t deny it jars your teeth and at the extreme can break your bones. But I’ve never seen it as a “violent game,” there are rules to prevent that, and I know I don’t have to hate anybody on the other side to play as hard as I can within the rules. I think you’d have to get inside my head to appreciate it, but I do love football. And, yes, I’d play it for nothing if that was the only way, even now when I’m no longer a child. I find no contradiction in football and my faith.

Ah, but do I “pray for victory?” No, except as a generic thing. I pray to keep both teams injury free, and personally, that I use whatever talent I have to the best of my ability. But I don’t think God really cares about who wins football games, except as winning might influence the character of some person or group. Besides. If the Colts were playing the Cowboys and I prayed for the Colts and Troy Aikman prayed for the Cowboys, wouldn’t that make it a standoff?

I do feel this way about it. Dad says it can take twenty years to make a reputation, and five minutes to ruin it. I want my reputation to be able to make it through whatever five-minute crises I run into. And I’m a lot more comfortable knowing where my help is.” (Manning, pp. 362-364)

http://www.faithit.com/peyton-manning-shares-the-shocking-reason-why-he-loves-jesus-drinks-beer-wont-pray-to-win-entertainment/#.VryYgqk7ZLA.facebook


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Todd

 2016/2/11 10:09Profile
Oracio
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Joined: 2007/6/26
Posts: 2093
Whittier CA USA

 Re: Peyton Manning and Christianity

Quote:
Christians drink beer. So do non-Christians. Christians also make mistakes, just as non-Christians do. My faith doesn’t make me perfect, it makes me forgiven, and provides me the assurance I looked for half my life ago.


I Don’t have any problem with him not being that vocal about God. I agree with the importance of our actions speaking louder than our words. I do however have a problem with him having no concern at all about stumbling others with alcohol, having such a huge public platform.

Many professing Christians today say that they are not perfect but just forgiven. It’s a common cliché. But is that really the life-changing gospel of Jesus Christ? That we are just forgiven? What about the truth of 2 Cor. 5:17, “If anyone is in Christ he is a new creation…”? What about the truth that when the Holy Ghost truly comes to a soul He will convict of sin, righteousness and judgment (Jn. 16:8)? When a professing Christian tries to justify his sins by saying he/she is not perfect but just forgiven, I get concerned for their soul. It reveals that they do not have the conviction of the Holy Spirit at work in their hearts and lives.

Hate to say it but sadly, this “Christian testimony” sounds like another sad product of the modern altar call, sinner’s prayer, easy-believism gospel.


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Oracio

 2016/2/11 12:26Profile
Oracio
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Joined: 2007/6/26
Posts: 2093
Whittier CA USA

 Re:

Also, many times a false convert does not want to be that vocal about Christ because he/she is ashamed of Him and His words, and because they know that they are not truly seeking to walk as Christ walked. So at some level there is some conviction deep down in their conscience but not the type that accompanies true conversion.

"For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, of him the Son of Man also will be ashamed when He comes in the glory of His Father with the holy angels."-Mark 8:38


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Oracio

 2016/2/11 12:42Profile
DEADn
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Joined: 2011/1/12
Posts: 1357
Lakeland FL

 Re:

I am also reminded of Rev 12:11

11"And they overcame him because of the blood of the Lamb and because of the word of their testimony, and they did not love their life even when faced with death.


At some points Christians have to be vocal about their faith even if it isn't until the day they die.


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John

 2016/2/11 12:53Profile
TMK
Member



Joined: 2012/2/8
Posts: 5485
NC, USA

 Re:

O-

You seem to be jumping to the conclusion that him drinking a beer is sinning. I am not saying that drinking a beer is never sinning, but I have seen no evidence of him being prone to drunkenness.


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Todd

 2016/2/11 12:54Profile
Oracio
Member



Joined: 2007/6/26
Posts: 2093
Whittier CA USA

 Re:

T-

Within the context of the US, considering that drinking alcohol is such a huge stumbling block to so many, I would argue that drinking beer is sinning for that simple reason. Manning seems to have absolutely no concern about the issue of stumbling so many as a public figure. It would be comparable to a pastor who chooses to drink beer despite the huge ramifications of stumbling others. A true shepherd would not do that to Christ's flock just to keep his little pleasure. Now, if we were talking about places like Germany it would be different.


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Oracio

 2016/2/11 13:09Profile
Oracio
Member



Joined: 2007/6/26
Posts: 2093
Whittier CA USA

 Re:

This “church” has what they call “Beer & Hymns” in order to attract the lost. It’s part of this newer, progressive, emergent church culture. Imo it's apostasy at its finest on display in this vid:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HSHyG8BReHA


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Oracio

 2016/2/11 14:04Profile









 Re:

Peyton Manning is not a Christian. He is a Mormon. That is an unbiblical heretical cult. That makes the whole discussion "off".

 2016/2/11 15:35
Solomon101
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Joined: 2008/4/1
Posts: 531
America's Heartand

 Re:

It always cracks me up to read these threads! Same song ... next verse. :-)

Me thinks some folks may not have a full knowledge of the history of alcohol in the church. Just as a few examples ....

Martin Luther - As you may, or may not, be aware Luther loved to partake of alcohol. In his own words he preferred a good wine and malt liquors over beers but had a definite fondness for them both. Another poster stated earlier that

Quote:
This “church” has what they call “Beer & Hymns” in order to attract the lost. It’s part of this newer, progressive, emergent church culture. Imo it's apostasy at its finest on display:

Ironically this was a method Luther often employed. He could consistently be found at a tavern drinking a stein of ale and discussing the magnitude and glory of God! Sounds far more old school than progressive emergent to me personally.

Melangthon - The great "mind" and theologian of the Reformation had wine nightly.

John Calvin - He enjoyed wine a great deal. In fact part of his ministerial salary in service to Geneva was paid out in barrels of wine. This was to the tune of 250 gallons per year! He of course also entertained guests with this amount .... but still!

The Pilgrims - The night before setting sail upon the Mayflower and heading to Plymouth Rock in America they had a send off dinner. Including, in their own words, "pudding and wine". Among the supplies they brought for their American journey they had casks of beer and pipes of gin and brandy. The Puritan Pilgrims aboard the Arabella brought to America with them 42 tuns of beer and 10,000 gallons of wine. A tun of beer is a wooden barrel used to measure. It is equal to 252 gallons. Do the math with the beer the Pilgrims brought that day! They also brought 7,560 gallons of malt to set up alcohol brewing services as soon as they reached the new land! This was just the public supply. Each family also normally brought their own personal backup barrels. The historic record also purports them to have distilled wine to brandy on the journey from England.

The Apostle Paul At Corinth - Granted that Paul instructed the Corinthians to quit coming to The Lords Supper and engaging in bouts of gluttony and drunkenness. He did indeed advise them not to cause those who are weak and immature in conscience to "stumble". However, this other ditty seems to be missed by most. Consider this ..... - Paul never in any way advised them to stop drinking wine! He told them to do it at home if they were going to drink these larger quantities. Let that sink in. Paul never told them to quit drinking alcohol! This was the time to do it if he was going to. He simply told them to be wise in the use of it. True, he said weaker consciences among the immature would mean never drinking in their presence. He did however allow them to continue in the use of alcohol in the Lords Supper there. However, Paul himself indicates that he is more than happy to drink wine if those with immature and weaker consciences are not around. When in their presence I will try to not cause them to stumble ... if they are not around then I am not bound by their immature and weak conscience.

I could continue ... but the story is the same throughout.

The thing that amazes me is that there are SO INCREDIBLY MANY professing believers that are still living under a very weak and immature baby conscience. It is AMAZING to me how many people are never allowed to enjoy their God given liberties so that the immature, weak, and babyish are not offended. How in the world is it that we have so many immature baby believers that would stumble at this?!?!!? When do they ever plan to grow up?!?!?! Many of them have been, "immature baby christians with a weak conscience" for decades!!
Perhaps they do not realize they are spiritual babies and immature.

Psalm 104 puts it succinctly -

14 HE (GOD) MAKES grass grow for the cattle,
and plants for people to cultivate—
bringing forth food from the earth:
15 WINE THAT GLADDENS HUMAN HEARTS,
oil to make their faces shine,
and bread that sustains their hearts.
(CAPS mine for emphasis)

Pretty clear where wine comes from. One of the things God brings forth from the earth is wine to gladden human hearts! One translation says, "He gave wine to make glad the hearts of men".

The more mature of the faith continue to not enjoy the freedom Christ has given them to protect the baby immature weak conscienced believers. The problem with that is a great many are not actually immature believers .... they are simply religious Pharisees that have seized upon this as the topic to try and establish their works superiority upon.

 2016/2/11 15:35Profile
dolfan
Member



Joined: 2011/8/23
Posts: 1632
Alabama

 Re:

As a Bama fan, I never liked a Manning.

As a football fan, I never disliked one.

As a Christian, I pray for Peyton M. that he will know God richly, deeply and firmly rooted in Christ. My opinions of his sin notwithstanding. And I have opinions.


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Tim

 2016/2/11 15:41Profile





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