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 Re:

"For instance, I don't believe He was instructing goverments to turn the other cheek when their citizens are threatened." Chris JD

I agree, He wasn't talking to the government. Paul was pretty clear about the gov't role in protection but not so clear in our role in terms of permission to join in especially given what Christ said about how to treat enemies. Hence differing views on the subject. Wars must come, Jesus said, so that much is clear.

 2009/10/2 20:53









 Re:

Hi Old Joe. So I got it wrong again huh? Okay, we'll go ahead and leave it at that.

 2009/10/2 21:13
wind_blows
Member



Joined: 2009/1/4
Posts: 353


 Re:

Old_Joe wrote in his post:Peter fighting at that time was an attempt to prevent the sacrifice of Christ, which was not a time for war, but a time to allow peace to be made. The warfare would come later, that's why having a sword was commanded. And yet at a certain appointed time, he was to lay his life down.
++++
:-)And yet Peter did not die by the sword or in a physical battle. He died a martyr:-)

your little sis in Him
Elizabeth

 2009/10/2 21:21Profile









 Re:

Chris, you write...

I say "true believer" meaning those type of believers who are much more obviously "true" than those who are often criticized by threads on this website. In other words, I mean "true believers" who are deeply passionate and hungry to know God more...and have had a "born again" experience...and who visit this website. Now, there are many more "true believers" than those on SermonIndex (of course). However, I used the words "true believers" selectively in order to emphasize the word "true" as opposed to the rhetoric that seems to dismiss the faith of those who disagree with someone's particular ideology."

I think that explanation is above my paygrade so I cannot comment. Let me ask you a simple question, since you took such offence to me putting words in your mouth the last time. To the best of your knowledge, walk with the Lord, prayer and study of the Word, is it Okay for a Christian to go to war? Now brother, I am begging you, that would be a yes or no
:-)

You write......

"In fact, I seriously don't know what I would do if I were attacked (personally). Would I fight back...or resist in a sense to stop the man from attacking me? I can't say. I know that I didn't when I was in high school when I was being mocked for my faith. However, if I was in a position where my wife or family was in danger, I feel quite confident that I would do what I could to "resist" such an attack in order to take care of their needs."

Okay, that is plain enough and I would have to agree with you when it comes to being personally attacked or if someone broke into my house and attacked my family or if I was to witness an attack as I walked along. I do not know what I would do either but I cannot say with any certainly that I would do nothing, in fact I think the opposite. In all things we should be led by the Spirit of God. I personally think you made a very couragous stance when you were in High School, not too many could do that and of course, having read your account, a glorious end was achieved. Again, you have Mr Elliot at the bottom of your posts, and a glorious end was achieved by he and the other Martyrs.

I think what may be missing from this thread is a study of the first 250 years of Christianity. How did they react? Did they fight for their rights in the political realm? Did they , as the Zealots did, fight a terrosist war against the Romans? Did they take jobs as magistrates? And indeed, when their very existance was threatened in 70 ad, did our Christian brothers fight to the death to preserve their culture and their very country? If not, why not? Surely, after all the arguments we have heard here about self-defence, there would be no greater human cause than to fight for the very survival of your country that was being destroyed, and yet not a single mention of it. The great majority of Apostles did die in 70ad as well, but not a heroic death in defence of their women and their country, but a Martyrs death for the cause of Christ. Much is made of defendings one's wife and family, and yet Christians , by the thousands, chose to die, wives and children and all at the mouths of lions rather than go into the public square, once a year, and pronounce Caesur a God. When a Christian family was destroyed in the arena by the lions it was not always popular with the Romans. Why? Well, they would go to the center of the theatre and kneel down in a circle and pray as the lions approached. The Romans booed as they wanted to see some sport, screaming and running for their lives and so on. They did not even resist in the ring. I wonder what they would make of modern day Christians? May the Lord give us all such a Spirit. Now, what was the results of all those Martyrs? The Gospel was spread over all the world and millions found salvation in Christ........Frank

 2009/10/2 22:21
chapel
Member



Joined: 2009/4/24
Posts: 280


 Re:

Quote:
I think what may be missing from this thread is a study of the first 250 years of Christianity. How did they react? Did they fight for their rights in the political realm? Did they , as the Zealots did, fight a terrosist war against the Romans? Did they take jobs as magistrates? And indeed, when their very existance was threatened in 70 ad, did our Christian brothers fight to the death to preserve their culture and their very country? If not, why not? Surely, after all the arguments we have heard here about self-defence, there would be no greater human cause than to fight for the very survival of your country that was being destroyed, and yet not a single mention of it. The great majority of Apostles did die in 70ad as well, but not a heroic death in defence of their women and their country, but a Martyrs death for the cause of Christ. Much is made of defendings one's wife and family, and yet Christians , by the thousands, chose to die, wives and children and all at the mouths of lions rather than go into the public square, once a year, and pronounce Caesur a God. When a Christian family was destroyed in the arena by the lions it was not always popular with the Romans. Why? Well, they would go to the center of the theatre and kneel down in a circle and pray as the lions approached. The Romans booed as they wanted to see some sport, screaming and running for their lives and so on. They did not even resist in the ring. I wonder what they would make of modern day Christians? May the Lord give us all such a Spirit. Now, what was the results of all those Martyrs? The Gospel was spread over all the world and millions found salvation in Christ........Frank



Thank you Brother Frank you have raised some very good questions.

I wonder why the church today seems to so easily dismiss the examples of Christ, the disciples and the early church?

lee



Testimony of the earliest generations of Christians

Nonresistance, as discussed and taught in the earliest writings of Christians from the days of the Apostles to the Council of Nicaea in A.D. 325. This is a sampling of their consistent perspective, not an exhaustive list of references.

[In a defense to the Emperor regarding Christians:] "They comfort their oppressors and make them their friends; they do good to their enemies." - Aristides, circa AD 125, The Apology of Aristides, trans. from the Syriac, D.M. Kay / Univ. of Edinburgh; located in Ante-Nicene Fathers, Vol. 9, p. 276, Eerdman's Pub., English modernized.

"We will not ask you to punish our accusers. Their present wickedness is sufficient punishment." - Justin Martyr, c. AD 160, ANF Vol. 1, p. 165

"We used to be filled with war, mutual slaughter, and every kind of wickedness. However, now all of us have, throughout the whole earth, changed our warlike weapons. We have changed our swords into plowshares, and our spears into farming implements." - Justin Martyr, c. 160, ANF Vol. 1, p. 254

"I do not wish to be a king. I am not anxious to be rich. I decline military command." - Tatian, c. 160, ANF Vol. 2, p. 69

"We have learned not to return blow for blow, nor to go to law with those who plunder and rob us. Not only that, but to those who strike us on one side of the face, we have learned to offer the other side also." - Athenagoras, c. 175, ANF Vol. 2, p. 129

"[Jesus] commanded them ... not only not to strike others, but even, when they themselves are struck, to present the other cheek ... not only not to injure their neighbors, nor to do them any evil, but also, when they are dealt with wickedly, to be long-suffering." - Irenaeus, c. 180, ANF Vol. 1, p. 408

"The philosophers will then with propriety be taken up in a friendly exposure, ... but not in the manner of avenging ourselves on our detractors. Rather, it will be for the purpose of their conversion. For vengeance is far from being the case with those persons who have learned to bless those who curse." - Clement of Alexandria, c. 195, ANF Vol. 2, p. 347

"The spiritual man never cherishes resentment or harbors a grudge against anyone even though deserving of hatred for his conduct." - Clement of Alexandria, c. 195, ANF Vol. 2, p. 540

"Paul does not merely describe the spiritual man as being characterized by suffering wrong, rather than doing wrong. Rather, Paul teaches that a Christian does not keep count of injuries. For Paul does not allow him even to pray against the man who has done wrong to him. For he knows that the Lord expressly commanded us to pray for our enemies." - Clement of Alexandria, c. 195, ANF Vol. 2, p. 548

"Christians are not allowed to use violence to correct the delinquencies of sins." - Clement of Alexandria, c. 195, ANF Vol. 2, p. 581

"[The pagan] Hippias is put to death for laying plots against the state. No Christian ever attempted such a thing on behalf of his brethren, even when persecution was scattering them abroad with every atrocity." - Tertullian, c. 195, ANF Vol. 3, p. 51
"If dragged to trial, [the Christian] does not resist." - Tertullian, c. 197, ANF Vol. 3, p. 110

"'Nation will not take up sword against nation, and they will no more learn to fight.' Who else, therefore, does this prophecy apply to, other than us? For we are fully taught by the new law, and therefore observe these practices ... [The new law] changes the primitive ferocity of swords and lances to tranquility. It remodels the primitive execution of war upon the rivals and enemies of the Law into the peaceful actions of plowing and cultivating the land." - Tertullian, c. 197, ANF Vol. 3, p.154

"Men of old were used to requiring 'eye for eye, and tooth for tooth' and to repay evil for evil, with usury! ... But after Christ has supervened and has united the grace of faith with patience, now it is no longer lawful to attack others even with words, nor to merely say 'fool,' without danger of the judgment ... Christ says, 'Love your enemies and bless your cursers, and pray for your persecutors'"- Tertullian, c. 200, ANF Vol. 3, p. 711

"If someone attempts to provoke you by physical violence, the admonition of the Lord is at hand. He says, 'To him who strikes you on the face, turn the other cheek also.' Let outrageousness be worn out by your patience. Whatever that blow may be, joined with pain and scorn, it will receive a heavier one from the Lord." - Tertullian, c. 200, ANF Vol. 3, p. 712

"For what difference is there between provoker and provoked? The only difference is that the former was the first to do evil, while the latter did evil afterwards. Each one stands condemned in the eyes of the Lord for hurting a man. For God both prohibits and condemns every wickedness. In evil doing, there is no account taken of the order ... The commandment is absolute: evil is not to be repaid with evil." - Tertullian, c. 200, ANF Vol. 3, p. 713

"Christ plainly teaches a new kind of long-suffering, when He actually prohibits the reprisals that the Creator permitted in requiring 'an eye for an eye, and a tooth for a tooth.'" - Tertullian, c. 207, ANF Vol. 3, p. 370

"The Lord will save them in that day even His people like sheep ... No one gives the name of "sheep" to those who fall in battle with arms in hand, or those who are killed when repelling force with force. Rather, it is given only to those who are slain, yielding themselves up in their own place of duty and with patience rather than fighting in self-defense." - Tertullian, c. 207, ANF Vol. 3, p. 415

"Shall a Christian apply the chain, the prison, the torture, and the punishment, when he is not the avenger even of his own wrongs? Shall he stand guard for others more than for Christ? Shall he do it on the Lord's Day, when he does not even do it for Christ Himself? Shall he stand guard before those temples that he has renounced? Shall he take a meal where the apostle has forbidden him? ... You will see by a slight survey how many other offenses there are involved in the performances of [military] camp offices. And we must hold them to involve a transgression of God's law." - Tertullian, c. 211, ANF Vol. 3, p. 99, 100.

Celsus, the pagan critic, says, "'[Christians] also have a teaching to this effect: that we should not avenge ourselves on one who injures us.' Or, as Christ expresses it: 'Whoever will strike you on the one cheek, turn the other to him also.'" - Origen, c. 248, ANF Vol. 4, p. 634

"We slander no one, for we believe that 'revilers will not inherit the kingdom of God.' And we read, 'Bless them that curse you; bless, and curse not.' Also, 'Being reviled, we bless.'" - Origen, c. 248, ANF Vol. 4, p. 654

"Do not willingly use force and do not return force when it is used against you." - Commodianus, c. 240, ANF Vol. 4, p. 212

"When a Christian is arrested, he does not resist. Nor does he avenge himself against your unrighteous violence even though our people are numerous and plentiful." - Cyprian, c. 250, ANF Vol. 5, p. 462

"We may not hate. And we please God more by rendering no return for wrong. Therefore, we exhort you to make satisfaction to God. Do this while you have the power, while there yet remains in you something of life ... We do not envy your comforts, nor do we conceal the divine benefits. We repay kindness for your hatred. In return for the torments and penalties that are inflicted on us, we point out to you the ways of salvation." - Cyprian, c. 250, ANF Vol. 5, p. 465

"The Christian has departed from rage and carnal contention as if from the hurricanes of the sea. He has already begun to be tranquil and meek in the harbor of Christ. Therefore, he should allow neither anger nor discord within his breath. For he must neither return evil for evil, nor bear hatred." - Cyprian, c. 250, ANF Vol. 5, p. 488

"Do no one any injury at any time; provoke no one to anger. If an injury is done to you, look to Jesus Christ. And even as you desire Him to forgive your transgressions, also forgive others theirs." - Theonas of Alexandria, c. 300, ANF Vol. 6, p. 161

"Does Venus Militaris also preside over the wickedness of [military] camps and the debaucheries of young men?" - Arnobius, c. 305, ANF Vol. 6, p. 478

"[True] religion is to be defended, not by putting to death, but by dying. Not by cruelty, but by patient endurance. Not by guilt, but by good faith. For the former belongs to evil, but the latter to the good ... For if you wish to defend religion by bloodshed, tortures, and guilt, it will no longer be defended. Rather, it will be polluted and profaned ... And, therefore, when we suffer such impious things, we do not resist even in word. Rather, we leave vengeance to God. We do not act as those persons who would have it appear that they are defenders of their gods, who rage without restraint against those who do not worship them ... What if [a man] rushes wherever injustice will call him? Such a man does not fulfill the duty of virtue. For he who tries to return an injury desires to imitate that very person by whom he has been injured. In short, he who imitates a bad man cannot be good." - Lactantius, c. 304-313, ANF Vol. 7, cf. pp. 157-160, 182-185


_________________
Lee Chapel

 2009/10/2 23:23Profile









 Re:

Thank you again for this thread.

We don't realize that you and those who came before you are preparing us for what may in actuality come to this nation in our life-time.

If we don't prepare our hearts Now, while we still have a chance, we'll be facing the unthinkable.

I believe many here do not realize how many websites and forums are out there that are cleaning their guns and speaking openly of fighting back now.

I'm not a "traitor" to this nation nor to Israel but I've been called this, because I do not see taking up arms against the Government - even if they did hire foreign troops to help them.

I shouldn't have to post the URLs for all of the "Christian" sites and will not - but you decide for yourself if this is "Christian" or not.

IF foreign or domestic troops or any law-enforcement agency man-handles your wife or seperates you from your family or them from you - what are you going to do?

Dear GOD I'm so grateful for those who have prepared my heart for persecution or anything remotely like it. Amen!

 2009/10/3 0:00
ccchhhrrriiisss
Member



Joined: 2003/11/23
Posts: 4499


 Re:

Hi appolus...

Quote:
I think that explanation is above my paygrade so I cannot comment. Let me ask you a simple question, since you took such offence to me putting words in your mouth the last time. To the best of your knowledge, walk with the Lord, prayer and study of the Word, is it Okay for a Christian to go to war? Now brother, I am begging you, that would be a yes or no

Brother, I wasn't "offended" by the words that you seemed to place in my mouth ("[i]concerned[/i]" might be a better word). As I said before, I am not trying to convince anyone to see things the way that I do (or think that I do). Thus, my opinion about this matter isn't important enough to be begged for. I thought that I had stated my "position" about this matter plain enough. Since this wasn't clear enough: To the "best of my knowledge, walk with the Lord, prayer and study of the Word," I do not see anything in the Word of God that specifically PROHIBITS a Christian from serving in the military, defending the weak, or defending a family member.

Regardless of the difference in perspective that some of us might have, I am even more concerned with the rhetoric of some that would seemingly dismiss the faith of those with whom they disagree. I pointed out those specific words earlier. That is what I am more concerned about.

Quote:

I think what may be missing from this thread is a study of the first 250 years of Christianity. How did they react? Did they fight for their rights in the political realm? Did they , as the Zealots did, fight a terrosist war against the Romans? Did they take jobs as magistrates? And indeed, when their very existance was threatened in 70 ad, did our Christian brothers fight to the death to preserve their culture and their very country? If not, why not? Surely, after all the arguments we have heard here about self-defence, there would be no greater human cause than to fight for the very survival of your country that was being destroyed, and yet not a single mention of it.


I disagree. The amount of historical literature of the early church is vastly limited. The early church didn't write many "chronicles" of the early believers. There are plenty of things that we do NOT know...simply due to the lack of written evidence. We don't know to what extent they involved themselves in the "affairs of this world" (I Corinthians 7). We are left mostly with what is found in the Word of God, and such instruction from the Word is the only [u]perfect[/u] example anyway. In fact, the Church already had problems within the first 50 years of its existence -- which is detailed in Paul's and Peter's epistles. Yet, we know that Cornelius was both a believer AND a centurion. We know that the "persistent widow" petitioned an unrighteous judge to move on her behalf. We know that Paul invoked his Roman citizenship and used the Roman legal system as a catalyst to take the Gospel to Caesar and Rome. We know that the Scriptures instruct believers to submit unto authorities (including kings and governors) and to even honor earthly kings (I Peter 2:13-17). In addition, the Scriptures warn those who would subvert authority and speak against it (Romans 13:1-7). I think that ChrisJD pointed out that there are other forms of resistance -- like harmful rhetoric -- that can be just as injurious as physical force.
Quote:

The great majority of Apostles did die in 70ad as well, but not a heroic death in defence of their women and their country, but a Martyrs death for the cause of Christ. Much is made of defendings one's wife and family, and yet Christians , by the thousands, chose to die, wives and children and all at the mouths of lions rather than go into the public square, once a year, and pronounce Caesur a God.


Again, we are limited by the very little that is actually written about the life and times of the Early Church. Some may very well have refused to be released and face such a death or violence at the hands of persecutors. Yet we do not have the full record of every believer in the first 250 years of Church history.

Regardless, this is NOT what we are talking about here. I have already agreed that there might be some credibility to the argument that one might refuse resisting persecution personally for the Gospel's sake. Yet defending my wife or family, in most circumstances, is a different matter altogether. In addition, refusing to "resist" (either by physical or rhetorical methods) for the sake of the Gospel is different than required or optional service in the military.
Quote:
I wonder what they would make of modern day Christians? May the Lord give us all such a Spirit. Now, what was the results of all those Martyrs? The Gospel was spread over all the world and millions found salvation in Christ.


Of course, we could ask the same about them. Not everyone in the early Church was perfect -- given the vast amount of reproof that makes up quite a bit of the epistles and the 2nd and 3rd chapters of Revelation. I haven't read many firsthand accounts of believers who silently went to the arenas to be fed to the lions or become targets for gladiators. I have read secondhand accounts that were written many, many years later (such as [i]Foxe's Book of Martyrs[/i] -- written more than 1500 years after the birth of the Church). Of course, this doesn't include the accounts of anyone who might have fled from persecution. In fact, Paul (when he was Saul) fled from persecution when he was let down through the city gates shortly after his conversion (Acts 9:25). While the stories of the early martyrs were great and faithful examples of many in the Early Church, the Gospel was spread by those who had NOT yet died.

I think that this is where the position of those of us who are not of the "non-resistant" movement is often misunderstood. I don't know any true believer who would be unwilling to die for the cause of Christ. I don't know any true believer who wouldn't be willing to lay down his life for the sake of the Gospel. I also don't know any true believers who are bloodthirsty men who are hoping to one day respond in violence. I have known many soldiers, and none of them ever told me that they looked forward to ending the life of another human being. One of my sisters' husband is a police detective. He prays every night that he doesn't have to hurt anyone in the line of duty. At the same time, I feel that it might be a duty for a believer to take up the cause of the needy, the weak, or in the protection of his family.

In fact, Jesus said, "[i]Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends[/i]" (John 15:13). I believe that I could just as readily defend my wife from a violent rapist as I would defend her from an attacking mountain lion. I believe that I could do this with a clear conscience. In addition, I still do not see anything in the Scriptures that would prohibit me from serving in the military of the nation that God has placed me. No person in the Old Testament was tried by the Law of Moses for killing while serving in military or defending their family (even though the Commandment says [i]Thou shalt not kill[/i]). It is because there were certain exceptions to the rule -- which was due to one precept that superseded the other. One might even point to the spanking of children (which [u]is[/u] a form of violence) as a Scriptural embrace of physical "resistance" that defiese "[i]turn the other cheek[/i]" because it is superseded by a greater command to instruct our children in the way that they should go.

Again, this is all beside the point. The underlying point that I have been trying to make is not to persuade anyone to see things the way that I might see them. Rather, I would caution anyone from dismissing the faith of those who do not adhere to all of the tenants of "non-resistance" ideology. Many of us are also true believers who walk with a clear conscience before God. Some of the wording expressed about those of us who might disagree with certain particular teachings of "non-resistance" appears to be just a bit condescending. We are treated (and even talked about) as if we are ignoring the Scriptures or the examples of the early Church. We are not. Many of us have prayed about this issue and studied it with sincerity and integrity before the Lord. While our conclusions might differ, I feel that it is unwise to resort to pretentious rhetoric regarding those with whom we merely disagree.

We can certainly agree to disagree. However, we need to continually treat the brethren with fraternal hospitality and unequivocal love as if they too are fellow members of the family of God. It is not my intention to persuade. I can merely share what I feel the Lord has led me in regard to this topic. However, I do feel that I should caution anyone from "talking down" to those of us who might not agree in regard to this topic. Of course, this goes both ways. We should not treat others like they are "lesser brethren" simply because they do not agree with what we think the Lord (or the Word) has shown us. I feel that some of the comments have been pointedly pernicious toward those of us who believe in limited forms of involvement or "resistance."


_________________
Christopher

 2009/10/3 1:30Profile
ChrisJD
Member



Joined: 2006/2/11
Posts: 2895
Philadelphia PA

 Re:

Hi again everyone.



"The amount of historical literature of the early church is vastly limited. The early church didn't write many "chronicles" of the early believers."


This was my impression also but my knowledge of Christian History is limited.

I didn't see much of anything in the qoutes that were provided that spoke directly to their attitude about serving in goverments or in wars. I might have missed it though as I did not examine each one thouroughly. It looked as though they were all from about 150 AD and later also.



_________________
Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2009/10/3 9:24Profile
ChrisJD
Member



Joined: 2006/2/11
Posts: 2895
Philadelphia PA

 Re:

Appolus brought up a good point:


"I think what may be missing from this thread is a study of the first 250 years of Christianity. How did they react? Did they fight for their rights in the political realm? Did they , as the Zealots did, fight a terrosist war against the Romans?"



But one that I think is limited in how far it may serve us today.


The Rome of the early Church is not the Britain or America of the 1600's and onward. While there may be some similarities, I believe there are profound differences. Christians in those countries are not having to refuse to go into the public square to offer a pinch of incense to Caesar because Caesar does not exist there and they are not facing death by lions in the arena because it does not exist there either. A closer example might be North Korea. And I wouldn't be surprised if the beleivers there live much like those of the most ancient churchs.


But we cannot fully follow the example of the early Church by trying to imitate what they did in the first century anymore than we can follow God or Christ by going to Jerusalem and trying to retrace the steps of Christ. Becuase the first century is gone. And the Jerusalem of the time of Christ is gone also.


The stage of the world has been moved and changed times and times again since then. The actors and the props from that time in history have come and gone as well as others since them.

While there is nothing new under the sun and what has been will be again, I do not beleive that means that there are not times and events and circumstances unique to every generation.

The Gospel came forth in the fulness of time, when Rome ruled the World. That is much different than say, when someone like William Penn founded the province of Pennsylvania.


A much different place than Rome. A much differnt man than Caesar.


_________________
Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2009/10/3 9:53Profile
ChrisJD
Member



Joined: 2006/2/11
Posts: 2895
Philadelphia PA

 Re:

Quote:
Now, what was the results of all those Martyrs?





In the forward to the book [i]Tortured for Christ[/i], the director of Voice of The Martyrs, Tom White writes:



Many today believe that a martyr is simply someone who dies for his faith. Unfortunately, by this definition we have lost the true significance and depth of martyrdom. St. Augustine once stated, “The cause, not the suffering, makes a genuine mar­tyr.” In his play Murder in the Cathedral, T. S. Eliot describes a martyr as one “who has become an instrument of God, who has lost his will in the will of God, not lost it but found it, for he has found freedom in submission to God. The martyr no longer desires anything for himself, not even the glory of ­martyrdom.”



In chapter one of the book, under a section titled [b]Working Undercover[/b] Pastor Wurbrand descirbes how one Christian Doctor played a part in his release:


When I was kidnapped by police and kept imprisoned for years in strictest secrecy, a Christian doctor actually became a member of the secret police to learn my whereabouts! As a secret police doctor, he had access to the cells of all prisoners and hoped to find me. All of his friends shunned him, thinking he had become a Communist. To go around dressed in the uniform of the torturers is a much greater sacrifice than to wear the uniform of a prisoner.

The doctor found me in a deep, dark cell and sent word that I was alive. He was the first friend to discover me during my initial eight-and-a-half years in prison! Due to him, word was spread that I was alive and, when prisoners were released during the Eisenhower-Khrushchev “thaw” in 1956, Christians clamored for my release and I was freed for a short time. If it had not been for this doctor, who joined the secret police spe­cif­ically to find me, I would never have been released. I would still be in prison—or in a grave—today.




If we may reflect on the significance of the lives and sacrifices of those who have given all at the hands of the governments of this world, we might also reflect on the sacrifices of those who have given all, within them, for the cause of Christ, or for righteousness in general.


We might think of someone like William Wilberforce and how he labored to end slavery in Great Britain.

We might also wonder too, what effect men and women might still have upon the governments of the free-world, if, in a clear conscience before God, they sacrficed even their political futures, in order to stand for Christ and for righteousness.



_________________
Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2009/10/3 10:36Profile





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