SermonIndex Audio Sermons
Image Map
Discussion Forum : General Topics : The decline of Secular AND Christian music

Print Thread (PDF)

Goto page ( Previous Page 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 Next Page )
PosterThread









 Re:

Quote:

KrispyKrittr wrote:
Quote:
Hey, knowing Krispy, he's going to have quite alot to say about this too! I sure am looking forward to his thoughts! I think it was Ormly's Hallo-weenie roast post that inspired me.



Yea... this thread has been successfully hi-jacked! Chase that rabbit, boys!! :-o

Krispy



Hijacked? I wondered about that when I posted.

Think for a moment though how much overlaps to include other areas perhaps now recognisable at first, that is until things start to happen we begin to sense as a hijacking of our allegiance. Very subtle, this person Satan who uses our friendship[s] with the world to undermine our striving in the perfect way.

:-(

 2006/11/6 9:23









 Re:

Quote:

roadsign wrote:
Ormly, the five Chapters aught to supplement the four spiritual laws! It sure gets one thinking. Does this come in pamphlet form?



I heard that read aloud by David Jeremiah years ago and copied it down. I have no idea where it originated.

Quote:
but it’s not MY fault!” …. [to]……… “it’s my fault


Quote:
In other words, repentance begins when the victim assumes responsibility.



Can it be otherwise if it is to be a beginning of true repentence?

Quote:
Now if Satan can disguise the hole in the ground, hmmm, I wonder, the music?

Quote:
I might add that any kind of music can become a tool of Satan – a temptation that keeps life in the hole more bearable. That could include (yes) even our beloved hymns, or whatever we cherish so dearly. The love of music can subtly replace the love of God.



I believe it is called "sentementalism". Some hymns need to be shelved for sure. However, some need to sung at every church gathering. I believe we know which they are if we are worshippers.
Quote:
Thankfully, God implements ways of testing our loves, and ingeniously exposes our rival loves – be it money or music. Guess how I know?

It's not our job as music providers in church to use music simply to enhance the hole-life.

Diane



I believe it was David who sent out the praisers and singers before his army. I feel quite sure his music was conducive to supplication and thus, victory.

Indeed. As one who grew up singing
"specials" on Sunday nights, I became increasingly disenchanted even with myself with "specials" as an influence. I am not moved at all by "specials". Specials are entertainment.

The congregation should be the choir. In our church, it was because, for one reason, we never had a platform big enough to stand one. #2. We didn't need one. Our congregation was always ready. On a hot summer night with the windows open, the whole neighborhood knew we were worshippers.... and it went on for hours. Many people came to the knowledge of Christ.



:-D

 2006/11/6 10:01
Logic
Member



Joined: 2005/7/17
Posts: 1791


 Re: The decline of Secular AND Christian music

Quote:

KrispyKrittr wrote:
"Art" no longer requires transcendent and inspired human skills to produce.....


I heard that a janitor actually threw away a peace of "art" thinking that it was garbage, for there was no difference between the "art and what his job was to clean up.

Music on the other hand, I can not tell the difference between one song and the next played on the radio. Musicians are a dime a dozen these days. Especialy on an album, where does one song end and another begin? I find there is no diversity.

 2006/11/6 11:07Profile









 Re:

Quote:
Music on the other hand, I can not tell the difference between one song and the next played on the radio. Musicians are a dime a dozen these days. Especialy on an album, where does one song end and another begin? I find there is no diversity.



Ahhh!! Someone finally brought the thread around full circle! THIS is what the topic was [i]supposed[/i] to be...

Krispy

 2006/11/6 14:53
Compton
Member



Joined: 2005/2/24
Posts: 2732


 Re:

For the record, I did try to share some modern music I thought was worth listening to...but I didn't get any takers...


That's cool... I guess. >sniff<

MC


_________________
Mike Compton

 2006/11/6 16:38Profile









 Re:

MC... I must've missed that. Share with me, my friend!

Krispy

 2006/11/6 16:41
PTywama3
Member



Joined: 2005/3/1
Posts: 156
Tacoma, WA

 Re:

I must just buy good albums, I really don't have that problem.

Maybe I'm just a radical thinker, but people have been saying this for generations, and they're ultimately correct. The style of a time is fairly consistent with itself more often than not. There will be a few standouts, but generally speaking the thing we find ourselves attracted to is the artist (be it Louie Armstrong, the London Symphony Orchestra, or Toby Keith). The level of musicianship as a whole might have dropped, but there are solid players and singers out there right now.

Really the argument is we're bored, or its we miss the old styles being prominent. Oddly enough, I can pick up jazz, classical, country, pop, rock, alternative, gospel & religious, and mixtures just by pressing the over button on my radio.

I can distinguish between orchestras playing the same piece the way I can distinguish between jazz or big bands playing the same piece. I can distinguish between pieces because I actively listen to music. The same holds true for this "cookie cutter" music of today... in all reality it is just as often personal taste and the decline of music happened back when the radio was still more popular than TV as personal entertainment. The British Invasion should show us that.

Every once in a while, there do pop up some truly original bands that bend their genre and totally change the way we expect music to be... But the funny thing is that excellence breeds excellence only for so long, and we cannot expect such groundbreaking things to happen every decade. America has helped change it from hoping to occur once over several generations to possibly once or twice a lifetime.

Now a lot of that originality a lot of us reminisce over is gone. Things feel stale, and we don't like it. But that's the way history goes, and there's no way around it. It doesn't mean its all bad music. I think it means a lot of us have become discriminative against music rather than of it. And that may not be fair.


_________________
David Reynolds

 2006/11/6 17:16Profile









 Re:

Along those lines... consider this... and I'm going to use secular musicians for my example because most will know who I am talking about...

Banarama... remember them? What did they have? One hit in the mid-80's... Never to be heard from again.

Eric Clapton... been around for 4 decades.

Need I say more?

Krispy

 2006/11/6 17:20
Compton
Member



Joined: 2005/2/24
Posts: 2732


 Re:

Okay! :-D

Here is a replay of the links of music that I thought could be considered an exception to the rule. Like I mentioned earlier , that although these are "sacred" composers, they aren't "evangelical" at all. I included them on their artistic merits rather then their theology. Most of them use scripture as text anyways...maybe evangelicals should do that more too.


The British composer and choral conductor [url=http://www.amazon.com/Rutter-Requiem-Susan-Dorey/dp/B00008OP1S/sr=1-5/qid=1162453899/ref=sr_1_5/102-1179971-3725766?ie=UTF8&s=music]John Rutter[/url] is being heard more and more these days. His Requiem is my favorite...one listen to Pie Jesus on this inexpensive CD and you'll believe that deeply moving and beautiful worship music isn't a thing of the past afterall.

The American composer [url=http://www.amazon.com/Lauridsen-Northwest-Journey-Morten/dp/B00004YNF7/sr=1-7/qid=1162454158/ref=sr_1_7/102-1179971-3725766?ie=UTF8&s=music]Morten Lauridsen[/url] writes both sacred and secular choral music. If you want to hear one of the most heart stirring flowing melodies that could ever fall on your ears, listen to 'O Magnum Mysterium" on the CD I bookmarked. Ears are wonderful gifts from God!

Henryk Gorecki is a Polish composer who has found some measure of popular acceptance even though his music is known as an expression of his country's misery in the 20th century. The first movement from [url=http://www.amazon.com/Henryk-Gorecki-Symphony-Sorrowful-Songs/dp/B000005J1C/ref=cm_sylt_fullview_prod_37/103-6582526-8001432/103-6582526-8001432]Symphony 3 "Sorrowful Songs"[/url] has no words, but is one of the most prayer-like intonation of sadness and hope I have ever heard. Great soundtrack for reading the Psalms or Lamentations...

Perhaps the most different composer in my line-up is Estonian orthodox composer [url=http://www.amazon.com/Best-Arvo-Part/dp/B0001ZMBU6/sr=8-3/qid=1162453585/ref=pd_bbs_sr_3/102-1179971-3725766?ie=UTF8&s=music]Arvo Part[/url]. He is an internationally recognized chuch music composer who has become known for meditative minimalism. It's worth noting that he suffered severe censorship from the Soviet Union a few decades ago when he made his Christian faith public.

And I also mentioned this guy, not so much for his art but for his uniqueness...

[url=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000AA3SAE/ref=ed_mus_6x_matis]Matisyahu[/url] is contemporary but not exactly Christian...He's Hasidic Jewish! Normally I wouldn't be that drawn to Hassidic Hip Hop Reggae :-) but I found his Talmudic infused music very endearing.

There is something touching about hearing this guy sing Jerusalem, if I forget about you, let my right hand forget what it's supposed to do.

File under 'culturally interesting."

MC

PS... also gave Michael card an honorable mention....



_________________
Mike Compton

 2006/11/6 17:33Profile









 Re:

Quote:
The level of musicianship as a whole might have dropped, but there are solid players and singers out there right now.



Rule of thumb: Lousy music played by solid players is still lousy music. Can I be wrong about that?

:-?

 2006/11/6 18:45





©2002-2019 SermonIndex.net
Promoting Genuine Biblical Revival.
Privacy Policy