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Discussion Forum : Articles and Sermons : Jonathan Edwards - Undiscerned Spiritual Pride

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crsschk
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Santa Clara, CA

 Re: Pride and Humility

[b]Thoughts on Pride from the book of Proverbs Part 3[/b]

[i]Charles Bridges[/i]

[i]Prov 11:2. When pride cometh, then cometh shame: but with the lowly is wisdom.[/i]

Pride was the principle of the fall (Gen 3: 5), and therefore the native principle of fallen man (Mark 7:22). When pride had stripped us of our honour, then-not till then-[i]cometh shame[/i] (Gen 3:7, with 2:26). This is the wise discipline of our God to scourge the one by the other. The Babel-builders (Gen 11:4); Miriam (Num 12:2,10); Uzziah (2 Chron 26:16-21); Haman (Esth 5:1, 7:10); Nebuchadnezzar (Dan 4:29-32); Herod (Acts 12:22,23); all are instances of [i]shame[/i], treading upon the heels of pride. Even in common life, a man will never attempt to raise himself above his own level- but [i]then cometh shame[/i]. (Luke 14:11)the most revolting recompense. And thus our God puts to shame the man, who knows not his bounds, and who refuses to stand on the low ground, on which he has placed him. "Every one that exalteth himself shall be abased" (Luke 18:14; Isa 2:17).

Such is the folly of [i]pride. With the lowly is wisdom.[/i] What a splendour of [i]wisdom[/i] shone in the lowly child, "sitting at the doctors' feet, astonishing them at his understanding and his answers!" (Luke 2:47). And will not this spirit be to us the path of wisdom? For the Divine Teacher "reveals to the babes, what he hides from the wise and prudent" (Ib. 10:21). There is no greater proof of proud folly, than believing only what we understand. Faith is thus grounded on knowledge, not on testimony: as if the word of God could not be implicitly received, except as corroborated by other witnesses. Happy is that [i]lowliness[/i] of spirit, that comes to God's revelation, as it were without any will or mind of our own; humbly receiving what he is pleased to give; but willing-yea-thankful-to be ignorant, when he forbids us to intrude! (Col 2:18). [i]Prov 16:33b and before honour is humility.[/i] Most wise therefore is our Father's discipline-[i]Humility before honour.[/i] Indeed, without [i]humility, honour[/i] would be our temptation, rather than our glory. Had not the Apostle been kept down by a most humbling trial, his [i]honour[/i] would have been his ruin (2 Cor 12:7-9). The exaltation of the Lord's people in Providence, is therefore often conducted through the valley of [i]Humiliations[/i]. Joseph was raised from the prison to the throne. Moses and David were taken from the Shepherd's fold to feed the Lord's inheritance. Gideon acknowledged himself to be of "the least of the families of Israel." Ruth was humbled by adversity, ere she was raised to the high [i]hounour[/i] of a Mother in Israel, and progenitor of the Saviour. Abigail confessed herself unworthy to wash the feet of her lord's servants, before she was honoured to be his wife. And in the daily walk of life, the lowest place is the path-way to [i]honour[/i].

The same principle obtains in the dispensations of grace. "He that humbleth himself shall be exalted in due time." Not that in the forgetfulness of our high privileges and confidence, we are to be weighed down in a sense of degradation. The true humility, which realizes our vileness, casts us most simply upon the full resources of the gospel, so that the most humble is the most triumphant believer. 'The lower then any descend in humiliation, the higher they shall ascend in exaltation. The lower this foundation of [i]humility is[/i] laid, the higher shall the roof of [i]honour[/i] be over-laid.'

And was not this the track of our beloved Lord-[i]Before honour, humility[/i]-the cross before the crown? How deep was that descent, by which he, who was infinitely more than man, became "a worm and no man!" (Psa 22:6). And yet [i]the honour[/i], which rewarded this humility, what tongue can tell! (Phil 2:9). 'We must not disdain to follow Jesus Christ.' Is it a light privilege to follow in the pathway consecrated by his steps, irradiated by his smile? (Matt 11:29; 20:28; John 13:14).

[i]Prov 16:18, 19 Pride goeth before destruction, and a haughty spirit before a fall. Better is it to be of an humble spirit with the lowly, than to divide the spoil with the proud.[/i]

What more vivid exposition of these Proverbs is needed, than our own ruined condition? Our father's [i]pride[/i], desiring to "be as God," hurried his whole race to [i]destruction[/i]. 'O Adam'-was the exclamation of a man of God, 'what hast thou done!' 'I think,'-said another holy man-'so far as any man is proud, he is kin to the devil, and a stranger to God and to himself.' The most awful strength of Divine eloquence seems to be concentrated to delineate the character and ruin of pride. Example abounds throughout the Scripture; each sounding this solemn admonition-"Be not high-minded, but fear." Fearful indeed is our danger, if the caution be not welcomed; if the need for it be not deeply felt!

[i]The haughty spirit[/i] carries the head high. The man looks upward, instead of to his steps. What wonder therefore, if, not seeing what is before him, he [i]falls?[/i] He loves to climb. The enemy is always at hand to assist him (Matt 4:5, 6); and the greater the height, the more dreadful the fall. There is often something in the [i]fall,[/i] that marks the Lord's special judgment. God smites the object, of which the man is proud. David gloried in the number of his people, and the Lord diminished them by pestilence. Hezekiah boasted of his treasure, and the Lord marked it to be taken away. At the moment that Nebuchadnezzar was proud of his Babel, he was banished from the enjoyment of it. "The vain daughters of Zion," priding themselves on their ornaments, were covered with disgrace (Isa 3:24). Yet after all, the state of heart that prepares man for [i]the fall'[/i] is the worst part of his condition. For what is our pride is our danger, 'Why'-a wise man asks-'is earth and ashes proud? Pride was not made for man.'

But have we been preserved from open disgrace? Examine secret faults. Trace them to their source-a subtle confidence in gifts, attainments, and privileges. And then praise thy God for his painful discipline-the preserving mercy from ruinous self-exaltation. Truly the way down to the valley of Humiliation is deep and rugged. Humility, therefore, is the grand preserving grace. The contrite publican was safe, when the boasting Pharisee was confounded (Luke 18:14). [i]Better[/i] then-more happy, more honourable, more acceptable to God and man-is [i]a humble spirit,[/i] companying [i]with the lowly, than the spoil[/i] of the haughty conqueror, ministering only to his [i]destruction[/i] (James 1:9). Better is an humble spirit, than a high condition; to have our temper brought down, than our outward condition raised. But who believes this? Most men strive to rise; few desire to lie low! May thy example-blessed Saviour-keep me low! 'When Majesty'-said pious Bernard-'humbled himself, shall the worm swell with pride?'


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Mike Balog

 2007/1/13 18:52Profile
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 Re: Pride and Humility

[b]Pride and Its Cure[/b]

[i]This Article was taken from the Booklet "The Sin of Pride" Chapter 4 by L.R. Shelton, Jr. to point unto the Lord Jesus Christ and His shed blood as our only ground of cleansing from the sin of Pride or any other sin.[/i]

God's eternal Word is forever settled in heaven, because it was written in heaven "and is given unto us by inspiration of God and is profitable for doctrine, for reproof, for correction, for instruction in righteousness: that the man of God may be perfect, throughly furnished unto all good works" (2 Tim 3:16-17). The Word of God is a sword to cut and to heal us; it is bread to feed us; it is water to quench our thirst; it is a fire to burn its way into the deepest recesses of our hearts; it is a lamp to lighten our pathways; it is a rod to chasten us; it is a staff to lead us; it is life to quicken us and make us alive; it is the power of God in the hands of the Holy Spirit to save us, cleanse us, deliver us, and make us suitable for the inheritance of the saints, and all of this by the saving faith in Christ that is worked in us by hearing the Word of God. For we are told: "Faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the Word of God" (Rom 10:17).

Yes, the Word of God warns us, counsels us, guides us, leads us, and points us to the Lamb of God, Who takes away our sins by the shedding of His own precious blood. The Word of God also reveals unto us the gracious invitation of our Saviour God to come to Him and find rest, peace, forgiveness and deliverance from sin, especially this sin of [b]pride[/b].

We have shown you from the Word of God that the God of the Bible hates sin, especially this sin of pride, because it robs Him of His glory. But, if we are willing to confess the sin of pride and forsake it, He will have mercy upon us-Proverbs 28:13: "He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy." Alright, there it is! To the Law and to the Testimony we must go, paying special attention now to the many gracious invitations that God gives to poor, needy sinners. It is written, as it were, in bold letters on the pages of Holy Writ: COME, AND WELCOME TO JESUS CHRIST.

Oh, how my poor soul rejoices in such an invitation: COME AND WELCOME TO JESUS CHRIST. Come and welcome to the only One who can deliver us from sin, this sin of [b]pride[/b] and its deserved damnation; come and welcome to the only One who can save us from the wrath of God; come and welcome to the only One who was lifted up for our transgressions and raised for our justification; come and welcome to the only One who can be touched with the feeling of our infirmities; come and welcome to the only One who can bring us back to God; come and welcome to the only One who can bring us to heaven; come and welcome to the only One who is rich in mercy, grace and love; come and welcome to the only One who has gone to prepare a place of rest and peace for us in His Father's home; come and welcome, I say, to the One who opened the fountain of cleansing by the shedding of His precious blood for sin and for uncleanness. I say again: Come and welcome to Jesus Christ.

What a mercy is this then, that is bestowed upon poor sinners: to be invited to come to the feast made ready by the Master Himself. You might ask the question: To whom then is this invitation of mercy given? Matthew 11:28 has our Lord saying, "Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest." Yes, it is given to those who have laboured long and hard to save themselves by the works of their own hands, and are no closer to God than when they started, but are in fact laden down with a heavy burden of sin. Our Lord says: Come and welcome to Me, come lay down your burden of sin upon Me, and I will give you rest.

I tell you from a heart of personal experience today that there is no rest like the rest of the sin-weary soul upon the bosom of Christ by faith. I don't know of another soul living that tried to work his way into the good graces of God as I did. But to quit my work and rest in Christ as my all in all was indeed a great mercy. How can anyone possibly live in confusion and strife, in the arguing of their heart and in the awful accusing conscience without Christ to bear their sin-burden. I can't live without Him.

Again, Luke 14:17 has our Lord saying: "Come; for all things are now ready." What is ready for those who are invited to come?

(1) Salvation from sin is ready; for Christ Himself finished the work of redemption on the cross and proved its accomplishment by rising from the dead and leaving our sins in the grave.

(2) The Father who planned our salvation is ready to receive us in Christ, because He has let the Lord Jesus back into His presence as our Representative. No sin was upon Him when He returned to glory as our High Priest; all our sins had been left in the tomb, therefore the Father received Him and set Him above all principalities and powers.

(3) The riches of His grace and mercy are ready; His white robe of righteousness is ready; His eyesalve to put upon our blinded eyes is ready: "I counsel thee to buy of me gold tried in the fire, that thou mayest be rich; and white raiment, that thou mayest be clothed, and that the shame of thy nakedness do not appear; and anoint thine eyes with eyesalve, that thou mayest see" (Rev 3:18).

(4) All power is ready to save, deliver and keep each poor soul that comes to Christ, for our Lord tells us in Matthew 28:18: "All power is given unto Me in heaven and in earth." Also in John 17:2 He says He has power over all flesh. Therefore, John 6:37: "Him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast out." Yes, He has power to save and to keep, and will not cast us out, for He Himself said in John 10:27-28: "My sheep hear my voice, and I know them and they follow me: and I give unto them eternal life; and they shall never perish, neither shall any man pluck them out of my hand." Yes, all things are ready; so come and welcome to Jesus Christ.

Again, Isaiah 55:1: "Ho, every one that thirsteth, come ye to the waters, and he that hath no money: come ye, buy, and eat; yea, come, buy wine and milk without money and without price." What a gracious invitation is this! We are welcome to Jesus Christ as poor bankrupt paupers. Oh praise the Lord, that fits my case, for that is all that I am: a poor, worthless, penniless pauper. But did you know, my friend, that this is the one to whom the invitation is given? No money-yet come and buy, for God freely gives us all things in Christ. The question is asked: What are all these things? I will answer, He freely pardons us for Christ's sake. He freely forgives us of all our sins for Christ's sake; He blots them out as a thick cloud never to be remembered against us anymore.

[i]This then is a most blessed invitation, for it invites both the thirsty and the hungry, both the cursed of God and the devil's castaways to come and welcome to Jesus Christ, the friend of sinners.[/i]

Again, Isaiah 1:18 has our blessed Savior God saying: "Come now, and let us reason together, saith the LORD: though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow: though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool." Think of this! Ponder this! Meditate on this! The Lord of glory inviting poor sinners to come and reason with Him about their eternal soul. He invites you who are sin-sick, sin-laden, sin-convicted and convinced, to come and reason with Him and to know that every sin you confess to be scarlet, every sin you confess to be red like crimson, He will forgive and cleanse by His own precious blood as you look to Him by faith. What a word! What an invitation! What a blessing! What a salvation! What a Saviour is given to us in the Gospel!

[i]You might say: But I am a great sinner. But Jesus Christ says: Come and welcome, I died for great sinners. You might say: But I am an old sinner having lived all my life in sin. But Jesus Christ says: Come and welcome, I died for old sinners, black and dirty as they are. You might say: But I am a hard-hearted sinner, I have a heart of stone on which nothing makes an impression. But Jesus Christ says: Come and welcome, I died for hard-hearted sinners, I give them new hearts. You might say: But I have served sin and Satan all my days. But Jesus Christ says: Come and welcome, for I died to deliver you from the clutches of sin and Satan. Yes, our Lord said it is written of Him: "Thou shalt call his name JESUS for he shall save [or deliver] his people from their sins."[/i]

You might say: But I have sinned against light and knowledge. But Jesus Christ says: Come and welcome, I died for sinners like you. You might say: But I have sinned against mercy and the prayers of father, mother, brothers, sisters and wife; and even the prayers of all of God's people. But Jesus Christ, the eternal Son of God says: Come and welcome, for I died for the ungodly sinner like you. You might say: But I have no good thing to bring with me, I have nothing but sin, a wasted life, a proud and rebellious heart. But, dear friend, our Lord says: Come and welcome to Jesus Christ, for He alone can put away your sins by the sacrifice of Himself.

If you indeed hate sin, mourn over sin-for it has been against God-if you are willing to confess your sins and forsake them, then indeed God says He will put them out of His sight. Come and welcome to Jesus Christ, for in Him alone is found deliverance from the power, penalty and presence of sin.

At times my soul seems not to be able to contain itself as I understand that my Blessed Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ still invites me to come to Him. As I Peter 2:4 puts it: "To whom coming"-always coming-for He is still my Lord and Saviour. He is still my Refuge from each storm, my Hiding Place in every fear and in every battle. He allows me, by His grace, to keep coming to Him day by day and hour by hour to find in Him my all in all. I need a Saviour just as much today as I did the day I first came to Him as a poor, hell-deserving sinner.

"But what saith it? The word is nigh thee, even in thy mouth, and in thy heart: that is, the word of faith, which we preach; That if thou shalt confess with thy mouth the Lord Jesus, and shalt believe in thine heart that God hath raised him from the dead, thou shalt be saved. For with the heart man believeth unto righteousness; and with the mouth confession is made unto salvation. For the scripture saith, Whosoever believeth on him shall not be ashamed. For there is no difference between the Jew and the Greek: for the same Lord over all is rich unto all that call upon him. For whosoever shall call upon the name of the Lord shall be saved" (Rom 10:8-13).

([i]Last in the series of articles[/i])
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Mike Balog

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 Re: Humility and Faith

[b]Humility And Faith[/b] by Andrew Murray

"How can ye believe, which receive glory from one another, and the glory that cometh from the only God ye seek not?"-John 5: 44.

In an address I lately heard, the speaker said that the blessings of the higher Christian life were often like the objects exposed in a shop window,-one could see them clearly and yet could not reach them. If told to stretch out his hand and take, a man would answer, I cannot; there is a thick pane of plate-glass between me and them. And even so Christians may see clearly the blessed promises of perfect peace and rest, of overflowing love and joy, of abiding communion and fruitfulness, and yet feel that there was something between hindering the true possession. And what might that be? Nothing but pride. The promises made to faith are so free and sure; the invitations and encouragements so strong; the mighty power of God on which it may count is so near and free,-that it can only be something that hinders faith that hinders the blessing being ours. In our text Jesus discovers to us that it is indeed pride that makes faith impossible. "How can ye believe, which receive glory from one another?" As we see how in their very nature pride and faith are irreconcilably at variance, we shall learn that faith and humility are at root one, and that we never can have more of true faith than we have of true humility; we shall see that we may indeed have strong intellectual conviction and assurance of the truth while pride is kept in the heart, but that it makes the living faith, which has power with God, an impossibility.

We need only think for a moment what faith is. Is it not the confession of nothingness and helplessness, the surrender and the waiting to let God work? Is it not in itself the most humbling thing there can be, the acceptance of our place as dependents,who can claim or get or do nothing but what grace bestows?! Humility is 'simply the disposition which prepares the soul for living on trust. And every, even the most secret breathing of pride, in self-seeking, self-will, selfconfidence, or self exaltation, is just the strengthening of that self which cannot enter the kingdom, or possess the things of the kingdom, because it refuses to allow God to be what He is and must be there-- the All in All.

Faith is the organ or sense for the perception and apprehension of the heavenly world and its blessings. Faith seeks .the glory that comes from God, that only comes where God is All. As long as we take glory from one another, as long as ever we seek and love and jealously guard the glory of this life, the honor and reputation that comes from men, we do not seek, and cannot receive the glory that comes from God. Pride renders faith impossible. Salvation comes through a cross and a crucified Christ. Salvation is the fellowship with the crucified Christ in the Spirit of His cross. Salvation is union with and delight in, salvation is participation in, the humility of Jesus. Is it wonder that our faith is so feeble when pride still reigns so much, and we have scarce learnt even to long or pray for humility as the most needful and blessed part of salvation?

Humility and faith are more nearly allied in Scripture than many know. See it in the life of Christ. There are two cases in which He spoke of a great faith. Had not the centurion, at whose faith He marvelled, saying, "I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel!" spoken, "I am not worthy that Thou shouldst come under my roof"? And had not the mother to whom He spoke, "O woman,great is thy faith!" accepted the name of dog, and said, "Yea, Lord, yet the dogs eat of the crumbs'? It is the humility that brings a soul to be nothing before God, that also removes every hindrance to faith, and makes it only fear lest it should dishonor Him by not trusting Him wholly.

Brother, have we not here the cause of failure in the pursuit of holiness? Is it not this, though we knew it not, that made our consecration and our faith so superficial and so short-lived? We had no idea to what an extent pride and self were still secretly working within us, and how alone God by His incoming and His mighty power could cast them out. We understood not how nothing but the new and divine nature, taking entirely the place of the old self, could make us really humble. We knew not that absolute, unceasing, universal humility must be the rootdisposition of every prayer and every approach to God as well as of every dealing with man; and that we might as well attempt to see without eyes, or live without breath, as believe or draw nigh to God or dwell in His love, without an all-prevading humility and lowliness of heart.

Brother, have we not been making a mistake in taking so much trouble to believe, while all the time there was the old self in its pride seeking to possess itself of God's blessing and riches? No wonder we could not believe. Let us change our course. Let us seek first of all to humble ourselves under the mighty hand of God: He will exalt us. The cross, and the death, and the grave, into which Jesus humbled Himself, were His path to the glory of God. And they are our path. Let our one desire and our fervent prayer be, to be humbled with Him and like Him; let us accept gladly whatever can humble us before God or men;-this alone is the path to the glory of God.

You perhaps feel inclined to ask a question. I have spoken of some who have blessed experiences, or are the means of bringing blessing to others, and yet are lacking in humility. You ask whether these do not prove that they have true, even strong faith, though they show too clearly that they still seek too much the honor that cometh from men. There is more than one answer can be given. But the principal answer in our present connection is this: They indeed have a measure of faith, in proportion to which, with the special gifts bestowed upon them, is the blessing they bring to others. But in that very blessing the work of their faith is hindered, through the lack of humility. The blessing is often superficial or transitory, just because they are not the nothing that opens the way for God to be all. A deeper humility would without doubt bring a deeper and fuller blessing. The Holy Spirit not only working in them as a Spirit of power, but dwelling in them in the fullness of His grace, and specially that of humility, would through them communicate Himself to these converts for a life of power and holiness and steadfastness now all too little seen.

"How can ye believe, which receive glory from one another?" Brother! nothing can cure you of the desire of receiving glory from men, or of the sensitiveness and pain and anger which come when it is not given, but giving yourself to seek only the glory that comes from God. Let the glory of the Allglorious God be everything to you. You will be freed from the glory of men and of self, and be content and glad to be nothing. Out of this nothingness you will grow strong in faith, giving glory to God, and you will find that the deeper you sink in humility before Him, the nearer He is to fulfill the every desire of your Faith.


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Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2007/1/30 17:14Profile
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 Re: Jonathan Edwards - Undiscerned Spiritual Pride

[i]Proud people tend to speak of other’s sins--the miserable delusion of hypocrites, the deadness of some saints with bitterness, or the opposition to holiness of many believers. Pure Christian humility, however, is silent about the sins of others or speaks of them with grief and pity. The spiritually proud person finds fault with other saints for their lack of progress in grace, while the humble Christian sees so much evil in his own heart, and is so concerned about it, that he is not apt to be very busy with other hearts. He complains most of himself and his own spiritual coldness and readily hopes that most everybody has more love and thankfulness to God than he.

Spiritually proud people often speak of almost everything they see in others in the harshest, most severe language. They frequently say of an other’s opinion, conduct, or coldness that it is from the devil or from hell. Commonly, their criticism is directed against not only wicked men but also toward true children of God and those who are their superiors. The humble, however, even when they have extraordinary discoveries of God’s glory, are overwhelmed with their own vileness and sinfulness. Their exhortations to fellow Christians are given in a loving and humble manner, and they treat others with as much humility and gentleness as Christ, who is infinitely above them, treats them.[/i]


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Mike Balog

 2007/3/3 14:06Profile
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 Re: Pride

"Most accurately is [b]contention[/b] here traced to its proper source. "He that is of a [b]proud[/b] heart strirreth up strife" (Prov 28:25). All the crudeness of the day, all the novelties of doctrine producing contention (1 Tim 1:4; 2 Tim 2:23), originate in the proud swelling of "the fleshly mind" (Col 2:18. 1 Tim 6:3, 4). Men scorn the beaten track. They must strike out a new path. Singularity and extravagance are primary charms. They are ready to quarrel with every one, who does not value their notions as highly as they do. The desire of pre-eminence "I wrote unto the church: but Diotrephes, who loveth to have the preeminence among them, receiveth us not" (3 John, 9); revolt from authority (Num. 12:2) or sound doctrine (2 Tim 4:3, 4); party spirit, with the [i]pride[/i] of knowledge and gifts (1 Cor 3:3,4 with 4:8) -all produce the same results. Is it too much to say, that vain-glory hath lighted up all the sinful [i]contentions[/i], that have ever kindled in the Church? We must indeed "[i]contend[/i] for the faith" (Gal 2:5; 1 Thess 2:2; Jude, 3), though it be with our own compromising brethren. (Gal. 2:11) But even here how yet imperceptibly may pride insinuate itself under the cover of glorifying God! Truly 'is it the inmost coat, which we put on first, and put off last.'

This mischievous principle spreads in families, or among friends. 'Some point of honour must be maintained; some affront must be resented; some rival must be crushed or eclipsed; some renowned character emulated; or some superior equalled and surpassed.' Even in trifling disputes between relatives or neighbours-perhaps between Christians-each party [i]contends[/i] vehemently for his rights, instead of satisfying himself with the testimony of his conscience, and submitting rather to be misunderstood and misjudged, than to break the bond of the Divine brotherhood (1 Cor 6:7) In the wide field of the world we may well ask-"From whence come wars and fightings among you? Come they not from this lust" (James 4:1)? Often has wounded pride (Judg 12:1), even without any proved injury (2 Kings, 14:10), brought destructive [i]contention[/i] upon a land."


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Mike Balog

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 Re: pride,strife,vainglory

"All the crudeness of the day, all the novelties of doctrine producing contention (1 Tim 1:4; 2 Tim 2:23), originate in the proud swelling of "the fleshly mind" (Col 2:18. 1 Tim 6:3, 4)."




[i]Men scorn the beaten track. They must strike out a new path. [/i]


"Is it too much to say, that vain-glory hath lighted up all the sinful contentions, that have ever kindled in the Church?"


and this from Andrew Murray...


'How can ye believe, which receive glory from one another?" Brother! nothing can cure you of the desire of receiving glory from men, or of the sensitiveness and pain and anger which come when it is not given, but giving yourself to seek only the glory that comes from God. Let the glory of the Allglorious God be everything to you. You will be freed from the glory of men and of self, and be content and glad to be nothing. Out of this nothingness you will grow strong in faith, giving glory to God, and you will find that the deeper you sink in humility before Him, the nearer He is to fulfill the every desire of your Faith.'



[i]be content and glad to be nothing[/i]


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Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2007/3/3 23:39Profile
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 Re: Fight for unity or flight to hostility

Yes,

[i]Even in trifling disputes between relatives or neighbours-perhaps between Christians-each party contends vehemently for his rights, instead of satisfying himself with the testimony of his conscience, and submitting rather to be misunderstood and misjudged, than to break the bond of the Divine brotherhood[/i] (1 Cor 6:7)


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Mike Balog

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 Re: the main handle

'Surely we had enough separate rival church organizations already on our hands. Each working largely for its own interest, advancement, and glory... The New Testament Church seemed to be drifting toward intellectualism. I became much burdened for it... I felt the New Testament church was failing God, and I was looking to see where the Spirit might come forth... The curse everywhere was spiritual pride. Hiding their nakedness from God.... The oil (The Holy Ghost) ceases to flow, as in Elijah's time when there are no more empty vessels to be filled. People do not sense their need of God. But wherever there is a hungry heart, God will fill it. 'The rich or (full) He has sent away empty.'"'


"There will be no true and lasting revival until we die to our own stupid pride and selfish ambition."

[i]The curse everywhere was spiritual pride.[/i]

-From [i]The Seeds Of Revival

Prophetic Insights from the Writings of Frank Bartleman on the Causes and Conditions of Revival.

Compiled and Edited by David Smithers[/i]

[url=http://www.sermonindex.net/modules/articles/index.php?view=article&aid=16031]The Seeds of Revival[/url]



[i]The first and worst cause of error that prevails in our day is spiritual pride. This is the main door by which the devil comes into the hearts of those who are zealous for the advancement of Christ. It is the chief inlet of smoke from the bottomless pit to darken the mind and mislead the judgment, and the main handle by which Satan takes hold of Christians to hinder a work of God.[/i]


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Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2007/3/5 20:05Profile
ChrisJD
Member



Joined: 2006/2/11
Posts: 2895
Philadelphia PA

 Re: a voice from the past

"We are expecting wonderful things from the Lord for 1907. The closing up of the old year and beginning of the new found us on our knees at Azusa Mission."


'"We acknowledge Christ only, His truth, His Word. We must tarry much before Him. We must acknowledge that He is in our midst, walking among the golden candlesticks, pruning, purging. He who moved among the golden candlesticks, is moving in our midst now. We must recognize Him alone as Head over all, and know no man after the flesh. The Spirit of God will teach us, if we keep low in love and humility before Him. Our Lord says, "I smile upon you, when you are seeking My will, My glory only. There must be no glorying in names or orders or systems, only in Myself alone. All fullness is in me, all power is in My Gospel."

We must give God all the glory in this work. We must keep very humble at His feet. He recognizes no flesh, no color, no names. We must not glory in Azusa Mission, nor in anything but the Lord Jesus Christ by whom the world is crucified unto us and we unto the world.'



[i]We must keep very humble at His feet.[/i]


- Taken from [i]Edition 5 - Beginning of World Wide Revival(Found under other speakers William Seymour)[/i]


[url=http://www.sermonindex.net/modules/articles/index.php?view=article&aid=3484]Edition 5 - Beginning of World Wide Revival[/url]


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Christopher Joel Dandrow

 2007/3/5 20:19Profile
crsschk
Member



Joined: 2003/6/11
Posts: 9192
Santa Clara, CA

 Re: Pride and Humility

"Two rules strongly present themselves-[i]Be careful in giving praise[/i]. Even the children of the world can discover the deadly tenacity of pride in our nature. 'Do you know'-remarked M. de Stael on her death-bed-'what is the last thing to die in man? It is self-love.' We cannot therefore do our brother a greater injury, than by supplying fuel for pride by irregulated praise. Even if he be a public man, he is not always before God as in the eyes of the Church. It may be that the most eminent servant of God is one, of whom the Church has taken little cognizance. And at best we are far too short-sighted to take the accurate measure of our brother's piety. We cannot weigh it aright without the balances of the sanctuary, which are [i]fully[/i] in his hands alone, who searcheth the heart. Therefore till the day appointed for manifestation, it is well to judge each other, whether for good or evil, with becoming moderation. And to which-is it merciful to expose a weak fellow-sinner to the frown of a jealous God, by stirring up the innate corruption of his heart? For put even the finest [i]gold into the furnace[/i], how humbling is the spectacle of the dross that yet cleaves to it! [i]Be not less careful in receiving praise[/i]. While our taste revolts from extravagant flattery, yet we are apt to think it kindly meant, and it is very rare not to take unconsciously a drop of the poison. But the praise of the church is by far the most insidious poison,-so refined, so luscious! Specially when we feel it to be lawfully obtained, how hard to receive it with self-renouncing consecration to God! 'Christian! thou knowest thou carriest gunpowder about thee. Desire those that carry fire to keep at a distance. It is a dangerous crisis, when a proud heart meets with flattering lips.' May not even the habit of speaking humbly of ourselves be a snare of the devil? Would it not be safer not to speak of ourselves at all? At least, to confine our conversation [i]in strict sincerity[/i] to what we are, not what we appear to be, would be a "wise refraining of our lips" (Chap 10:19). Guard against dwelling even in thought upon anything, that brings man's approving eye upon us. Delight mainly in those works, that are only under the eye of God. Value alone his approbation. Ever think of the love of human praise as the most deadly bane of a Christian profession, to be resisted with intense energy and perseverance (John; 5:44; 12:42, 43)."


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Mike Balog

 2007/3/7 10:07Profile





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