SermonIndex Audio Sermons
Image Map
Audio Sermons : ~ Christian Audio Books : C. H. Spurgeon : 

C.H. Spurgeon

C.H. Spurgeon (1834 - 1892)

Listen to freely downloadable audio sermons by the speaker C.H. Spurgeon in mp3 format. Spurgeon quickly became known as one of the most influential preachers of his time. Well known for his biblical powerful expositions of scripture and oratory ability. In modern evangelical circles he is stated to be the "Prince of Preachers." He pastored the Metropolitan Tabernacle in downtown London, England.

His church was part of a particular baptist church movement and they defended and preached Christ and Him crucified and the purity of the Gospel message. Spurgeon never gave altar calls but always extended the invitation to come to Christ. He was a faithful minister in his time that glorified God and brought many to the living Christ.

 Man's Ruin and God's Remedy by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
1703 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Man's Ruin and God's Remedy by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Numbers 21:8  
Description: MAN'S RUIN AND GOD'S REMEDY. DELIVERED ON SABBATH MORNING, NOVEMBER 20TH, 1859, BY THE REV. C. H. SPURGEON, AT THE MUSIC HALL, ROYAL SURREY GARDENS. “And the Lord said unto Moses, Make thee a fiery serpent, and set it upon a pole: and it shall come to pass that every one that is bitten, when he looketh upon it, shall live.” — Numbers 21:8. I DO not propose this morning to explain again the mystery of the brazen serpent. As many of you well remember, not long ago I preached upon that subject, and endeavored to expound it in all its lengths and breadths. I have a somewhat similar object at the present time, the details may indeed be different, but after all the moral will be the same. Man has very many wants, and he should be grateful whenever the least of them is supplied. But he has one want which overtops every other: it is the want of bread. Give him raiment, house him well, decorate and adorn him, yet if you give him not bread, his body faints, he dies of hunger. Hence it is that while the earth when it is tilled is made to bring forth many things that minister unto the comfort and luxury of men, yet man is wise enough to understand that since bread is his chief want, he must be most careful concerning corn. He therefore sows broad acres with it, and he cultivates more of this, which is the grandest necessary, than he doth of anything else in his husbandry. I feel that this is the only excuse I can offer you for coming back again constantly...
1604 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Martha and Mary by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic: Martha
Scripture(s): Luke 10:38-42  
Description: IT is not an easy thing to maintain the balance of our spiritual life. No man can be spiritually healthy who does not meditate and commune; no man, on the other hand, is as he should be unless he is active and diligent in holy service. David sweetly sang, “He maketh me to lie down in green pastures;” there was the contemplative, “he leadeth me beside the still waters;” there was the active and progressive: the difficulty is to maintain the two, and to keep each in its relative proportion to the other. We must not be so active as to neglect communion, nor so contemplative as to become unpractical. In the chapter from which our text is taken, we have several lessons on this subject...
2104 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Memento Mori by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
1390 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Memory - The Handmaid of Hope by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Lamentations 3:21  
Description: DELIVERED ON SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 15TH, 1865, BY C. H. SPURGEON, AT THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, NEWINGTON. “This I recall to my mind,therefore have I hope.”-Lamentations 3:21. MEMORY is very often the servant of despondency. Despairing minds call to remembrance every dark foreboding in the past, and every gloomy feature in the present. Memory stands like a handmaiden, clothed in sackcloth, presenting to her master a cup of mingled gall and wormwood. Like Mercury, she hastes, with winged heel, to gather fresh thorns with which to fill the uneasy pillow, and to bind fresh rods with which to scourge the already bleeding heart. There is, however, no necessity for this. Wisdom will transform memory into an angel of comfort. That same recollection which may in its left hand bring so many dark and gloomy omens, may be trained to bear in its right hand a wealth of hopeful signs. She need not wear a crown of iron, she may encircle her brow with a fillet of gold, all spangled with stars. When Christian, according to Bunyan, was locked up in Doubting Castle, memory formed the crab-tree cudgel with which the famous giant beat his captives so terribly. They remembered how they had left the right road, how they had been warned not to do so, and how in rebellion against their better selves, they wandered into By-path Meadow. They remembered all their past misdeeds, their sins, their evil thoughts and evil words, and all these were so many knots in the cudgel...
1889 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Mercy, Omnipotence, and Justice by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Nahum 1:3  
Description: WORKS of art require some education in the beholder, before they can be thoroughly appreciated. We do not expect that the uninstructed should at once perceive the varied excellencies of a painting from some master hand; we do not imagine that the superlative glories of the harmonies of the Princes of Song will enrapture the ears of clownish listeners. There must be something in the man himself, before he can understand the wonders either of nature or of art. Certainly this is true of character. By reason of failures in our character and faults in our life, we are not capable of understanding all the separate beauties, and the united perfection of the character of Christ, or of God, his Father. Were we ourselves as pure as the angels in heaven, were we what our race once was in the garden of Eden, immaculate and perfect, it is quite certain that we should have a far better and nobler idea of the character of God than we can by possibility attain unto in our fallen state. But you cannot fail to notice, that men, through the alienation of their natures, are continually misrepresenting God, because they cannot appreciate his perfection. Does God at one time withhold his hand from wrath?...
1763 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Mr. Fearing Comforted by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
1757 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Not Now, But Hereafter! by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
1635 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 One Antidote for Many Ills by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
1574 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 One Lion; Two Lions; No Lion at All by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Proverbs 22:13  
Description: “The slothful man saith, There is a lion without, I shall be slain in the streets.”- Proverbs 22:13. THIS slothful man seems to cherish that one dread of his about the lions as if it were his favorite aversion, and he felt it to be too much trouble to invent another excuse. Perhaps he hugs it to his soul all the more because it is a home-born fear, conjured up by his own imagination; and us mothers are said to love their weakest children best, so is he fondest of this most imbecile of excuses at any rate, it serves him for a passable excuse for laziness, and that is what he wants. If you can get the king of beasts to apologize for your idleness there is a sort of royalty about your pretences: he hopes his sloth will appear the less disgraceful if he can paint a lion rampant upon its shield. I am not about to speak of slothful men in general, albeit that when a man does not diligently attend to his business he is committing great wrong to himself and to others. When a man is slothful as a servant he is unjust to his employers, and when he is in business on his own account idleness is usually a wrong to his wife and family. I know one who is the cause of poverty and want to those whom he ought to provide for; and all because...
1565 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 One of the Master's Choice Sayings by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Matthew 14:16  
Description: “But Jesus said unto them, They need not depart.” — Matthew 14:16. OF course the Master was right, but he appeared to speak unreasonably. It seemed self-evident that the people very much needed to depart. They had been all day long hearing the preacher, the most of them had not broken their fast, and they were ready to faint for hunger. The only chance of their being fed was to let them break up into small parties, and forage for themselves among the surrounding villages. But our Lord declared that there was no necessity for them to go away from him, even though they were hungry, and famished, and in a desert place. Now, if there was no necessity for hungry hearers to go away, much less will it ever be needful for loving disciples to depart from him. If these, who were hearers only, - and the bulk of them were nothing more, a congregation collected by curiosity, and held together by the charm of his eloquence, and by the renown of his miracles, - if these needed not to depart, much leas need they depart who are his own friends and companions, his chosen and beloved. If the crowds needed not through hunger to depart bodily, much less need any of the saints depart spiritually from their Lord. There is no necessity that our communion with Christ should ever be suspended...
1106 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Our Motto by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Ephesians 6:7  
Description: If we are enabled to adopt this motto it will, influence our work itself; and secondly elevate our spirit concerning that work. Should the Lord really be the all in all of our lives, it is after all only what he has a right to expect, and what we are under a thousand obligations to give to him.
1824 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Paul's Parenthesis by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): 1 Corinthians 15:10  
Description: A SERMON PUBLISHED ON THURSDAY, MARCH 19TH, 1908, DELIVERED BY C. H. SPURGEON, AT THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, NEWINGTON, ON LORD'S-DAY EVENING, APRIL 26TH, 1874. “By the grace of God I am what I am.” — 1 Corinthians 15:10. IF you will read the context of this passage, you will find that these words occur in one of Paul's digressions, or parentheses. He was a writer who very frequently went off at a tangent; he often left the subject on which he was writing, turned his thoughts in quite another direction, and then came back, and went on with the subject which he had left for a while. In this respect, I have; often, in my own mind, likened the apostle Paul to Samson. When he was on the road to Timnath with his father and mother he turned aside to slay the lion, and afterwards to find the honey in the carcass, and each time he came back to his parents just as if nothing had happened. So the apostle Paul often turns aside from some grand argument upon which he is engaged, and says something very valuable and important upon quite another topic, and then comes back again, and calmly and deliberately goes on with his argument.
1429 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Perfection in Faith by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
1665 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Plenary Absolution by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Psalm 103:12  
Description: DELIVERED BY C. H. SPURGEON, AT THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, NEWINGTON. “As far as the east is from the west, so far hath he removed our transgressions from us.” — Psalm 103:12. WE shall aim at no novelty to-night, nor shall we try to serve up the old truths in any new and attractive forms. Upon your tables you always require bread, and generally you account salt to be indispensable. Some kinds of food are presented to us over and over again, and it would augur ill for our health if they were not always relished. It was an evil lusting which made Israel tire of the manna; an Israelite in his right mind found it to be a dainty still, though he ate of it for every day of his forty years' pilgrimage. Who tires of the verdure of the fields, the light of the sun, or the air we breathe? These things are ever fresh and new, and ever needful to us. The doctrine of forgiving love is one of those necessaries of daily life, concerning which it may be affirmed that if we should set them before you every day we should not be guilty of vain repetition. None need fear of tiring man, or vexing God's Spirit by harping too much on this string. Therefore come we to our favourite theme to-night. To speak of the great gospel truth of the forgiveness of sin in the simplest manner we possibly can, is the purpose we have immediately in view...
1465 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Ploughing a Rock by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Amos 6:12  
Description: THESE two questions are evidently Oriental proverbial expressions. Proverbs have always been used by the wisest of men. Solomon not only spoke and wrote a great many, but he also made a considerable collection of those uttered by others. We find, in the writings of such notable thinkers as Socrates, and Pliny, and Aristotle, an abundance of short, pithy sentences, many of which can be used as proverbs. Proverbs have great force in them, because they are condensed wisdom. They are generally most convincing; it is hardly ever possible to answer or controvert them. They carry truth home as an arrow has often been known to carry death to the person aimed at, for they strike, they stick, they penetrate, they wound. Our Lord Jesus very frequently made use of proverbs; nor was he singular in so doing. The prophets of old constantly employed them; and here, in our text, we see Amos, — who, from his occupation as a herdsman and gatherer of sycamore fruit, was probably more familiar with their use than some others of the prophets were, — puts together two proverbs which were commonly used to signify that men do not, as a rule, continue to labor in vain, and spend their strength for nought.
1654 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Portraits of Christ by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Description: nil
2863 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Return Unto Thy Rest by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Psalm 116:7  
Description: “Return unto thy rest, O my soul; for the Lord hath dealt bountifully with thee.”— Psalm 116:7. You, who have not believed in our Lord Jesus Christ, have no rest to which you can return, for you have never, found any. May God grant to you the grace to come unto Christ that you may find rest unto your souls! But we, who believe in him, do enter into rest. We are sometimes described as journeying through the wilderness towards Canaan, and the type is quite allowable; but, still, it must not be pressed, too far; for, in another sense, we have already entered into our rest. We have entered the Canaan which our Joshua has given unto us; Moses, by the law, could not lead us into this promised land; but Jesus has brought us into it, and we now have our portion and our inheritance in the covenant blessings which God has provided for his people in Christ Jesus his Son. God's people, when they are as they ought to be, are in a state of rest even now. I do not mean that they will have rest so far as this world is concerned, for this earth is not our rest, it is polluted; but I do mean that as the apostle Paul writes to the Romans, 'There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are, in Christ Jesus, who walk not after the flesh, but after the Spirit.'
1350 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Rough, But Friendly by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic: Joseph
Scripture(s): Genesis 42:6  
Description: “Then Joseph commanded to fill their sacks with corn, and to restore every man's money into his sack, and to give them provisions for the way: and thus did he unto them.” — Genesis 42:6. AN immense number of persons came down into Egypt from all parts of the world to buy corn. Many of these Joseph never saw. Many others came into his personal presence. I do not find that of all who came, he treated any of them roughly, except his own brethren. 'Strange!' you will say, and if you did not know the sequel of the story, it would not only seem strange, but cruel. You would not. know how to account for such a thing. Very like this is the manner of God's providence. There are thousands of people living in this world, with all if whom God deals according to wisdom. We all bear trouble in a measure, for 'Man is born unto trouble, as the sparks fly upwards.' .Some have more troubles than others, and these often happen to be those who are dearest to the Lord. If any man escape the rod, the true-born children of the royal family of heaven never can. Some may sin and prosper, but the righteous, if they sin, suffer. The ungodly are permitted to fatten like sheep for the slaughter, to have no bands even in their death; their strength is firm; they are not in trouble, as other men, neither are they plagued like other men...
1551 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)
 Rubbish by C. H. Spurgeon

Topic:
Scripture(s): Nehemiah 4:10  
Description: Now, this, it seems to me, is intended, or at least may justifiably be used, for a type of the work which God's people have to carry on in the name of Jesus, and in the power of his Spirit, in the world. We have to build the wall of the church for God, but we cannot build it, for there is so much rubbish in our way. This is true, first, of the building of the church, which is the Jerusalem of God; and this is equally true of the temple of God, which is to be built in each one of our hearts. Full often we feel discouraged. Though we hear the voice that saith, “But ye, beloved, building up yourselves on your most holy faith, praying in the Holy Ghost, keep yourselves in the love of God,” still we are apt to feel that we cannot build this wall, because there is so much rubbish.
2283 downloads 
Sermon Comments (0)


  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9  





©2002-2019 SermonIndex.net
Promoting Genuine Biblical Revival.
Privacy Policy