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C.H. Spurgeon

C.H. Spurgeon (1834 - 1892)

Listen to freely downloadable audio sermons by the speaker C.H. Spurgeon in mp3 format. Spurgeon quickly became known as one of the most influential preachers of his time. Well known for his biblical powerful expositions of scripture and oratory ability. In modern evangelical circles he is stated to be the "Prince of Preachers." He pastored the Metropolitan Tabernacle in downtown London, England.

His church was part of a particular baptist church movement and they defended and preached Christ and Him crucified and the purity of the Gospel message. Spurgeon never gave altar calls but always extended the invitation to come to Christ. He was a faithful minister in his time that glorified God and brought many to the living Christ.

 Satan's Banquet by C. H. Spurgeon

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2026 downloads 
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 Self Examination by C. H. Spurgeon

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2591 downloads 
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 Sin Immeasurable by C. H. Spurgeon

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1621 downloads 
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 Sovereignty and Salvation by C. H. Spurgeon

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1676 downloads 
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 Speak for Yourself. A Challenge! by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): John 9:21  
Description: DELIVERED BY C. H. SPURGEON, AT THE METROPOLITAN TABERNACLE, NEWINGTON. “He is of age; ask him: he shall speak for himself.”-John 9:21 THOSE of you, dear friends, who were present this morning will remember that our subject was “Jesus Christ himself.” We dwelt upon his blessed person. Our faith is fixed on him; our affections are drawn to him; our hopes all bend toward him. Though everything he said or did is precious, yet Jesus himself stands first in our estimation. To know him, to believe him, to love him, is the very essence of our Christianity. Tonight we change our theme. There is a “himself” in our text this evening- a “himself” ‘tis true of a much humbler order. How stand we each one for himself? Our individuality and the personal responsibilities which fall upon ourselves in reference to Christ must not be lost sight of. If, for instance, a spiritual miracle has been wrought upon us, if we are obliged to confess-nay, if we are delighted to confess-that he has opened our eyes, then we are bound, especially those of us who are of ripe understanding, who may be said to be of full age, we are bound to bear our own personal testimony to him. The allegation and the appeal may alike apply to each one of us, “He is of age; ask him: he shall speak for himself.” Jesus Christ himself bore our sins, as we heard this morning. He gave himself for us, he served us, not by proxy, but by personal consecration; not by alms doled out pitifully, but by his life surrendered...
1410 downloads 
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 Spiritual Peace by C. H. Spurgeon

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1708 downloads 
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 Spiritual Religion by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): John 6:63  
Description: INTENDED FOR READING ON LORD'S-DAY, JUNE 3RD, 1900, DELIVERED BY C. H. SPURGEON, AT NEW PARK STREET CHAPEL, SOUTHWARK, ON A THURSDAY EVENING, EARLY IN THE YEAR 1858. “It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing.” — John 6:63. To a casual reader, it looks as if the meaning of this passage lay upon the very surface; but he who has studied the chapter carefully has discovered that it is a sentence replete with many difficulties as to the exact interpretation of it. I shall not, however, waste your time by entering into any critical discussion of it; but shall only try to give you simply what I believe to be the mind of the Spirit, as uttered by the lips of Jesus in this passage; and after I have done that, I shall then revert to what I shall call the meaning which any person would give to it who is not a diligent and careful student of Scripture. That meaning being true, although not the special truth taught in this passage, I shall briefly enlarge upon it. “It is the spirit that quickeneth; the flesh profiteth nothing.” I suppose there is not a man in the world who could form any intelligent idea of what a spirit is. It is very easy for persons to define a spirit by saying what it is not; but I query whether there is, or ever could be, any man who could form any idea of what it is. We sometimes talk about seeing a spirit; ignorant persons in ages gone by, and some living now in benighted villages, talk about seeing spirits by night.
1390 downloads 
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 Spiritual Resurrection by C. H. Spurgeon

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1654 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #1 by C. H. Spurgeon

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2128 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #2 by C. H. Spurgeon

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1613 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #3 by C. H. Spurgeon

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1618 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #4 by C. H. Spurgeon

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1549 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #5 by C. H. Spurgeon

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1505 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #6 by C. H. Spurgeon

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1457 downloads 
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 Spurgeon A New Biography #7 by C. H. Spurgeon

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1403 downloads 
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 Sunshine in the Heart by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): Psalm 37:4  
Description: THERE are two teachings in our text which must be very surprising to those who are strangers to vital godliness; to sincere believers these marvels are recognised facts, but to the outside world they will appear passing strange. We have here, first of all, the life of a believer described as a delight in God; and thus we are certified of the great truth that true religion overflows with happiness and joy. Ungodly persons and mere professors never look upon religion as a joyful thing, to them it is service, duty, or necessity, but never pleasure and delight.
2090 downloads 
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 Sweet Comfort for Feeble Saints by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): Matthew 12:20  
Description: A SERMON DELIVERED ON SABBATH MORNING, FEBRUARY 4, 1855, BY THE REV. C. H. SPURGEON, AT NEW PARK STREET CHAPEL, SOUTHWARK. “A bruised reed shall he not break, and smoking flax shall he not quench, till he send forth judgement unto victory.”-Matthew 12:20. BABBLING fame ever loves to talk of one man or another. Some there be whose glory it trumpets forth, and whose honor it extols above the heavens. Some are her favorites, and their names are carved on marble, and heard in every land, and every clime. Fame is not an impartial judge; she has her favorites. Some men she extols, exalts, and almost deifies; others, whose virtues are far greater, and whose characters are more deserving of commendation, she passes by unheeded, and puts the finger of silence on her lips. You will generally find that those persons beloved by fame are men made of brass or iron, and cast in a rough mould. Fame caresseth Ceasar, because he ruled the earth with a rod of iron. Fame loves Luther, because he boldly and manfully defied the Pope of Rome, and with knit brow dared laugh at the thunders of the Vatican. Fame admires Knox; for he was stern, and proved himself the bravest of the brave. Generally, you will find her choosing out the men of fire and mettle, who stood before their fellow-creatures fearless of them, men who were made of courage; who were consolidated lumps of fearlessness, and never knew what timidity might be.
1310 downloads 
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 Terrible Convictions and Gentle Drawings by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): Psalms 32:3-4  
Description: David here describes a very common experience amongst convinced sinners. He was subjected to extreme terrors and pangs of conscience. These terrors were continual; they scared him at night with visions, they terrified him all day with dark and gloomy forebodings. “Day and night thy hand was heavy upon me.” His pain was so extreme, that when he resorted to prayer he could scarcely utter an articulate word. There were groanings that could not be uttered within his spirit; and hence he calls his prayer roaring — a “roaring all the day long.” Wherever he was, his spirit seemed to be always sighing, sending a full torrent of melancholy groans upwards towards God; a “roaring all the day long.” So far did this groaning proceed, that at last his bodily frame began to show evidences of it. He grew old, and that not merely in the lines of the countenance and the falling in of the cheeks, but his very bones seemed as if they partook of the suffering. He became like an old man before his time. We have heard of some who through severe trouble have had their hair blanched in a single night.
1474 downloads 
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 The Alarm by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): Psalm 57:8  
Description: “I myself will awake early.” — Psalm 57:8. THE proper subject to treat upon with such a text as this would be the propriety and excellence of early rising, especially when we are desirous of praising or serving God. The dew of dawn should be consecrated to devotion. The text is a very remarkable expression, and might fitly be made the early-riser's motto. It is, in the original, a highly poetical phrase, and Milton and others have borrowed or imitated it. 'I will awaken the morning.' So early would the psalmist arise for the praise of God, that he would call up the day, and bid the sun arise from the chambers of the east, and proceed upon his journey. 'I will awaken the morning.' Early rising has the example of Old Testament saints to recommend it, and many modern saints having conscientiously practiced it, have been loud in its praise. It is an economy of time, and an assistance to health, and thus it doubly lengthens life. Late rising is too often the token of indolence, and the cause of disorder throughout the whole day. Be assured that the best hours are the first. Our City habits are to be deplored, because by late hours of retirement at night we find early rising difficult if not impossible. If we are able to escape the shackels of custom, and secure for devotion and contemplation the hour when the dew is on the grass, we may count ourselves thrice happy...
1453 downloads 
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 The Alarum by C. H. Spurgeon

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Scripture(s): Psalm 57:8  
Description: “I myself will awake early.” — Psalm 57:8. THE proper subject to treat upon with such a text as this would be the propriety and excellence of early rising, especially when we are desirous of praising or serving God. The dew of dawn should be consecrated to devotion. The text is a very remarkable expression, and might fitly be made the early-riser's motto. It is, in the original, a highly poetical phrase, and Milton and others have borrowed or imitated it. 'I will awaken the morning.' So early would the psalmist arise for the praise of God, that he would call up the day, and bid the sun arise from the chambers of the east, and proceed upon his journey. 'I will awaken the morning.' Early rising has the example of Old Testament saints to recommend it, and many modern saints having conscientiously practiced it, have been loud in its praise. It is an economy of time, and an assistance to health, and thus it doubly lengthens life. Late rising is too often the token of indolence, and the cause of disorder throughout the whole day. Be assured that the best hours are the first. Our City habits are to be deplored, because by late hours of retirement at night we find early rising difficult if not impossible. If we are able to escape the shackels of custom, and secure for devotion and contemplation the hour when the dew is on the grass, we may count ourselves thrice happy...
989 downloads 
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