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C.H. Spurgeon

C.H. Spurgeon (1834 - 1892)

View images and photos of the speaker C.H. Spurgeon. Spurgeon quickly became known as one of the most influential preachers of his time. Well known for his biblical powerful expositions of scripture and oratory ability. In modern evangelical circles he is stated to be the "Prince of Preachers." He pastored the Metropolitan Tabernacle in downtown London, England.

His church was part of a particular baptist church movement and they defended and preached Christ and Him crucified and the purity of the Gospel message. Spurgeon never gave altar calls but always extended the invitation to come to Christ. He was a faithful minister in his time that glorified God and brought many to the living Christ.

Lectures to Students images 04

Lectures to Students images 04

Description: ¬ďAt last the time came when hell had gathered up all its forces, and now was also come the hour when Christ, as our substitute, must carry his obedience to the utmost length; he must be obedient unto death. He has been a substitute up till now; will he now throw down his vicarious character? Will he now renounce our responsibilities, and declare that we may stand for ourselves? Not he! He undertook, and must go through. Sweating great drops of blood, he nevertheless flinches not from the dread assault. Wounded in hands and in feet he still maintained his ground, and though, for obedience sake, he bowed his head to die, yet in that dying he slew death, put his foot upon the dragon¬ís neck, crushed the head of the old serpent, and beat our adversaries as small as the dust of the threshing floor.¬Ē
Lectures to Students images 05

Lectures to Students images 05

Description: One must wonder aloud if people would be so hungry for non-biblical (and unbiblical) ¬ďpictures of Christ¬Ē if such eminently biblical ¬ďpictures of Christ¬Ē drawn from the actual content of the Scriptures were more a mark of our preaching. All of this, of course, takes work. Even with Spurgeon¬ís remarkable memory, the crafting of such items for the pulpit did not come without much general and particular preparation. Such preparation is, however, part of our work as preachers. We should labor at it with the confidence that God will use it to turn our often dark, stuffy sermons into bright and airy proclamations of the living Word of God. Pay attention to the innumerable things that can turn your sermon lessons into illustrations. Study how other preachers (like Spurgeon) have done this in an exemplary manner.
Lectures to Students images 06

Lectures to Students images 06

Description: Discipline yourself to speak on all occasions with the use of similes, metaphors, and images that make even regular conversation sparkle. Review your sermon outline with the thought of ¬ďturning ears into eyes.¬Ē Then go to the pulpit stripped of the idea that fine doctrinal formulations alone make a sermon. Let the people see your doctrine, breathe your teaching, taste the things of the Christ you are privileged to proclaim, feel the truths of sin and holiness, war and peace, hell and heaven, and even smell the fragrance of the Gospel, cf. 2 Cor.2:14f. Both you and the congregation you are called to serve will sense the difference immediately!
Let me hide myself in thee

Let me hide myself in thee

Description: The dove is hunted by the hawk, and finds no security from its restless enemy. It has learned, that there is shelter for it in the cleft of the rock, and it hastens there with gladsome wing. Once wholly sheltered within its refuge, it fears no bird of prey. But if it did not hide itself in the rock, it would be seized upon by its adversary. The rock would be of no use to the dove, if the dove did not enter its cleft. The whole body must be hidden in the rock. What if ten thousand other birds found a fortress there, yet that fact would not save the one dove which is now pursued by the hawk! It must put its whole self into the shelter, and bury itself within its refuge, or its life will be forfeited to the destroyer.
What a picture of faith is this! It is entering into Jesus, hiding in his wounds.
New York Street Chapel

New York Street Chapel

Description: Many writers in religious and secular journals expressed the opinion that the new preacher was a worthy successor to Bunyan and Wesley and Whitefield, and that he would rival, if not eclipse, such men as William Carey, Gill, Rippon and Robert Hall. In the Morning Advertiser, James Grant wrote¬ó"He is quite an original preacher and therefore will always draw large congregations, and consequently may be eminently made the means of doing great good to classes of persons who might never otherwise be brought within the sound of a faithfully preached Gospel. He has evidently made George Whitefield his model, and, like that unparalleled preacher, that prince of pulpit orators, is very fond of striking apostrophes." Later James Grant noted with pleasure that popular applause had not spoiled the preacher, and continued, "With regard again to our other fear, that his excellence as a preacher would not be sustained, the event has, we rejoice to say, no less agreeably proved the groundlessness of our apprehensions. There is no falling off whatever. On the contrary, he is in some respects improving with the lapse of time. We fancy we can see his striking originality to greater advantage that at first."
Perplexed with Doubt

Perplexed with Doubt

Description: I am not perplexed with doubt, because the truth which I believe has wrought a miracle on me. By its means I have received and still retain a new life, to which I was once a stranger: and this is confirmation of the strongest sort. I am like the good man and his wife who had kept a lighthouse for years. A visitor, who came to see the lighthouse, looking out from the window over the waste of waters, asked the good woman, "Are you not afraid at night, when the storm is out, and the big waves dash right over the lantern? Do you not fear that the lighthouse, and all that is in it, will be carried away? I am sure I should be afraid to trust myself in a slender tower in the midst of the great billows." The woman remarked that the idea never occurred to her now. She had lived there so long that she felt as safe on the lone rock as ever she did when she lived on the mainland. As for her husband, when asked if he did not feel anxious when the wind blew a hurricane, he answered, "Yes, I feel anxious to keep the lamps well trimmed, and the light burning, lest any vessel should be wrecked." As to anxiety about the safety of the lighthouse, or his own personal security in it, he had outlived all that. Even so it is with the full-grown believer. He can humbly say, "I know whom I have believed, and am persuaded that he is able to keep that which I have committed unto him against that day." From henceforth let no man trouble me with doubts and questionings; I bear in my soul the proofs of the Spirit's truth and power, and I will have none of your artful reasonings. The gospel to me is truth: I am content to perish if it be not true. I risk my soul's eternal fate upon the truth of the gospel, and I know that there is no risk in it. My one concern is to keep the lights burning, that I may thereby benefit others. Only let the Lord give me oil enough to feed my lamp, so that I may cast a ray across the dark and treacherous sea of life, and I am well content.
Preaching Flyer for Spurgeon

Preaching Flyer for Spurgeon

Description: He wrought enough in one short lifetime for a dozen strong men. He fully met Emerson's challenge: "Go put your creed into your deed." Think of the vast number of his printed sermons ¬ó over 3500! Reading one a day would take ten years! And he was the author of many other books besides his sermons. From this one incessantly busy preacher some 200 volumes have gone forth to the world, extra of all his other Herculean labors. It is an astounding story of vast and far-reaching achievements. Any one of the several institutions vitally linked with his life would be enough to crown his life with an enviable immortality. Look at his pastors' college, with its hundreds upon hundreds of men witnessing for Christ around the encircling globe. Look at his orphanage, his almshouses, his colportage association. Preceding any and all of these institutions, look at his vast ministry through the great church with the lines of its testimony going out of the ends of the earth.
Preaching in the Surrey Gardens Music Hall

Preaching in the Surrey Gardens Music Hall

Description: Charles Haddon Spurgeon now found time to revise the printed sermons, and he wrote that¬ó"the work of revision has been a very useful exercise to me, supplying in great measure that training in correct language which is obtained by those who write their productions before they deliver them. The labor has been far greater than some suppose and has usually occupied the best hours of Monday and involved the burning of no inconsiderable portion of midnight oil. Feeling that I had a constituency well deserving my best efforts, I have never grudged the hours, though often the brain has been wearied and the pleasure has hardened into task." The preacher took a much greater interest, too, than heretofore in preparing the prefaces to the annual volume. Thus, in the eighth he declared that he wished to commune a little with the great host of readers who continually perused the discourses and commenced forthwith to address various classes.
sheep being shorn

sheep being shorn

Description: Oh, that you may also trust the Lord for all the sufferings of this present time! In the world you will have tribulation; learn by faith to know that all things work together for good, and then submit yourself to the Lord's will. Look at the sheep when it is being shorn. If it lies quite still, the shears will not hurt it; if it struggles, or even shrinks, it may be pricked. Submit yourselves under the hand of God, and affliction will lose its sharpness. Self-will and repining cause us a hundred times more grief than our afflictions themselves. So believe your Lord as to be certain that his will must be far better than yours, and therefore you not only submit to it, but even rejoice in it. Trust the Lord Jesus in the matter of sanctification. Certain friends appear to think that the Lord Jesus cannot sanctify them wholly, spirit, soul, and body. Hence they willingly give way to such and such sins under the notion that there is no help for it, but that they must pay tribute to the devil, as long as they live in that particular form. Do not basely bow your neck in bondage to any sin, but strike hard for liberty. Be it anger, or unbelief, or sloth, or any other form of iniquity, we are able, by divine grace, to drive out the Canaanite, and, what is more, we must drive him out. No virtue is impossible to him that believeth in Jesus, and no sin need have victory over him. Indeed, it is written, "Sin shall not have dominion over you: for ye are not under the law, but under grace." Believe for high degrees of joy in the Lord, and likeness to Jesus, and advance to take full possession of these precious things; for as thou believest, so shall it be unto thee. "All things are possible to him that believeth"; and he who is the chief of sinners may yet be not a whit behind the greatest of saints.
Simple Matters

Simple Matters

Description: God has been pleased to make the necessities of life very simple matters. We must eat; and even a blind man can find the way to his mouth. We must drink; and even the tiniest babe knows how to do this without instruction. We have a fountain in the grounds of the Stockwell Orphanage, and when it is running in the hot weather, the boys go to it naturally. We have no class for fountain-drill. Many poor boys have come to the Orphanage, but never one who was so ignorant that he did not know how to drink. Now faith is, in spiritual things, what eating and drinking are in temporal things. By the mouth of faith we take the blessings of grace into our spiritual nature, and they are ours. O you who would believe, but think you cannot, do you not see that, as one can drink without strength, and as one can eat without strength, and gets strength by eating, so we may receive Jesus without effort, and by accepting him we receive power for all such further effort as we may be called to put forth?
Spurgeon in the Pulpit

Spurgeon in the Pulpit

Description: Before all else, Mr. Spurgeon was a preacher of the glorious gospel of the grace of God. When a friend asked Charles Lamb if he had ever heard Coleridge preach, Lamb replied that he had never heard Coleridge do anything else. So might it be said of Mr. Spurgeon that he could not help preaching, and that with a passion that was often irresistible. One can feel him even to this day, in his printed sermons. The pulpit was his throne, and he occupied it like a king. The word ever upon his lips was the word "grace." It is the very essence of Christ's gospel. It is the one adequate hope of a sinning world. It is the sole comfort of mankind as they face eternity. We are saved by grace; we are taught by grace; we are sanctified by grace; we are enabled to grow because of grace; we are given comfort and triumph in all the tribulations of life because of grace. Our salvation, in its totality, from first to last, is because of GRACE. This was Mr. Spurgeon's message, always and everywhere.
Spurgeon Photo

Spurgeon Photo

Description: Mr. Spurgeon's theology all centered in Christ. It was his never-ceasing note about Christ that gave the great preacher's message universal and abiding power. His sermons are remarkably void of anything peculiar to time, place, circumstance, or condition. His preaching, like the preaching of Jesus, was for all ages, times, and conditions. It is this fact which makes his sermons as profitable in America, or in Europe, or in Africa, or in the Orient as in England. Take any one of his thousands of printed sermons, read it carefully, and I dare to affirm that the truth of such sermon, mind you ¬ó the truth of it ¬ó would have been just as pertinent and appropriate 100 years hence, as it is this hour. His preaching is founded on the fundamental facts of man's nature, and it is ever addressed to man's spiritual condition. Just as the whole message of Jesus bears upon the supreme purpose for which he came into the world ¬ó that is, to save his people from their sins ¬ó even so, the never-ceasing spiritual appeal in Mr. Spurgeon's preaching gives it universality of appeal. It is no wonder that a little boy asked his mother why Mr. Spurgeon kept preaching to him. Mr. Spurgeon believed with his whole being in the divine authority, the divine sufficiency, and the divine finality of Christ's gospel.
Spurgeon Signature

Spurgeon Signature

Description: Here is an photo drawing of spurgeon with his authentic signature at the bottom of it. The signature reads: "Yours very truly, C.H. Spurgeon" The going of C. H. Spurgeon made the largest gap in the ranks of Christ's workers that they have known for generations. Wordsworth's sonnet to Milton, in a troubled day of old England, may well be our sonnet today: "Spurgeon! thou shouldest be living at this hour! England hath need of thee! America hath need of thee!" The Spurgeon spirit of faithfulness, of hopefulness, of intensity, or compassionate sympathy for needy humanity is the spirit for today, and for all the days. A mighty heritage comes to us from one of God's mightiest servants. We are faithfully to carry on with such heritage. This is God's way for His people. The generations stand together in an unbroken solidarity. Joshua must carry forward the work begun by Moses ¬ó Solomon must build the Temple for which David, his father, gathered the materials. "One soweth and another reapeth." And if faithful, "Both he that soweth and he that reapeth may rejoice together."
Spurgeon Tract on Salvation and Safety

Spurgeon Tract on Salvation and Safety

Description: Charles Haddon Spurgeon was born in Kelvedon, Essex in 1834. At the age of twenty Spurgeon became a Baptist pastor at the New Park Street Chapel in London. Spurgeon was such an impressive preacher that the chapel was unable to accommodate all those who wanted to hear him. It was therefore decided to build him a much larger chapel and in 1859 work began on the Metropolitan Tabernacle. When it was finished in 1861 it provided seating for 6,000 people. Spurgeon also became known to a wider audience after the publication of his book John Ploughman's Talk in 1869.
The Future

The Future

Description: The future you can safely leave with the Lord, who ever liveth and never changeth. The past is now in your Savior's hand, and you shall never be condemned for it, whatever it may have been, for the Lord has cast your iniquities into the midst of the sea. Believe at this moment in your present privileges. YOU ARE SAVED. If you are a believer in the Lord Jesus, you have passed from death unto life, and YOU ARE SAVED. In the old slave days a lady brought her black servant on board an English ship, and she laughingly said to the Captain, "I suppose if I and Aunt Chloe were to go to England she would be free?" "Madam," said the Captain, "she is now free. The moment she came on board a British vessel she was free." When the negro woman knew this, she did not leave the ship¬ónot she. It was not the hope of liberty that made her bold, but the fact of liberty. So you are not now merely hoping for eternal life, but "He that believeth in him hath everlasting life." Accept this as a fact revealed in the sacred Word, and begin to rejoice accordingly. Do not reason about it, or call it in question; believe it, and leap for joy.


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