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Text Sermons : Hans R. Waldvogel : Faith (Let go and let God)

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Selected Verses:

Genesis 45:20. Also regard not your stuff; for the good of all the land of Egypt is yours.

Matthew 6:24. No man can serve two masters: for either he will hate the one, and love the other; or else he will hold to the one, and despise the other. Ye cannot serve God and mammon.
Opening:

The discovery of atomic power and energy which threatens our civilization on one hand, and on the other hand promises abundance of life for all the people that dwell on the face of the earth—it’s the discovery of the treasury of creation, and it all came about through the discovery of a very, very simple formula: E=mc2. Now, of course, if you weren’t such intelligent people, I wouldn’t tell you this, because I see by your bright eyes that you understand exactly what I’m saying, and that’s good, because I don’t!

But anyway, I’m thinking of another very simple formula—very, very simple—so simple that many people miss it. It’s like this: “let go, let God.” That opens all the treasury of heaven to a poor, lost sinner: the treasury of righteousness, of holiness, of overcoming sin, of healing for the body, of eternal life—just as simple as that. Ah, but you know, once you try to let go…!


Selected Quotes:

And Joseph said, “Don’t regard your stuff. Come on, I’ll take care of you. Come on. I’ve got toasters that are made of platinum and diamond-studded; you don’t need anything. Don’t take anything along. Come on; hurry up!” And God says, “You can’t serve two masters.” Here’s your Master, glory to God! “Don’t call anybody ‘Father’ upon this earth.” They may have been very good, very wonderful to you, but “how much more shall your heavenly Father…O ye of little faith!”

But isn’t that the trouble? We hang onto our own strength and our own righteousness and our own wisdom, and our heart is occupied and is ensnared and is troubled. And as long as our heart is troubled, it means that we are idolaters: we bow to a god that cannot save; we submit to a master that has enslaved us a long time and will not let us enter into the kingdom of God. It isn’t until we really let go. Oh, how simple! That’s “entering into rest.” “We who have believed…” Oh, I need a sight of my Jesus. Great faith produces great abandonment.



You’ll be made “a new creation in Christ Jesus.” He’ll do that. “As many as received Him…” But listen, “You can’t serve two masters.” Lots of people try to do that. They still hang onto things of earth and to their own efforts at righteousness, or their sin. But, oh, to let go! “Forget the things that are behind;” “reckon yourself dead indeed unto sin,” because it’s so: “As Thou hast given Him power over all flesh.”



We don’t let God. Maybe you did “let go,” but you must “let God.” You do that by exercising this union with the Son of God. Jesus, You are in my heart. Maybe you see corruption there; maybe you see bondage there, and as long as you see it, you’ll certainly be enslaved. God says, “They looked unto Him.” Hallelujah! As many as looked, lived.



Stop moping about your helplessness and your hopelessness and your unworthiness. You’ll never be different! You only aggravate the trouble, but let it go!


German at 11:22:

Lass das alte lecke Wrack versinken ins Meer. — Let the old, leaking wreck sink into the sea. Perhaps this is a quote from Reichs-Lieder, no. 152.





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